Category Archives: RMFW Events

The 2015 Writer of the Year is Susan Spann!

By Wendy Howard

CLICK HERE to view the announcement party photo gallery. The 2015 Writer of the Year finalists were Joan Johnston, Cindi Myers, and Susan Spann.

Susan SpannSusan Spann's mysteries have made a splash, published in hard cover to unfailingly good reviews. Her third Shinobi mystery, Flask of the Drunken Master, was published earlier this month and now Susan has been named 2015 Writer of the Year. Her mysteries are set in sixteenth-century Japan and feature ninja detective Hiro Hattori and his Jesuit Sidekick, Father Mateo. The first book was Claws of the Cat and the second was titled Blade of the Sumarai.

Claws of the Cat was named a Library Journal mystery debut of the month and was a finalist for the Silver Falchion Award for Best First Novel. As a result, Susan was interviewed for an article in Writers Digest by Chuck Sambuchino.

Susan has been a voracious reader since preschool in Santa Monica, California. In high school, she wrote her first complete novel, a fantasy that started as a short story assignment, though she vows that book will never, ever see the light of day!

A yearning to experience different cultures sent Susan to Tufts University in Boston, where she immersed herself in the history and culture of China and Japan and earned an undergraduate degree in Asian Studies—a background she draws upon for her Shinobi mysteries. But before justice-seeking ninjas took over her imagination, Susan went to law school. She practices law in California, where her long-lasting love affair with books led her to specialize in intellectual property, business, and publishing contracts. She has also been a law professor.

Susan is the current president of the Northern California chapter of Mystery Writers of America, and also a member of the MWA National Board. She belongs to Sisters in Crime and the Historical Novel Society.

Susan founded and is curator of the #PubLaw Twitter hashtag, through which she provides pro bono information for writers and answers questions about copyright and publishing issues. When not writing or practicing law, she raises seahorses and rare corals in her marine aquarium.

Susan has been an RMFW member since 2010 and has presented workshops for conference. She lives in California but remains a regular monthly contributor to the RMFW Blog, Writers In the Storm, and Murder Is Everywhere. She met and pitched to her agent, Sandra Bond, at the 2011 Colorado Gold Conference. Please visit Susan’s website to find out more.2015 WOTY finalists

The Free July Program is on the Western Slope

Western Slope Free Program - No RSVP

Two workshops, two presenters, one morning.
Join us!

Saturday, July 11th, 9:15 AM to 12:00 PM
Grand Junction Business Incubator Center
2591 Legacy Way, Grand Junction, CO

BAD MOON RISING: SET THE TONE THROUGH MOOD AND ATMOSPHERE
~with Warren Hammond

Your character needs a voice, and so does your setting. Whether it's dark-and-stormy or bright-and-sunny, it's time to bring your setting to life just like your characters. Learn to take your writing to a new level by infusing your story with mood, tone and atmosphere.

QUERY LETTERS 101
~with Angie Hodapp

A query letter is a one-page pitch letter—an absolute necessity for novelists seeking agents. Writers dread writing them, agencies receive hundreds each week, and most of them elicit no more than a form rejection letter. However, there are many things writers can do to avoid that fate. Angie Hodapp of Nelson Literary Agency will walk you through writing a standout query while avoiding common pitfalls. Learn the anatomy of a query letter, including what it should (and shouldn’t) say about both you and your completed manuscript, and practice writing synopsis paragraphs that are clear, concise, and compelling. Get tons of tips and tools that will maximize your chances of landing a publishing contract.

What’s Going On At Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers?

The Colorado Gold Conference

JefferyDeaver200x230Have you signed up yet? With keynote speakers like Jeffery Deaver and Desiree Holt, how can you go wrong? Add in agents and editors--Danielle Burby, Trish Daly, Denise Dietz, Tiffany Schofield, Chelsey Emmelhainz, Sarah Joy Freese, Erin George, Carrie Howland, Emily S. Keyes, Melissa Jeglinkski, Ben LeRoy, and Latoya C. Smith--and you know Westminster, Colorado is the right place to be September 11-13, 2015.

If you haven't registered yet, you better do it now. Last year the conference registration was filled in record time. You don't want to miss out. For all the information on master classes, conference sessions, meals, hotel, and how to register, click here to go to the website's conference pages.

The Podcasts

Mark Stevens is currently hosting a series of interviews and programs with the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Podcasts. Podcast #5 featured Heather Webb with "Finding Your Voice." #4 -- Holt Finalist Tina Ann Forkner Talks Romance & James Norris Previews RMFW Workshop on Boosting Character Conflict.

The complete list of podcasts and links are available in the website Podcast section right here.

The Blog

Are you following the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers blog Monday through Friday? With a team of regular contributors and several guest bloggers each month, all from the RMFW membership list, the blog is a great way to meet other members and enjoy the information they're willing to share with the tribe and all aspiring writers interested in what we do here at RMFW.

Did you follow Jeanne C. Stein's lessons in genre writing? Get a chuckle (or a groan) from reading the humor of Julie Kazimer or Aaron Ritchey? Explore ways to get reviews with Janet Lane? All these and more are available on the blog pages of the RMFW website.

By the way, you can sign up to receive email notices of each new blog post so you don't miss anything. Just scroll down the blog page until you find the Email Address (in red) box in the right sidebar.

The Social Media Connection

Go to the Home Page or the Blog Page and you'll find the little Social Media icons in the right sidebar with links to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and more.

Are you a member?

If you visit the website, listen to the Podcasts, attend the conference, enjoy our monthly free classes, or read the blog, but haven't become a member of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers yet, why not today?  Here's the link for membership information.

Pearls of Wisdom … by Guest Rhonda Blackhurst

Rhonda_Genrefest 2015Last month I attended Genre Fest 2015, an event organized by the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, Rocky Mountain Chapter of Mystery Writers of America, and The Colorado Authors’ League. The speaker for the morning was David Morrell, creator of Rambo–-as well as numerous novels (both fiction and nonfiction) and short fiction-–and to say I was impressed is a serious understatement. While I expected great pearls of wisdom coming from such a successful author–-and he certainly delivered--what I didn’t expect was his level of humility. What an incredible man. Would I go see him again if he’s in the area? In a heartbeat! I realize I just used the dreaded exclamation point, but that’s how strongly I feel about it. I would recommend anyone who has the opportunity to grab that sucker. You won’t be disappointed.

While I couldn’t possibly mention all of the golden nuggets of advice, some of the ones that I’ll always remember are:

His five rules for writing mystery/thrillers (and could fit with any genre) are:

1.)  Know why you're writing what you are. If you’re writing what you are simply because it’s popular at the moment, you may want to re-evaluate writing that genre. What you’re writing should be personally meaningful; because you can’t imagine not writing it; because it should be worth spending a year (or more) of your time on.

2.)  Know the history of the genre you’re writing. He states, “we can’t recognize when a plot is hackneyed if we don’t educate ourselves about the best that has been done in the genre.” He suggested that if you’re writing a specific genre, you should know enough about the history that you could give a lecture on it.

3.)  Do your research. Your research can come from interviewing experts, reading non-fiction books on the subject, physically visiting the place you’re writing about as well as doing the activities you’re writing about. This last one, in particular, opens all five senses to the experience. The Internet is another deep well to gain knowledge. What not to do is to get your research from TV or movies. The details are not reliable. (Think courtroom and police dramas.) My husband and I both work in the law enforcement arena, and trust me when I say real life is nothing like it shows on Law and Order, CSI, The Good Wife, etc.

4.)  Be yourself. His exact words are worth repeating over and over and over. And over again. “Be a first-rate version of yourself rather than a second-rate version of another author. Innovate rather than imitate.” Wow! (Yup, another exclamation point.)

5.)  Avoid the genre trap. What we write should be the most exciting and moving novel that we can write. Our job is to write a genre novel that doesn’t come off as a genre book.

Other notable mentions:

  •  There are no “odds” on whether you will succeed, get published, etc. What happens to you happens 100%.
  • One thing all of us writers are prone to is daydreaming. In fact we can’t shut it off. Children are often told to “stop wasting your time daydreaming” as if it’s a negative thing. In reality, daydreaming is not a waste of time at all. It’s where ideas come from. The key is to be aware of your daydreams. Too often they’re mini narratives that we dismiss.
  •  Don’t write what you’re supposed to. Write what you’re meant to.
  •  Don’t chase the market because you’ll always be looking at the back side.

I had David Morrell’s writing book, The Successful Novelist: A Lifetime of Lessons about Writing and Publishing, on my bookshelf at home waiting to be read. I bumped it ahead of all the others I want to read and I’m not regretting it.

This post was originally published by Rhonda Blackhurst at her blog, Novel Journey, on April 12, 2015.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Rhonda was born and raised in northern Minnesota and now resides in Colorado. She is a paralegal, restitution advocate for a District Attorney's Office, avid reader, writer, and lover of words. Her greatest joy is her family, which includes her husband, two sons, a stepdaughter, one granddaughter and five step-grandchildren. Her love of writing blossomed at the tender age of four when she began writing with crayons on the knotty pine walls of her family home. Her first published novel, The Inheritance, was born from NaNoWriMo in 2012. She is in the process of writing the first two books in the Melanie Hogan mystery series, Shear Madness and Shear Deception.

Her blog, A Novel Journey, can be found at www.rhondablackhurst.com. She can also be found on twitter at @rjblackhurst and her author Facebook page at www.facebook.com/rjblackhurst.

What’s Going On at Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers?

The Colorado Gold Conference

JefferyDeaver200x2302015 Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
Colorado Gold Conference

September 11-13, 2015
The Westin, Westminster, Colorado

Keynote speakers: Jeffery Deaver and Desiree Holt

Register now at the RMFW website conference page.

 

Colorado Gold Writing Contest for Unpublished Novelists

The deadline for entering is June 1st, 2015

New This Year
Enter the first 4000 words of your manuscript and a 750 word synopsis in one of six categories. Final judges will pick 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners.

The final judges for Colorado Gold 2015 are:

Action/Thriller: Denise Dietz, Senior Editor, Five Star Publishing
Mainstream: Danielle Burby, Agent, Hannigan Salky Getzler Agency
Mystery/Suspense: Trish Daly, Associate Editor, William Morrow/HarperCollins
Romance: Latoya Smith, Executive Editor, Samhain Publishing
Speculative Fiction: Emily S. Keyes, Agent, Fuse Literary
YA/MG: Melissa Jeglinski, Agent, The Knight Agency

You'll find lots more information and submission requirements on the RMFW website contest page.

 

Upcoming Free Programs

Sean-CurleyThe State of Independent Publishing presented by Sean Curley

Saturday, May 9, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Grand Junction Business Incubator Center
2591 Legacy Way
Grand Junction, CO
Western Slope Free Program for members and non-members

Joining the Revolution: Self-Publishing Made Simple presented by Teresa Funke

Saturday, May 16, 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Anythink Wright Farms Library
5877 E. 120th Ave.
Thornton, CO 80602
Denver Free Program for members and non-members

 

The #RMFWBlog

And while you're checking out these great opportunities, please stop by the blog and scroll through the posts -- a team of regular bloggers and lots of visiting writers provide writing advice and encouragement most weekdays.

We use the hashtag #RMFWBlog on Twitter so you can always find information on the most recent posts there. We also post the links on Facebook and Google+. To make sure you don't miss anything, you can sign up for email notifications of new posts.

Getting Critiqued in the Colorado Gold Contest—Winners Weigh In … by Jennifer Kincheloe

The RMFW Colorado Gold contest is a competition for unpublished writers of genre and mainstream commercial fiction. It is a rare chance to get your work in front of industry professionals, such as literary agents and editors, who judge the contest and also provide feedback.

This blog is the second of a three-part series where previous winners share their experiences with the Colorado Gold contest. Part One, "How the Colorado Gold Contest Changed How I Feel About My Writing," published on Monday the 27th. For today's blog, I asked them whether the judge's feedback was helpful to them in their writing. Here is what they said.

"As with all critiques, the comments are always helpful. They just need to be taken with a grain of salt. What someone else may think sounds better may not work for your story. Only you can be the true judge."

          Jessica Naab, author of the 2013 Romance Winner, Between Skin and Soul

"Matt Martz, an editor with Crooked Lane Books, was the final round judge. At the conference after the program on Friday night, he was kind enough to give me about a half hour of his time to discuss the story. He wanted to know where it was going. He’d only seen the first twenty pages. He made some suggestions and asked me to send the completed manuscript when I thought it was ready."

          Kevin Wolf, author of the 2014 Action/Thriller Winner, The Homeplace

"Yes, although at the time I didn't agree with it. They questioned my choice of POV character, and whose story it really was as I have a main character die. At the time I was adamant I wasn't changing the POV character, and yet, twelve months after winning the competition, based on additional feedback, I had made changes close to their recommendations."

          Kristin Meachem, author of the 2013 Mainstream Winner, Ten Seconds

"The judges’ feedback was fantastically helpful. The year I won the mystery category was the first year the finalists got the chance to revise their entries using the first round of judges’ feedback before the entry went to the final judge. The comments were insightful, encouraging, and constructive. My entry was greatly improved using the suggestions of the judges."

          Mary Birk, author of the 2014 Mystery Winner, The First Cut

"Extremely! The feedback helped me to recognize where my strengths are and where I could improve. I found the judge’s comments to be honest and for the most part spot on."

          Kara Seal, author of the 2014 Young Adult/Middle Grade Winner, The Shuvani's Spell

"Their feedback was extremely helpful. Fresh eyes provide fresh suggestions. There were several feedback comments that I’d never thought of before, and the edits resulting from those comments strengthened the beginning of my book. Sometimes all it takes is a single sentence added or deleted to enhance your story’s momentum. The judges offered areas I could trim, places I could expand, but they also marked what they liked. The best feedback is a balance of enjoyment and improvement."

          Michael Carson, author of 2104 Speculative Fiction Winner, Beauty is for Suckers

"Definitely. Getting that kind of critique is always great. In high school and college when I was writing creatively, receiving a teacher’s critique was always terrific. In my twenties and thirties, as a journalist, getting feedback from my editor was always helpful. And now, as I return to writing fiction, the feedback I’ve gotten from workshops, my critique partner and beta readers helps show what is working, and what, quite frankly, is absolute 100% rubbish. So to enter a contest and get feedback from it? That’s tremendous. Not only is it one more opinion to consider, but it’s one from an industry source—and those aren’t easy to come by."

          Monica Comas 2014 Mainstream Winner, The Cookbook

"Exceedingly so! My protagonist is an Iraq veteran, and by pure chance – or perhaps by providence – so was the judge who read my work. His comments, and the extra tidbits of information he provided about military life and the Iraq war, were invaluable for a cake-eating civilian like me."

          Charles Kowalski, author of the 2013 Action/Thriller Winner, Unbelievers

In part three of this blog series, winners will share where their winning novels are today. To hear about rewrites, agents, Hollywood, and publishing deals, visit my website.

For more about these winning writers and the status of their books, visit Jennifer Kincheloe's blog post "Colorado Gold."

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The Colorado Gold Contest for unpublished fiction closes June 1, 2015. For more information on how to enter, go to http://rmfw.org/contest/rules-and-entry-instructions/

Jennifer Kincheloe is a research scientist turned writer of historical mysteries. Her first novel, The Secret Life of Anna Blanc, will be out November 3rd from Seventh Street Books.

You can learn more about Jennifer and her novel at her website. She can also be found on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

How the Colorado Gold Contest Changed How I Feel About My Writing … by Jennifer Kincheloe

As an aspiring author, it was hard to know where I truly stood. Was my book good? Excellent? Abysmal? People seemed to like it, but honestly, I had no idea.

The RMFW Colorado Gold Contest for unpublished writers changed how I felt about my writing. The contest put twenty pages of my novel in front of industry professionals, such as literary agents and editors, who gave me frank, expert feedback.

In 2013, I won the mystery category for The Secret Life of Anna Blanc, a slightly humorous, somewhat romantic, mystery novel set among the LAPD police matrons in 1900's Los Angeles.
Winning validated me in a way that polite critique groups and loving relatives could not.

For the first time I felt like maybe I could do this. I could be a novelist.

I asked other Colorado Gold recipients whether winning the contest changed how they felt about their writing. This is what they said.

"All writers have moments when they feel, 'All my work has been for nothing; this book will never be published and doesn’t deserve to be.' Whenever a thought like that crossed my mind, I’ve looked up to my wall where the award certificate hangs in its frame. It’s as if a guardian angel were standing by my side saying, “I beg to differ."

          Charles Kowalski, author of the 2013 Action/Thriller Winner, Unbelievers

"It definitely gave me a motivation and self-esteem boost. I didn't have much confidence in my writing before, but I thought that if I could win the contest then there may be hope for me after all!"

          Jessica Naab, author of the 2013 Romance Winner, Between Skin and Soul

"Winning the Gold was huge for me. It helped validate the years of hard work I put into the book. In order to win, a novel needs to earn high praise from two amateur judges as well as one professional serving as the final judge; so winning the contest means there are at least three strangers who think your idea, your writing, and your storytelling is pretty amazing. For an aspiring writer, that's an amazing moment. I'll never forget it."

          M.H. Boroson, author of the 2012 Speculative Fiction Winner, City of Strangers, which  will be published as The Girl with the Ghost Eyes

"It’s special to have one’s work recognized by peers and friends. The recognition gave me confidence that my efforts on the right track."

          Kevin Wolf, author of the 2014 Action/Thriller Winner, The Homeplace

"It gave me the belief that maybe I was okay at this writing stuff. To not give up. It also gave me the confidence to let people know I was actually writing a novel. Up to that point, it was my secret."

           Kristin Meachem, author of the 2013 Mainstream Winner, Ten Seconds

"Winning the contest gave me some much needed validation. Writing is a solitary occupation in many ways, and it’s nice to hear someone else appreciates your work."

          Mary Birk, author of the 2014 Mystery Winner, The First Cut

"As a result of winning the contest I feel more confident in my writing. While writing still takes a lot of work, a lot of the nagging doubts about my ability to do this have subsided."

          Kara Seal, author of the 2014 Young Adult/Middle Grade Winner, The Shuvani's Spell

"Since humor is a key element in every project I pursue, if it’s not working and readers aren’t laughing, then I’m in serious trouble. There’s nothing worse than an unfunny comedy, and this concern is always on my mind when I start a new project; it’s the little voice of self-doubt whispering in your ear. The contest has helped counter that voice, and it showed me that my writing is reading the way I intended. "

          Michael Carson, author of 2104 Speculative Fiction Winner, Beauty is for Suckers

"The short answer is no... I still think on some days that I was born to string sentences together…just as I’m still certain on other days that I’m a complete failure who can’t write at all. Winning the contest didn’t change any of that. I guess I just feel lucky that I was picked, that’s all. Sometimes you get lucky, and that contest was my lucky time."

          Monica Comas 2014 Mainstream Winner, The Cookbook

Would you like frank, expert feedback on your unpublished novel? The Colorado Gold Contest closes June 1, 2015. For more information on how to enter, go to http://rmfw.org/contest/rules-and-entry-instructions/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Jennifer KincheloeThis blog is the first of a three-part series in which previous winners share their experiences with the Colorado Gold contest.

Jennifer Kincheloe is a research scientist turned writer of historical mysteries. Her first novel, The Secret Life of Anna Blanc, will be out November 3rd from Seventh Street Books. You can learn more about Jennifer and her novel at her website. She can also be found on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest.

Guest Post: Samantha Ross – Recap of Carol Berg’s Western Slope Workshop

Are they real?

Are your characters real people? According to Carol Berg at the RMFW writers meeting on the Western Slope the answer has to be yes. Readers know it is a story, but the characters need to be alive. The goal should be that they are not characters, but people.

How do we do that?

Through Introduction:

Sum up the person through another’s POV. Start with the general overall such as gender, race, age and so on. Now move onto appearance. Keep in mind that you show rather than tell. What is the voice like, how do they carry themselves? Then attitude. Are they gruff, shy? Don’t forget to start showing gestures, patterns, and habits.

Maybe it’s a gradual introduction from the protagonist or antagonist. Or a few paragraphs. Create layers, and interactions with the setting and also with other characters.

Our people need to be complex. That means they have strengths, weaknesses, hopes, fears, dreams, and goals. Successes and failures both during the story, and before it started. Like everyone, they are going to travel through a range of emotions, thoughts, wants, actions, and reactions.

That character needs to want something here and now. They are also going to have a plan for the future. It may be a glass of water right now, and to win the big race next month. Remember it is colored by the emotional “why” they want it. Those whys are going to include things from the past, present, and future.

As we write this story, we need to create challenges/conflicts that showcases all the above. This person needs to be able to problem solve, take action, have the ability to grow and change as the story progresses.

Through Narrative POV:

 Whoever is telling the story at the moment has the narrative POV. Usually this is the protagonist, the antagonist, sometimes a secondary character. It is limited by the character; meaning every thing is filtered through this character at this moment.

A child at a funeral has a very different POV, vocabulary, actions and reactions than an elderly man. Even between two elderly men there will be things to contrast and compare. They each had a life before walking into the funeral that shaped them.

We learn who he is layer by layer. As he interacts with the other characters and setting, we start to understand him. We see what type of background he comes from, what he thinks of this moment he is in. There is action and reaction. There are choices, and responses. And more choices. And more responses. Dialogue both internal and external all reveals who he is, and what he is going to do. We see the contrast and compare in the narrative POV as he shows, or does not show his opinions, thoughts, and prejudices. How he acts upon these, or does not act reveals much about him. All of this shows us who he is.

We know that we have succeeded in making our characters into people when the reader says, “I knew he would do that!” When our readers thinks about this person outside of the book eagerly awaiting the next story to come out, or to simply open the book and keep on reading. Sometimes over and over.

Samantha Ross pictureSamantha Ross is a ghostwriter, freelance writer and editor. She lives on the Western Slope in Montrose, Colorado. For years she taught adults, organized lesson plans, developed curriculum, and encouraged everyone to be a success. One day she stumbled into her high school librarian who pointed her toward the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. Now Samantha’s days are spent writing fiction and non fiction that covers a wide range of topics. If she’s not standing in front of her desk working, she’s spending time with her family and friends.

 

Why You Should Vote for the WOTY   

By Liesa Malik

writeroftheyearOkay, friends, here’s the low down, the scoop, the real deal – the WOTY is fixed! That’s right. Fixed! And you know why? Because each year three distinguished authors willing to represent our organization with their work end up on a ballot that is under-supported.

It’s rather like local elections. According to Governing Magazine,  during a study by the University of Wisconsin, researchers found a steady decline in voter turn out. Not great at 26.6% in 2001, by 2011, that turnout declined to 20.9%. That’s roughly one in five people who took advantage of the American electoral process. These minorities of voters influence how we’re being governed today.

What has this to do with the Writer of the Year? Plenty. I don’t have any exact figures, but in checking with people involved in the voting process last year, most of our group did not vote for the WOTY. Shame on us all!

WHY THE WOTY MATTERS

The Writer of the Year is someone who represents the highest standards of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers organization and represents our organization throughout the publishing industry. I spoke with Shannon Baker, the 2014 Writer of the year and she said that winning this distinction was life changing.

“Right before the nominations last year, I was ready to quit writing,” said Shannon. “I felt defeated. But the nominating process boosted my confidence, and the vote validated that newfound interest in continuing to write. Not only that, but being able to put the Writer of the Year title behind my name has opened a lot of doors for me.”

She mentioned that she was recently requested to speak at the CU Friends of the Library annual district event. It was a dream come true, yet Shannon said she didn’t approach this group, they contacted her.

Also, at every event, speaking engagement, and book sale (and more of these opportunities come up for the WOTY), Shannon says she does her best to put in a promotion of RMFW.

“I think it’s very important for the Writer of the Year to speak well and knowledgeably about this great organization we’re all a part of. If the Writer of the Year cannot or will not do this, why should they be voted to that honor?”

We hope that at some point, winning the WOTY would be similar to winning a Pulitzer Prize, but until that happens, everyone who is part of RMFW still has a certain celebrity, albeit a tad smaller, for people who love to read.

WHO IS THIS WRITER OF THE YEAR CANDIDATE?

To make finalist, a person must fulfill these hefty qualifications:

  • Be a traditionally published author with a book released in the previous year (in this case, the 2015 WOTY has had a book release in 2014)
  • The WOTY winner is a member in good standing with Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers—while the WOTY is NOT an award recognizing volunteerism (that’s what the Jasmine is for), being active in our community is important too. After all, the Writer of the Year is representing us all in the larger publishing industry.
  • Have a high quality of writing. This may seem like a duh point, but the vetting committee read samplings of each author and had to distinguish candidates based on critical reviews of their work. Talk about hard work! So many great pieces of commercial fiction writing, so few slots we could fill. Whew!
  • Offer proof of significant achievements with their writing work—regional or national reviews or, awards, guest blogs and more.

Every time someone meets the WOTY, they’re being introduced to Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers as a whole. This makes your writing platform even stronger when you mention that you’re part of our organization. Free publicity. How cool is that?

OLD WRITERS’ TALES

In years past, I felt much like you might be feeling today. That is, I didn’t know the writers personally, hadn’t read their works for the most part, and felt that some secret inner circle of friends put together the nomination list in a smoke-filled back room of political dealings.

Sorry to burst your literary dreaming, but this isn’t how things work. The same people are not nominated year after year. In fact, we haven’t had a WOTY become part of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writer’s Hall of Fame. The one qualification for that distinction is to win the WOTY three times. While there have been a number of two-time winners, no one has made the top selection three times.

How things really work is that an author can either be nominated or apply to the WOTY committee for consideration. After all nominations are closed, the WOTY committee of at least five members spends approximately two hours per candidate, reading the application form, checking out websites, and most importantly, reading and evaluating a piece of the writer’s work. This year, with as many candidates as we had, this means that about 135 volunteer hours went into narrowing the distinguished field to just three names.

WHO ARE THE 2015 NOMINEES?

Please watch for the April newsletter when the finalists will be announced. Then, beginning April 20th be sure to vote.

HOW TO VOTE

This year we’re going to try something new. Although you will still have two months to make your decision, we’re hoping to implement voting online via the RMFW website. Please keep an eye on your emails for more information.

And what if you haven’t read the nominees’ work? Try visiting your local library, or you could go onto the major bookseller sites to at least read a sampling of the work. I think you’ll be pleased if you do.

Be sure to read the author profiles that will be a part of the newsletter announcement. I think you’ll agree that we’re lucky to have such high quality writers in our community.

Still think the WOTY is a sham or a fix? The only way you’ll know for sure is to sign in and vote. Personally, I’m excited for all of the nominees and only wish we could select from everyone who sent author information.

Think I’ll go try to up my own level of writing. Someday I'd like to qualify . . . for a WOTY .

Our New Year’s Resolution – Improve RMFW Membership

By Saytchyn Maddux-Creech, Wendy Howard & Corinne O'Flynn

Happy New Year! Did you make any New Year’s resolutions? Have you started achieving your writing goals? Or are you still recuperating from the holidays?

This year the RMFW Board made a New Year’s resolution to improve membership. Last month, in between eggnog, opening presents, and toasting in the new year, we all pitched in to move members into Cvent for membership management, event registration and email communications.

As you’ve probably read in recent emails, and seen on rmfw.org, you can access the new website at http://www.cvent.com/d/7rqn24/3W. We’ve also sent you instructions to log in and renew your membership when your renew date comes around. Are you still wondering how Cvent improves your online membership experience?

Upcoming events and event history are in one location: After logging in to the Cvent site you’ll land on the My Events page. Go to this page at any time and see upcoming events, events you’ve registered to attend, and a history of events you’ve attended.

Event pages provide more information: Check out the 2015 RMFW Writers Retreat on Cvent. Click on the tabs and find everything you need to know about an event: event summary, session agendas, speaker bios, maps to locations, forms to contact event leader, social links, all a click away.

Membership management is in one location: Your membership information and preferences are now in one place on the My Profile tab. Update your personal information there as well as identify your membership expiration date, renew your membership, manage your email preference, and add/remove your entry in the new members directory.

Similar home page to rmfw.org: The home page at the Cvent site is similar to the home page at rmfw.org. Go to either site for up-to-date highlights about RMFW happenings and links to additional information. Note that we are still moving into Cvent and apologize if some information is not yet available there.

NEED MORE HELP MOVING IN?

We are here to support you through the transition. Written instructions are available on the rmfw.org website and volunteers are available to help you manage your membership account:

Need log in help? Click on the Login link on rmfw.org for instructions to log in to your new account. The information on this page will also help you create your password if logging in for the first time.

Need to renew your membership? Go to the RMFW FAQs page for instructions to find your membership expiration date and pay to renew your membership.

Need membership related support? Contact Saytchyn Maddux-Creech, RMFW Membership Chair at membership@rmfw.org.

Have questions about a particular event? Go to the Contact Us tab on any event page and fill out the form to contact the event leader.

Need email support because you’re not receiving emails or need to update your subscription lists? Contact Corinne O’Flynn at communications@rmfw.org.

Need other website support? Contact Wendy Howard at website_liaison@rmfw.org.

Have a general question about the changes? Add a comment below and we'll answer it here.