Tag Archives: Cindi Myers

Look What You Missed….and What You Can Still Sign Up For!

If you thought you could wait until the last minute and then sign up for Trai Cartwright’s screenwriting class, too bad. That class filled up in a hurry.

There’s lots more going on with Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, so peruse this list, follow the link if something looks interesting, and join others looking to learn and make contact (eye or virtual) with their fellow writers.

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First, there’s the online class that starts tomorrow. “Writing Meaningful and Memorable Sex Scenes” is presented by Katriena Knights. The two-week course starts Monday, March 3rd, and ends on Sunday, March 16th. Cost is $25 for members and $30 for non-members.

“There’s no question about it: sex sells, and the current romance market is thriving on more explicit content than ever before in the history of the genre. However, readers are discerning, and even the most daring content will fall flat if it isn’t integrated into the story on an emotional level and on a story level.”

Katriena’s class is not focused on romantic novel sex or erotica. It’s all about the right use of sex scenes in all genres. Don’t be shy. You know you want to put a sex scene in your next book. Learn how and when it’s appropriate and not gratuitous. For more information about the class, visit the RMFW website. And if you want to pass information and go straight to registration, you can do that too.

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2014 Conference Proposals Reminder: RMFW’s conference chair is accepting workshop proposals for the 2014 Colorado Gold Conference through March 31, 2014.

Go to the Conference page on the RMFW website for suggestions to help you make your workshop stand out and the link to the proposal form. If you have any questions, email Susan Brooks at conference@rmfw.org

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March Program free for members and non-members: “Think You’re Ready for the Colorado Gold [Writer’s Contest]”?

Presented by Chris Devlin on Saturday, March 15, 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm at the Belmar Public Library, 555 S. Allison Parkway, Lakewood, CO 80226.

“Making the finals in RMFW’s annual Colorado Gold Writing Contest is a great way to get your work in front of agents and editors. Many past winners and finalists have gone on to have their books published. Finaling in the well-respected Colorado Gold is also a clear badge of honor to help market and promote your work. Don’t miss this opportunity to spend an afternoon with contest chair Chris Devlin. Come learn what makes a good entry great, what catches a judge’s eye, and how to avoid common mistakes.”

For more information, head on back to the RMFW website and check out this program page.

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If you live within snowshoeing distance of the Western Slope, RMFW has a program for you as well. Presented by Cindi Myers, this workshop is called “Agents: Myths vs. Reality.

This event is free for members and non-members on Saturday, March 15, 8:30 A.M. – 1:00 P.M. at the Grand Junction Business Incubator, 2591 Legacy Way, Grand Junction, Colorado. Please RSVP to Vicki Law at vruchhoeft@bresnan.net.

Expanded continental breakfast will be served at 8:30 A.M. and the workshop will begin at 9:00 A.M. and end approximately noon. From noon to 1:00 P.M. is networking, socializing and clean-up.

“Do you need an agent in order to get published? What will an agent do for you? What can’t an agent do? How do you find a good agent? Do you really need an agent in today’s publishing world? Award-winning author Cindi Myers discusses the myths and realities of dealing with agents, how to find the best agent, and how you can get published without an agent. In this frank discussion, Cindi will share her experience and that of other multi-published authors, and answer your questions about working with agents.”

For more information and directions to the event location, hop back on over to the RMFW website to that program page.

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becomeamember01If you aren’t convinced by now that you need to become a member of this fast-growing and extremely prestigious writers’ organization, which you can do by going here, then take a look at the upcoming retreat in Golden, Colorado March 16-21 (flexible day registration open until March 15th) and some of honored guests for the September 5-7 Colorado Gold Conference in Westminster, Colorado.

Members get a fantastic newsletter, opportunities to guest star on the RMFW blog, and more.

Awesome Events Ahead from Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers

Attend a Class

Online Class
Editing and Revision
for Fiction Writers
Presented by Cindi Myers
3 Week Course

Start Date: Monday, February 3
End Date: Sunday, February 23

$35 Members – $40 Non-Member

Register

E.B. White said “The best writing is rewriting.” No matter how much care you put into your first draft, only when you’re done and you’re able to see the book as a whole will you be able to give the work the polish it needs. If you’re a rough draft writer like Cindi Myers, the editing and revision process is where the real magic of creating a book happens. Cindi will share her process and techniques for taking a story from a messy rough draft to a polished gem ready for submission. Exercises and class interaction will help you address your particular editing and revision problems and learn techniques for making the daunting task of editing a complete manuscript more manageable.

In Person Class
RMFW Screenwriting 101 with Trai Cartwright
Tuesdays, 6:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M.
Start Date: March 4
End Date: April 22
2369 Trenton Way, Suite M
Denver, CO 80231

$225 Members – $250 Non-Member

Register
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Submissions for 2014 Conference Workshop
Submit Workshop Proposal
RMFW is now accepting workshop proposals for Colorado Gold through March 31, 2014.

If you have any questions, email Susan Brooks at conference@rmfw.org.

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RMFW Anthology 2014 Submission Guidelines
Download PDF of Theme and Guidelines
Anthology Theme: Crossing Colfax
Submissions are due by March 14, 2014.

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Attend the 2nd Annual RMFW Writers Retreat

With Special Guest, Agent Kate Schafer Testerman
Organized by Angie Hodapp
March 16-21, 2014
Table Mountain Inn,
Golden, CO
REGISTRATION CLOSES FEBRUARY 15TH

The 2013 writers retreat was a smashing success! It’s back in March of 2014 and will become an annual spring event. How much does it cost to attend the retreat? We are pleased to introduce flexible registration options. Attend for two days (minimum), three days, or all four days, and pay only for the days you attend. How do I register? Go to the RETREAT EVENT PAGE for more information and the link to register.

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New events and other announcements are available on the Home Page of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers website.

Exciting Events Ahead from Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers

Attend the 2nd Annual RMFW Writers Retreat

With Special Guest, Agent Kate Schafer Testerman
Organized by Angie Hodapp
March 16-21, 2014
Table Mountain Inn,
Golden, CO
REGISTRATION CLOSES FEBRUARY 15TH

The 2013 writers retreat was a smashing success! It’s back in March of 2014 and will become an annual spring event. How much does it cost to attend the retreat? We are pleased to introduce flexible registration options. Attend for two days (minimum), three days, or all four days, and pay only for the days you attend. How do I register? Go to the RETREAT EVENT PAGE for more information and the link to register.

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Attend an Online Class

Heroes, Henchmen, and Sidekicks:
The Characters-First Approach to Plot
Presented by Angie Hodapp
2 Week Course
Start Date: Monday January 6
End Date: Sunday, January 19
$25 Members – $30 Non-Members
MORE INFO

Editing and Revision
for Fiction Writers
Presented by Cindi Myers
3 Week Course
Start Date: Monday February 3
End Date: Sunday, February 23
$35 Members – $40 Non-Members
MORE INFO

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Attend a Free Program in January

Denver
Short Story Breakdown:
Prepping for Anthology 2014 Crossing Colfax
Presented by Nikki Baird
Saturday, January 25
1:00 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.
Bel Mar Public Library
555 S. Allison Parkway
Lakewood, CO 80226
MEMBERS ONLY
MORE INFO

Western Slope
Writing the First Pages of Your Novel
Presented by Shannon Baker
Saturday, January 11
8:45 A.M. – 1:00 P.M.
Grand Junction Business Incubator
2591 Legacy Way
Grand Junction, CO
Please RSVP to Vicki Law at vruchhoeft@gmail.com
MORE INFO

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New events and other announcements are available on the Home Page of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers website.

Writing About Real Places in Fiction

By Cindi Myers

Cindy Myers_MountainbetweenReal people, places and events often spark story ideas. If you’re going to “write what you know,” setting seems a good place to start. Writing a book set in a real town makes research easy, and it gives you an interesting marketing hook. People like to read about places they know. A real-life setting for your story anchors your fiction in reality, and adds another dimension to your story. Stephen White’s suspense novels would be different books if they were set in Los Angeles instead of Denver and Boulder, and Anne Rice’s vampire tales would have a different flavor if they took place in Washington, D.C. instead of New Orleans.

Basing your story in a real town also has drawbacks. People in the town may think your characters are based on them or their friends. If you say anything negative about a business, or some other aspect of the town, you risk offending people. The smaller the town, the greater the problem may be.

I once wrote a series of five romances set in Crested Butte, Colorado. One of them, The Right Mr. Wrong, was nominated for a Rita award. I did a signing in Crested Butte and got some good coverage in the local paper. If anyone disliked my take on the town, I never heard about it, and overall, it was a good experience. I hope I made some people want to visit this fun, beautiful place.

If you decide to use a real place in your fiction, make sure you know it well. Double-check street and place names. I keep a map near my desk and refer to it often. I also take lots of photographs and refer to these to help me describe places accurately. If you’re going to have something awful happen in the book, such as a murder, or even a disastrous dinner, make up a business name instead of risking raising the ire of a real place.

But maybe you want to sidestep the whole problem of a real person being offended (maybe even enough to file a lawsuit). So you decide to make up a town. Even if you do this, basing your fictional setting on a real place can help you create a stronger sense of reality. You can describe actual places, but give them new names. Shift things around to better suit your plot. Keep the flavor, but spice it up a little.

I’m currently writing a women’s fiction series set in the fictional Colorado mountain town of Eureka. Eureka is based on a trio of real towns: Ridgway, Ouray, and Silverton. I use local traditions, highways and some place names. I’ve changed the names of local businesses and features. For instance, in my books, Red Mountain Pass is Black Mountain Pass. I’ve provided enough clues in the books that people who are familiar with that part of Colorado recognize the area, and they’ve had fun trying to pick out the real places in the book from ones I’ve made up.

I could have set my books in one of the real towns, but I chose not to for a few reasons. First, we have a house in Ridgway and hope to live there full-time when my husband retires. Not every character in this series is nice. The librarian, Cassie Wynock, is pretty unpleasant at times. The book is sort of like the old television series “Northern Exposure” and the quirky, not always pleasant characters might offend overly-touchy folks. Instead of risking that, I made up a town. The name Eureka, comes from a ghost town in the area.

I also wanted to use the geographic features of several towns. The second book in the series, The Mountain Between Us, which was just released, has the town snowed in, the passes on either side of the town blocked by a blizzard – as happens in Silverton from time to time. But the street layout is more similar to Ridgway.

By basing my fictional town on a real place, I ground the story in reality, but have the freedom to make up things as needed.

Whether you choose to write about a real place or a fictional one, drawing inspiration from real settings can help you create a vivid world your readers will want to visit again and again.

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Cindi Myers
Cindi Myers is the author of the Eureka series, including The View From Here, which won the 2013 Colorado Book Award for genre fiction, and The Mountain Between Us, just released. Find out more about her and her books at her websites Cindi Myers and Cindy Myers Books.