Tag Archives: Marsal Lyon Literary Agency

An Interview with Shannon Hassan, Literary Agent with Marsal Lyon Literary Agency

shannonhassan“Shannon Hassan, an agent at the Marsal Lyon Literary Agency, brings a depth of business and editorial experience to her role, having worked in publishing and law for more than a decade. She represents authors of upmarket and literary fiction, young adult and middle grade fiction, and select nonfiction. She is drawn to fresh voices, compelling characters, and crisp prose, and she enjoys both contemporary and historical settings. Based in Boulder, Colorado, she is also eager to hear from authors with a unique perspective on the New West. She does not generally represent genre fiction in the areas of horror, sci fi, or epic fantasy for adults. Before becoming an agent, Shannon was the Acquisitions Editor at Fulcrum Publishing, and prior to that a corporate attorney at Arnold and Porter in New York. She received her JD from Harvard and her BA from George Washington University.”

Pat: Shannon, thank you so much for allowing us to ask you a few questions. We’re hoping conference attendees will benefit from these interviews and that potential attendees will click that “Register here” button.

You’ve had a varied career, not only in publishing but also in corporate law. What lured you away from the legal field and led you to becoming a literary agent?

Shannon: I followed my passion into publishing, and couldn’t be happier working with authors and helping them achieve their publishing goals. Becoming an agent was good a fit for me because it combines the editorial skills and business experience I’ve gained over the years.

Pat: You joined the Marsal Lyon Agency in late 2013, but it looks as though you’ve jumped into your new position with great energy and enthusiasm. You have at least five conferences or major book events scheduled this year. What do you like most about attending conferences?

Shannon: The best part about conferences is the chance to get to know so many great people who share a love for books and publishing– authors, editors, and other agents alike. Not only have I found terrific new authors, I have also made new (or deeper) connections with others in the industry. I also love the relaxed environment that conferences offer. I just went hiking with an editor at my last conference—what a fun way to get to know someone!

Pat: Writers get a lot of advice about how to deliver elevator pitches, but I’m not sure agents enjoy that process very much. When a writer meets you on the elevator (and gets past the initial shock of suddenly being face-to-face with the very agent she wants to meet), should she avoid mentioning her novel and offer to buy you a drink instead? Could you talk a bit about those accidental meetings and how a writer can be professional but still get your attention?

Shannon: I don’t mind accidental/unscheduled meetings at all, as I enjoy getting to know new writers. I would just recommend that a writer try to read the situation before diving in. In other words, does the agent seem open to chatting? Maybe introduce yourself and start a conversation. Or is the agent rushing to an event, or on the way to the bathroom? Maybe not the best time!

Pat: When you participate in those 8 to 12 minute pitch sessions at conferences, what do you consider a great—and hopefully for the author, successful—session? What makes you uncomfortable? Do you have a “worst pitch appointment ever” anecdote for us?

Shannon: Be able to describe your book succinctly. Know your genre and target audience and have some similar “comp” titles in mind. Also, have a few general questions about your work and/or the publishing process prepared in advance. That way, in case your project isn’t sounding like a fit for the agent for whatever reason, at least you are making good use of your time together.

In terms of what NOT to do—well, don’t start off by comparing yourself to Shakespeare or other luminaries (This has actually happened to me). And I personally don’t like to receive pitches for multiple projects—choose your strongest idea.

Overall I’d say just try to relax and make it a conversation– it’s about trying to connect with the agent, not about delivering the most perfect pitch since the dawn of time.

Pat: If an author has successfully pitched his project to you at Colorado Gold, and you’ve requested at least a synopsis and three chapters, how soon would you expect to receive the submission? Can you pin down the top three qualities in that submission that would prompt you to ask for the full manuscript?

Shannon: I don’t have an expected timeline and would hate to see someone rush to send me a submission that is not ready. It is an opportunity—take your time, and do it right. And then when you do send it, make sure to remind me in the subject line that we met at Colorado Gold and I requested these pages.

As to the top three qualities that I look for: (1) exceptional writing, (2) compelling characters, (3) a strong hook.

Pat: Would you tell us about a few of the authors’ books you represent and those you expect to see released in the next few months? We’d love to hear about the projects that get you most excited.

Shannon: I’m excited about a lot of things! I just saw the cover mock-up (always fun!) of THE AFTERLIFE ACADEMY, a funny, imaginative middle grade novel by Frank Cole, coming out by Penguin Random House next year. I’m also looking forward to the September launch of VISION, a gripping YA suspense by critically acclaimed YA author Lisa Amowitz. On the adult side, I am excited about the recent sales of MOON IN THE PALACE, a page-turning historical series by debut author Weina Randel, and ALMOST ANYWHERE, an exquisite memoir by award-winning conservationist and photographer Krista Schlyer.

Pat: What genres do you represent? What genres do you read for fun (assuming you do occasionally have time to read for fun)?

Shannon: I am looking for upmarket and literary fiction, and fresh-voiced YA and MG fiction. I am most interested in smart, character-driven stories that straddle the line between literary and commercial, and enjoy both contemporary and historical settings. You can read more about my background and interests at the agency website.

Pat: You are based in Boulder, Colorado. That seems very logical to me because we have an amazing number of outstanding writers in this state. Others wonder if that puts you at a disadvantage when trying to place your authors’ books with New York Publishers. How do you deal with that distance issue? Do you miss living in the big city?

Shannon: No, I don’t find the distance to be an issue. I used to live in NYC and I go there quite often (I went twice last month!) and stay in good touch with editors there. Not to mention that there are also terrific publishers that aren’t based in New York. I do occasionally miss the energy of living in a big city and my friends there, but after a few days of getting my “city fix,” I am ready for a long bike ride or hike in the foothills.

Pat: Finally, and way off the subject of writing and getting published, would you tell us something fun about yourself that most people don’t know?

Shannon: I love to travel. My family (husband and ten-year-old twins) have been all over South America, including Patagonia and Easter Island, and to parts of Asia. More on the horizon I hope!

Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to our questions, Shannon. We’ll be looking forward to meeting you at Colorado Gold.

Thanks for the interview Pat. I have heard such great things about Colorado Gold and I am really looking forward to it!