Kickstart This: Six Lessons Learned

By Kerry Schafer

Recently I ventured into completely uncharted territory for me – a Kickstarter campaign for the purpose of producing a quality Indie book. When I say recently I mean so recently that the sweat from my shaking fingers hasn’t yet dried on the launch button. I can’t set myself up as a success story if we judge success by how well the Kickstarter does in the long run. But I have managed to get as far as Launch, so I thought I’d share some lessons learned from that part of the process.

Whether you’re an Indie writer or a Hybrid writer who might someday want to try a Kickstarter, or just somebody who is interested, here are six things I’ve learned about Kickstarters in the last few weeks.

1) What IS a Kickstarter Anyway? I’ve sort of passively wondered about this for awhile. I knew they existed and involved money and crowd sourcing, but that was the extent of my knowledge. Basically, Kickstarter.com provides a place for creative types to present a business proposal for a creative project. Backers commit to supporting the project at varying financial levels but no money exchanges hands unless and until the project is fully funded. In exchange for their support, backers are rewarded in the form of some item directly connected to the project. For writers these rewards often take the form of books, contact with the writer over Skype or phone or coffee, input into the story, a chance to name a character, and so on.

2) Successful Projects Start with a Video, or at least so says the Kickstarter website. It’s possible they have sadistic people working there and just like to see introverted creative types squirm like a worm on a hook. Or maybe their claim that potential backers want to see and hear from the project creator is valid. Whatever the truth of the matter, if you find yourself in this situation rely on the kindness of friends. You’ll be amazed at what they will do for you in terms of support, editing, advice, and even possibly appearing in your video.

3) You’ll Need to Do Math. You may think I’m kidding, but this is true. People who are considering backing a project want to see a reasonably detailed budget. How much have you allocated for various expenses? Does it all add up to what you’ve set for your goal? Have you considered the costs of the rewards you’ve promised? Oh, and don’t forget the 5% Kickstarter claims if the project funds. Backers want to be sure you’ll be able to deliver on the promised goods.

4) It’s Scary and Exciting. Putting yourself and your beloved project out there – whether it’s a book, or a CD, or something you’re building – pulls out all the emotional stops. There’s the excitement of a whole new adventure, combined with the fear that nobody – not even your best friend and your mother – will back your project. Not funding could be ego crushing, especially when you consider that the Potato Salad Guy made, like, millions. On the other hand, having people back your project is like an unexpected visit from your fairy godmother.

5) It’s Business. At the end of the day, what you’re really doing is asking people, some of them total strangers, to support a business proposition. So it’s not really about you and whether people like you or not. That said, it is important to present as trustworthy and reputable. You don’t want to look so dodgy they think you’re going to take the funds and run off to become the next evil overlord of Gotham. The advice I was given is to be as transparent as possible and present your plan and your goals clearly.

6) You’ll Need Help. This is one of those things you can’t do on your own. You’ll need people to talk you down from the trees and people to give you a motivational kick in the pants. You’ll need eyes on your proposal to see what you’ve missed. You’ll need voices to help get the word out after you hit the launch button. The good news it that writer types are the most generous people on the face of the planet. Ask your people. They will be there for you.

 

Publishing, The Avenue of Broken Dreams: Getting Back to the Basics

By J.A. (Julie) Kazimer

Being an author is awesome.

That being said, it can also be humbling as hell. I learned this very lesson this past week. I was wearing a smile from ear to ear after receiving a royalty check for The Assassin’s Heart. Then WHAM! I taught a class at the Thornton Recreation Center on Saturday, and once again realized the truth.

Being an author is hard. (Yes, please cue the world’s tiniest violin music).

The people in the class were great. Don’t get me wrong. I love writers in all shapes, sizes, ages, genres and point in their journey. Teaching workshops is one of the things I like best other than the actual writing part of being an author (okay, I hate the writing part but I love, love, love the have written part). These students were interested and excited to learn about publishing…

Then I started speaking…

And their excitement started to wane. Their eyes grew watery with unshed dreams of author riches. And I knew I’d just destroy a roomful of peoples’ publishing dreams.

Crap.

Had I been in the business too long to remember what it was like to dream of cross the country (paid for by your publisher) book tours like those Richard Castle has? Had the glow of seeing my first book in a bookstore dimmed? Had I lost my innocent edge (For those of you who know me, no commentary on my innocence or lack thereof)?

I’d broken hearts. And I had no way to mend them.

Because, as anyone reading this blog knows, publishing is hard. Really hard. There is no easy answers. No right way. No magic beans. Hell, writing your first book is the easy part. It’s what happens in the trenches after typing the final word that makes or breaks a writer.

So yes, I crushed many dreams this weekend, and I feel bad for doing so.
I can only offer this to those hearts I’d broken.

Writing is worth it. Telling your unique story is inherently valuable (just maybe not in tons of cash money and world renowned fame or maybe it is? Who am I to say?).

I think everyone should write, whether they should publish is a different question. One you must answer for yourself after you receive your first, tenth, fifth, hundredth, and in my case thousandth rejection.

It’s not about how you start your publishing journey, but in how you live it daily.

And for me, right now, I’m going back to basics. To being excited when I type the end. To feeling the terror of a new release. To sharing with my readers my excitement for storytelling. And seeing the writerly possibilities in each day.

How about you? What does back to basics mean for you as a writer? How’s your publishing view?

www.jakazimer.com
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Guest Post: Daven Anderson “I survived Colorado Gold, and you can, too!”

By Daven Anderson

As we find ourselves enjoying another lovely fall season in colorful Colorado, some of you reading this may be lamenting that the only “Colorado Gold” you won last month were the fallen leaves you raked from your backyard.

You didn’t win. You didn’t final. Agents aren’t camping out in your backyard, contracts in hand.

Fear not, my literary friends, for I am here to tell you that you have not reached the end of your story.

Quite the opposite, in fact. You have reached the beginning.

The true prize from the Colorado Gold is not to win or final, but to learn. To learn to listen objectively, instead of taking constructive criticism personally. To learn that professional writing is a journey of the soul, not just a process. And to learn that the true skill a professional writer must demonstrate, on a daily basis, is perseverance. The best writer in the world is equal to the worst writer in the world, when both are writing nothing.

I still apply the many lessons I learned from my three-year Colorado Gold odyssey. One of which is that the qualities which make your odyssey personal are the oddities no one else can ever gain insight from. The criticisms you received are unique to you, your work, and the judges’ mood the evening they read your entry.

Some of you may choose not to re-enter a particular work in future years if it did not win or final in Colorado Gold. But those who can persevere, and learn from the criticisms, can make their work much stronger than it was before.

I entered the same novel in Colorado Gold three years in a row, 2010, 2011 and 2012. The latter two entries incorporated many hard-won revisions, in line with the insightful criticisms I received for my previous entries.

Re-reading my 2010 entry filled me with the urge to put a bag over my head. I am frankly shocked it scored as well as it did. After the 2010 contest, I was filled with the motivation to hone my skills.

In 2011, I entered Colorado Gold flush with confidence, knowing that my entry’s prose had improved a seeming ten-fold, compared to the foppish tones of its predecessor. The comments were much more positive overall, yet my score was only four points higher than the year before. In gearhead terms, my “new Mustang GT” barely beat my “clapped-out Pinto” when the final scores were tallied.

Ah, what to do for 2012? Maybe the judges were confused about the juxtapostion between my prologue and Chapter One. And I had heard much talk of prologues being anathema to agents and editors. So, for my 2012 Colorado Gold entry, time to broom the prologue and start with Chapter One.

Of course, my hard work in 2012 was rewarded with my lowest score yet. Yes, even my rank amateur 2010 entry outscored its 2012 successor. Yet the comments and critiques I received for the 2012 entry were notably more positive than for either of my previous entries. Even within the small world of Colorado Gold entries, the scores alone don’t tell the whole story. And this was the most important lesson I learned from that year’s contest.

Yes, my novel “Vampire Syndrome” failed to win or even final in Colorado Gold, for three years in a row. The only thing “Vampire Syndrome” had won by the end of 2012 was a publishing contract. I am far from being a unique example here, as a fair number of my fellow RMFW members also have released traditionally-published novels that did not win or final in Colorado Gold.

So, in summation, lament not your “loss” in Colorado Gold. Those who learn and persevere have what it takes to win the writing game. You may lose the “battle” of Colorado Gold, but the lessons you learn can lead you to your true victory. The triumph of prose, and the self.

On a Quest for a Good Book

About a year ago I decided to limit my reading diet to self-published books. Not forever, just until I found some new favorite authors to follow. I really want to support the self-published community as much as possible and figured I’d have a strong list of auto-buys by now. Unfortunately, that hasn’t happened.

I know there are fabulous self-published authors out there because I have found some, and I must say I’ve been doing my picking based solely on blurbs, reviews and sample pages. I figured that would be enough to help me gauge my enjoyment and justify an investment of reading time.

Here’s where I went wrong: I should have asked for recommendations. I have discovered that most reviews are unreliable, both the good ones and the not-so complimentary ones. But I’m stubborn. I wanted to make my choices based on objective sources. Lesson learned.

Why have I had such a difficult time finishing these books? It’s mostly my bad luck, but I did discover structural problems in the majority of the stories I deleted from my Kindle after reading only a few chapters. Of the books I selected, the writing was fine, grammar good, voice passable, but plot and character suffered from a lack of practiced craft and developmental editing. They read like manuscripts that passed muster with a critique group, but not an editor.

They started out great or I never would have bought them. The sample pages caught my interest, the premise captivated me, so the beginnings of these books rocked. But I stopped reading somewhere between 20% and 30% of the way in. Maybe they suffered from contestitis, where the author had made edits and polished the beginning pages based on contest feedback. The rest of the story never received the same attention.

We talk a lot in RMFW about strong beginnings, effective hooks, introducing interesting characters, establishing stakes and obstacles… but it shouldn’t stop there. The strength you start with needs to carry through the rest of the book.

The problems I encountered were:

Bland characters – Characters who start out strong, then lose their purpose, or lack motivation, or just don’t care enough about the goal they had to begin with.

No tension – The story’s tension leaks out like a slowly deflating balloon. Time is spent exploring secondary plotlines instead of the main one, and the problems faced at the beginning are put on hold. Not good. Not good at all.

Disappearing characters or too many characters – It’s hard to focus on a main character when everyone in the story begins to have equal billing. Or when the most interesting person gets killed off or drops out completely, I lose interest in reading any more.

Likable characters become unlikable – It really upset me when a character I cared about seduced her stepfather about a quarter of the way into the book. I’d thought he was a nice guy, too. He’d raised her, for crap sake. They both turned out to be turds. Ugh. Those are hours I’ll never get back. I didn’t start reading another book for a couple of weeks after that.

Confusion – Mysteries I like. No, mysteries I love. But I don’t like it when things stop making sense. Confusion annoys me.

Meandering plot – Starts out heading in one direction then veers off in another for no apparent reason.

Exposition overload – I’m really tolerant of backstory, and probably enjoy reading it more than most people do, but even I have my limits.

Too many pretty sunsets – Or sunrises, or beaches, or gardens, or forests… You get the picture, which is the problem. Too many pictures. I adore good description and even teach a class on it, but too much kills the pace and saps life from your story.

Repetition – Same scene, different setting. Again. And again. It helps to change things up now and then.

Chaotic choreography – Action is a very good thing to have in your story, but it needs to be handled with a practiced hand. Fights, tangled lovers, car chases… When a lot is happening all at once, it should be clear in the reader’s mind what’s going on.

Call me picky—because I am—but I really wanted to love these books. I’m looking for an enjoyable reading experience and my goal is to find some great self-published books to fill that need.

Do you know of any self-published books you think I’d enjoy? If so, please leave the title and name of the author in a comment here. Thank you!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Karen DuvallKaren Duvall is an award-winning author with 4 published novels and 2 novellas. Harlequin Luna published her Knight’s Curse series last year, and her post apocalyptic novella, Sun Storm, was released in Luna’s ‘Til The World Ends anthology in January 2013.

Karen lives in the Pacific Northwest with her husband and four incredibly spoiled pets. She is currently working on a new contemporary fantasy romance series.

 

Adventures in Genre Writing: Lesson Three – Some Rules

By Jeanne C. Stein

I know, I know. I, more than anyone else, hate it when someone says there are “rules” to writing, especially since exceptional writer W. Somerset Maugham warns: There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.

And of course, for every rule we set there will be an exception that works perfectly well. But the rules I’m setting forth here apply to ALL writing. They are basic, maybe too obvious, but worth mentioning. Think of them as a motivational tool!

First, Robert Heinlein’s Five Rules—

Heinlein (1907-1988) was one of the first authors of bestselling, novel-length science fiction. He was also one of the first to break into mainstream markets and is often called the “dean of science fiction writers.” He freely gave away his five rules because he said almost no one would follow them—hence he was not afraid of competition. What are they?

1. You must write.
2. You must finish what you start.
3. Your must refrain from rewriting except to editorial order.
4. You must put your story on the market.
5. You must keep it on the market until it has sold.

Did I mention they were obvious?

Let’s start with rule one. How many people do you know that have either started a novel or said that they plan to write one “someday?” They are not writers. A writer puts his butt in the chair everyday—even if it’s fifteen minutes at lunchtime, during the baby’s nap or an hour before bedtime. If you are serious about writing, you will make time. One of the participants in a past class said she wrote 79,000 words in 28 days writing just two hours a day. Some of you have participated in Write a Novel in a Month challenge held in November of every year. It can be done. It takes desire and discipline.

Rule two—another no-brainer. Yet, there are countless unfinished manuscripts floating around out there waiting for the magic moment when their authors find time to finish them. Refer to Rule one.

Rule three—This does not mean NEVER rewrite. It means don’t keep REwriting Chapter One because you want to make it perfect. If you have a critique group, let them offer suggestions as you go along, but forge ahead. Don’t get hung up on one sentence or page or chapter. When the manuscript is finished and you get an editor or agent, they will tell you what more needs to be done. A note here: I have been told by fans of Heinlein that he really DID NOT ever rewrite! I think that may be a little extreme! One of my favorite authors, though, the late Robert B. Parker also said he never rewrote anything. I wish I could be that confident in my writing!

Rule four—May be the hardest rule of all. It’s scary to launch your baby on the world, but you have to. Research markets, research agents and editors, network at conventions. Get it out there.

Rule five—I take it back. This may be the hardest rule. If you’re lucky, you’ll strike gold right out of the box. If not, take whatever comfort you can from knowing that authors from J. K. Rowling to Stephen King have faced rejection. Many rejections. It’s different when it happens to you. It’s personal and it hurts, especially if it comes in a form letter. On the other hand, sometimes you receive a real letter offering advice and extending an offer to reread the manuscript after you make whatever rewrites are suggested. This is a very GOOD rejection letter. It means you’re on the right track.

Okay—let’s move on to some of my own personal guidelines:

1. You want to write the great genre novel—read that genre. To grab an audience, you need to know what it wants.

2. Now that you are familiar with what that audience wants, write for that audience.

3. Learn about conflict—creating it, resolving it.

4. Structure your story for maximum impact.

5. Beginnings and endings are most important—learn to make them so good, your readers will not be able to put the book down once they start and disappointed when they get to the end because they want more.

Rules three, four and five will be covered in subsequent lessons.

As for rules one and two, I know the popular conception is that since it often takes two years for a book to go from acceptance by a publisher to release, if you write what’s hot in the market NOW, by the time your book is released, the wave has passed. Perhaps. On the other hand, if you write the book you WANT to write, if it’s well written and compelling, it doesn’t matter what’s “hot” in the market. Well-written stories find an audience.

Remember, the best writers are readers. They read everything…fiction and nonfiction, genre and literary works. And they write. Everyday.

One well-known and prolific writer, the late Elmore Leonard, had his own set of rules. But they can be summed up with this: If it sounds like writing, rewrite it.

Amen to that.

Next month we’ll start looking at developing our characters.

The Intangible Benefits of Having a Traditional Publishing Family

Rogue's Paradise
By Jeffe Kennedy

I’ve worked with a number of editors over the years. Many of them were one-night stands – especially back in my younger days, when I wrote mainly essays and played the magazine market. While I mostly enjoyed those passing encounters – though a few were blind dates that I couldn’t wait to put behind me – I’ve discovered the joys of the long-term relationship.

I’m in a monogamous three-way these days. I work with two editors on my novels and I’m faithful to them. At least for the time being. One, Deb Nemeth, my Carina Press editor, I’ve been with since 2011. We just completed the Covenant of Thorns trilogy with Rogue’s Paradise. And we are putting to bed the eighth book we’ve worked on together. I won’t pretend it’s always been hearts and flowers. The beginning wasn’t a honeymoon. She put me through two revise and resubmits, made me work to win her heart. Now we’re committed to each other with legal contracts. We’ve learned to work through the rough times, to remember to add compliments along with criticism, to take some time away before disagreeing.

I admit I felt a little guilty when I started seeing another editor, too. I didn’t want Deb to feel slighted or that she wasn’t enough for me. I needed to branch out, be with other publishers. Fortunately she understood that and now I’ve been with my Kensington editor, Peter Senftleben, for two years now. He’s a different editor than Deb is, which brings stimulating variety to my life. He has his own quirks I’ve learned to accommodate and he mine. We’re working on our fourth book together and each time just gets better.

It’s not always easy, juggling two marriages like this. I sometimes have to ask – with some chagrin – if they’re the one who prefers I just accept line edits in Track Changes or to comment them out. They know about each other and, when I see them respond to the other’s tweets, I often find myself smiling at the warm feeling that inspires. I don’t think they talk about me, but I wouldn’t mind if they did. After all, it’s only fair.

I like having these two people as partners in my publishing life. They shore me up and keep me honest. It feels good to me to be part of a family. And it occurs to me that self-publishing with its wealth of possibilities – which I’ve taken advantage of with some of my back list – is a lot like single parenting. Sure you can hire help, much like a single parent can get day care, and there’s a lot more freedom, but it’s a lot of work, too. I really admire the people who can carry it off, like my best friend and crit partner, for example.

But I do think this is something that writers should factor in when considering whether to go indie. For me, having this publishing family means a great deal. It’s worth it to me to sacrifice some independence and financial gain to have it. I know not everyone needs that. At this time in my live, however, I know I do.

Pen and Paper? Are You Kidding Me????

By Mark Stevens

I recently sparked a flutter on Twitter.

I mentioned that I write by hand.

Yes, full novels—start to finish.

By hand.

I mentioned this on Twitter and I could hear virtual jaws dropping from coast to coast.

Okay, in reality, I had five or six comments along these lines: “Are you KIDDING ME??????”

I also found a few like-minded souls.

Soon, we had a club forming. Men and women of the Pen & Paper Brigade will only listen to vinyl, take pictures with film and write books by hand.

It’s the only way to go.

First, a notebook is so damn portable. No hunts for electrical outlets in the coffee shops. Trains, planes, automobiles, canoes, rocket ships. Doesn’t matter. Got a place to sit down in the woods? In the park? A mountain cabin off the grid? You’re set.

Second, that sound. I’m addicted. That faint, dull scrape of ink going on a page. It’s visceral. It’s real.

Third, less time staring at a computer screen. Don’t we all need less? And no worries about outdoor reflections, moving around so the sun is just right. When you write by hand, it’s a non-issue. Have you ever headed to the computer and waited ten minutes while updates are installed? Non-factor.

Fourth, the process slows me down. My storytelling head is slow. Fresh copy goes on the right side and then the left is open and available for inserts and new ideas.

Fifth? Well, this is kind of a stupid reason but I dig seeing the notebooks stack up. I shoot for 500 words a day. That’s it, that’s all. I try to get in five days a week of writing. It never works out exactly. Some weeks fail, others get in a groove. But I recently finished a novel in about 14 months, including uploading the darn thing to a computer. Yes, at some point there is computer involved but then it’s a solid second draft.

Here are my tools.

  1.  College-ruled, 1-subject notebooks with perforated pages, 11 inch by 8 inch. I like 100 sheets per notebook. I’m not super fussy about my notebooks, but you get the idea.
  2.  A uni ball VISION ELITE. (I think the lower-case uni ball is official and I don’t want to be disrespectful so I’m going with it.) I prefer the “bold” tip. I like blue. Black is okay. I’ve tried many other options. Nothing comes close. (Dear uni ball folks: One case may be shipped to my home address in exchange for this endorsement. Email mstevens@ecentral.com for shipping particulars.)

Any downsides? None that I know of, other than trying to decipher that gnarled-up penmanship. Man, that’s some wild stuff.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Mark Stevens
Mark Stevens is the monthly programs coordinator for Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers and the author of the Western hunting guide Allison Coil mysteries Antler Dust and Buried by the Roan.
Book three in the series, Trapline, will be published by Midnight Ink in November 2014

The RMFW Spotlight is on Christine Jorgensen, RMFW Secretary

The first Monday of the month the RMFW Blog features one of the members of the board of directors or a volunteer. This month Christine Jorgensen has agreed to answer our questions. We hope this helps members and potential members get acquainted with the incredible folks who keep Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers going and growing. And just in case these spotlights inspire other members to step forward and volunteer, feel free to email Judy Matheny, Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@rmfw.org.

????????????1. Christine, tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I am currently Secretary of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. I am neither a glutton for punishment nor an avid note taker, but I do believe that if one gains from an organization and believes in it then one should give back. This is my way of saying thank you for all the support and comraderie I’ve had all the years (and they are many) that I’ve been a member of RMFW.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

My latest novel is Missing, the first Detective Casey Jansen crime novel. The author name is CTJorgensen, to distinguish it from my previous humorous amateur sleuth novels. This one isn’t the least bit humorous. Missing is a finalist in the mystery catagory for Colorado Book Awards, 2014. (MIssing can be found at online booksellers including Amazon and Barnes and Noble in hardcover and ebook.)Jorgensen_Missing

My current work in progress is Disappeared, which is being revised (or will be when I finish this task) in order to be submitted. It will be the second in this series.

3. We’ve all heard of bucket lists — you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish– what’s one of yours?

Hmm, Bucket List. In the most distant and unlikely to achieve category is trekking in Bhutan, achieving national best seller status, getting film options on the books.

In the category of slightly more achievable is seeing my China book in print (in some form), visiting Croatia and the Greek Isles and seeing Disappeared nominated and winning the Colorado Book Award.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what’s yours?

Procrastination wins in this category. Call it Spider Solitaire, playing bridge, playing golf, (actually practice ranging) or snacking, it’s all procrastination. And, I’m a champion.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

I love those moments when I’m totally into writing and occupying a whole other world where time and space are not a factor. I’m sure most writers enjoy this strange place. If it were scary to be there I’d think it really was schizophrenia, but it’s so enjoyable and free that it is all fun and play. Untangling a situation to find the people inhabiting it and tromping around in their motivations is just so interesting.

The other truly satisfying moment is when I’ve written a scene I really like or come upon an idea that works perfectly. Then I have this high. No other way to express it.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Trust yourself, get at it earlier, work harder and produce more.

7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

OMG, no possible way to describe this desk. What I do have that I love is a print by Salvador Dali depicting Don Quixote on his horse looking at a windmill so far away. The picture so summarizes the writing life.

The other item is an artificial palm tree right in from of my desk, just for fun.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I bought Julie Kazimer’s Frog Prince book and totally loved it. I gave it to my friend to read (she’s also enjoying it) so I can’t remember the exact title, but it is such a hoot.

While I’m writing I tend to read more nonfiction than fiction, then once the project is completed I dig into my TBR stack. Tainted Mountain, by Shannon Baker is top of the list.

Other favorite authors are Tana French, Minette Walters and Stephen White.

Thanks a bunch for sharing with us today, Christine.

A Writer’s Destiny

By Mary Gillgannon

When people find out I’m a writer, they often ask, “Where do you get your ideas?” The implication is that it must be a struggle to come up with things to write about. Frankly, that’s never been my problem. My problem is finding the hours and days and weeks and months (and sometimes years) it takes to transform my story ideas into books.

Even without considering my latest project, I have at least ten books waiting for me to finish them. Some are hard copies sitting in a closet in our family room. Others are gathering dust on floppy discs. A few are saved on jump drives. (Technology marches on.) And that still doesn’t count two completed manuscripts that I haven’t figured out what to do with.

Just to finish all of those books would keep me busy for the next ten years. And that’s if I didn’t get any new story ideas, which is unlikely.

My challenge has always been “what to write?” Throughout my career, I’ve vacillated between writing what I thought I should write and the books that really called to me. Right now I’m in a dutiful phase.

Last spring I sold a reincarnation romance. I pitched it as a series, so as soon as I sold it, I felt obligated to drop the story I was working on and write the second book in the series. But it’s gone very slowly. So slowly that recently I began to wonder if maybe this just wasn’t the right time to write this book. Was it really normal to spend so much time staring at the blank computer screen? Was this a sign I should be working on something else?

But then I reminded myself that ideas and the beginnings of books always come easy to me. It’s the middle part that is a challenge. And while this book may take longer than I’d like, in the end, finishing it will mostly be a matter of persistence and hard work.

And patience. I have to accept that I’m notorious for coming up with story ideas that take me into realms I don’t have any experience in. I’ve been known to flounder for years. With the result that the book I’m most proud of took me nearly ten years to finish to my satisfaction. Not to mention I ended up writing about twice as many words as the final manuscript.

I guess this is just the way I have to do things. People talk about “plotters” and “pantzers”. Well, I’m a plodder. Which means that every book takes as long as it takes. It’s a nightmare career-wise. But I doubt there’s anything I can do to change it. I just have to hope that some day I’ll finish a book at the right time and all the stars will line up and I’ll finally find writing success.

And if that doesn’t happen? I’ll just keep plodding along, following my destiny, one book at a time.

TOP TEN LIST: Things Overheard At A Book Release Party

By Kevin Paul Tracy

Caricature of David Letterman

Here is a list of the top ten things overheard at a book release party.

10. “My wife loves your books! Can you sign it to her: Roger Smith?”

9. “Is the author someone famous, or just a writer?”

8. “Yes, the author signed it, we couldn’t stop him. If you can find an unsigned copy, it’s worth an absolute fortune.” (A nod to the movie “Notting Hill”)

7. “I have the best idea for a book…maybe you could write it!”

6. “Wake up, honey, he’s done reading out loud.”

5. “You mean I have to pay for it?”

4. “I’ve written a book, too. It’s a 500 page memoir of my grandfather’s struggles with gout. I happened to bring it with me. Would you mind reading it and telling me what you think of it?”

3. “I always come to these things. You never know what’s going to turn out to be priceless…after the writer is dead.”

2. “I’ve heard of door prizes, but the book’s cover imprinted on a butane lighter? Doesn’t bode well for the book itself.”

And the #1 thing overheard at a book signing party:

1. “Is this the line for the restroom?”


Check out Kevin’s latest releases, the wonderfully entertaining espionage thriller, “Rogue Agenda” and a startling and engrossing gothic thriller “Bloodflow.”

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