Tag Archives: Crossing Colfax Anthology

Short Story Anthologies with Class (for my homework)

By Patricia Stoltey

crossingcolfax150I just finished reading the complete Crossing Colfax anthology from Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers, then headed off to Goodreads and Amazon to post my comments and rate the book a big beautiful five stars.

Writers who can produce quality stories with unique ideas, imaginative twists, and great characters, and fit all of that into 500 to 10,000 words, deserve our applause. It's hard! The story ideas that appear in Crossing Colfax are very clever. I think I've learned a few things from the fifteen authors whose works are published here. I look forward to many more anthologies from RMFW. To learn more about the individual stories, read Mark Stevens' story-by-story review from January 6th.

Tales of Firelight and Shadow coverReading in the same genre we write is part of our education process. The more we read, the more we learn about what hooks the reader and what fails. We marvel at the creativity of those who find new ways to tell an old story. That works for short story writing as well. I recently had my first traditionally published short story, "Three sisters of Ring Island" (a retold folk tale) accepted and included in Double Dragon's Tales in Firelight and Shadow. The editor of that anthology is Alexis Brooks de Vita.

The taste of publication was sweet. I want more. Reading a variety of anthologies in a variety of genres is how I'm going to study.

Dessert Sleuths Anthology-Cover-HR-200x300As I looked for the best of the best, I discovered a whole big world of writers and publications. For crime lovers, local chapters of Sisters in Crime offer collections like SoWest: Crime Time from SinC Desert Sleuths. RMFW member Shannon Baker is one of the authors you'll find in that group. You'll find many more if you search on "Sisters in Crime" at your favorite online bookseller.

Mystery Writers of America produces quality crime anthologies on a bigger scale. Manhattan Mayhem is coming in 2015. The 2014 publication was called Ice Cold: Tales of Intrigue from the Cold War.

There's a group of authors in Minnesota called the Minnesota Crime Wave that published an anthology called Fifteen Tales of Murder, Mayhem, and Malice. Colorado Gold favorite William Kent Krueger is one of the crime writers in that collection.

I have a copy of Open Doors: Fractured Fairy Tales on my coffee table as well. Katherine Valdez, a member of my critique group, wrote Little Red Riding Hood Seeks Vengeance for this book.

Pooled Ink 2014Winners and finalists for the Northern Colorado Writers fiction and non-fiction contests earn publication in the annual Pooled Ink anthology. The 2014 edition released in November. Reading Pooled Ink should help a writer learn what it takes to final in or win top prize in the NCW contests, so I plan to add the 2014 collection to my stack of homework.

If you have been published in such an anthology in any genre, please leave the anthology name and a buy link below in the comments. I need to round out the genres with a bit of romance, a little sci fi, and some great YA tales.

RMFW Spotlight on Nikki Baird, Anthology Chair

Our second spotlight of the month features Nikki Baird who is serving as anthology chair. Nikki was happy to join in the fun because she wants to see a large number of RMFW members at her workshop tomorrow and is hoping for lots of great member story submissions for Crossing Colfax, the first RMFW anthology since 2009.

The workshop is called Short Story Breakdown: Prepping for Anthology 2014
Saturday, January 25
1:00 P.M. to 3:00 P.M.
Bel Mar Public Library
555 S. Allison Parkway
Lakewood, CO 80226
Members Only

The deadline for submitting to the anthology is March 14th. For more information and the submission form, go to the anthology page on the RMFW website.

nikkibaird1. Nikki, tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I am the anthology chair, which means that I shepherd the production of RMFW's short story anthology. The organization has produced 3 collections so far, and this will be our fourth - and my first in this role. But it will also be the first anthology produced in this wild west of self-publishing, which is very exciting.

It's been awhile since RMFW has produced an anthology, and I've increasingly realized the importance of short stories both in advancing a writing career as well as advancing craft. So I became passionate enough (or just plain crazy enough) to decide that a) this is something that RMFW should do again and b) I will volunteer to lead it. So here I am!

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

I'm actually in the process of putting out my own short story collection, as a way to dip my toes in the water of self-publishing. The collection is called Uncanny, and I hesitate to give a publication date because every time I do that, life gets in the way big time. But I'm in the process of designing covers right now, so it should be available "very soon."

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

To go to St. Petersburg, Russia and experience a white Russian night. I was a dual-major in college, and Russian was the second major (which is a really long story all on its own), but I never got to spend a semester there because that happened to be right as the Soviet Union fell apart and it became very inadvisable to travel there. Would've definitely helped my language skills. But St. Petersburg is a city with a fascinating history, built by one of the most enigmatic leaders of Russia, and it is absolutely on my list of things to see in my lifetime.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

Saying the same thing twice. Granted, I say it differently each time, and I usually like both ways - which is why I end up leaving it in on the first pass. I've had to learn to give myself some time to let the love fade, and then I can go back and ruthlessly delete all my over-writing. Either that, or my wonderful critique partners will not hesitate to point out the repeats.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

When my story surprises me. I think I will never know if the connections that suddenly emerge out of nowhere were actually planned long ago deep in my sub-conscious, or if I really did only just see the opportunity, but I love that little jolt of "Of course that's what should happen next! How did I not see that before?"

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Get over the whole grammar over-reaction (you know, the mind-numbing high school lectures on sentence structure followed by the verbal beatings and grades when it was clear I absorbed nothing). The vocabulary of grammar can be confusing and challenging, but every craftsperson should know the tools of their trade, and grammar is the tool of the writing trade. I resisting learning the language of my chosen profession for too long, and I would say it prevented me from quickly learning the "why" behind a lot of the rules out there. It, to be repetitive, slowed me down.

7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

You really want to see this? Just remember, you asked!

The first thing you should know is that, yes, I have a treadmill desk. I just found out that I walked 1,722 miles in 2013, which also wasn't a full year of walking because I didn't set it up until February. I will confess that most of my heavy writing is not done on the treadmill - it's hard to walk, think, and type all at once and I'm always worried I'll mess at least one of them up if I try all three. So the treadmill is only running a couple hours a day, not all day, and usually when I'm thinking or checking email, not when I'm writing.

Baird Desk1.jpgThe very colorful picture leaning against the wall is a wax art piece created by my son, and the larger black & white drawing is one my husband made in high school.

Baird_Desk 2A.jpgThe second thing to know is that the image above is missing its usual occupant, which is the family cat, Katara (named after the Water Tribe girl from the Avatar cartoon series). Next to her is the one thing I always have on my desk, which is a picture of my husband sticking his tongue out at the camera (in the heart frame). It is a reminder not to take myself too seriously.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I am reading The Atlantis Gene, by A.G. Riddle. I've recently bought or downloaded a bunch of different fantasy/scifi/horror e-books on Amazon at different price points to see what the quality of each price point is. This one is pretty good - I will definitely finish it.