It’s All About the Blog, ’bout the Blog…

The Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Blog is a labor of love for those volunteers who spend a year or two here as regular monthly contributors and those who write guestposts  from time to time. The goal is to provide an extra source of information about programs; to educate, motivate, and inspire; and to offer opportunities for RMFW members to share their specialized knowledge.

The blog would also be a good way to introduce more of our members to each other. The organization is growing every year, and there are way too many new members we don't get a chance to meet unless we run into them at a workshop or at Colorado Gold.

Co-editor Julie Kazimer and I have discussed doing a monthly (or twice monthly when we have enough open spots) RMFW member Q&A series, similar to what we do now with our Spotlight series on board members. At the most, however, we would only introduce 24 members in a year. That's not a huge percentage of our membership. Still, there are ways to increase member participation. Perhaps a "Three Members, Three Questions" series? Other ideas are welcome.

I'm going to get things rolling with a simpler series inviting members to share the link to one of their social media sites.

Today it's all about the blog.

Your blog, that is. Do you have one?

If yes, please leave your name and/or pseudonym and your blog's url in the comments below. Also tell us what you write about on your blog (your writing life, writing tips, writing instruction, book reviews, guest authors, etc.).

And then I encourage all readers to drop by and visit your fellow members' blogs. Read a post (or two, if you have time). If possible, leave a comment. Comments make a blogger's day so much better.


Be a good critique partner – Part 1 of 2

I credit the marvelous process of critique with helping me get published, and continue to be published. And just as my fabulous CPs help me, I help them. There’s a compelling reason to give our best efforts with every critique: the better critiquers we are, the better writers we become.

Book Too WonderfulToBeTrue Jan 2016
Photo courtesy of

Many of us have suffered from or heard about nightmare critiques with back-handed comments and thinly veiled insults, and we want to make sure our critiques are both encouraging and helpful. One way to ensure this is to avoid excessive compliments and vague comments.

Here are some critique comments I’ve read over the years in critique groups, along with comments about how to make them more useful to your CPs.

Loved it!!  This will trigger a sense of relief from the submitting writer, but not much more.  Was it the opening that was strong, or the dialogue?  Or just the hunky hero? Include detail so the writer knows what, specifically, worked.

Couldn’t stop turning the pages!  One hopes that means the tension remained high throughout, with enough drama that the reader was anxious to know what happened next – instead of the possibility that you were just in a hurry to finish the critique and get on with your own writing.

This is perfect as is. I wouldn’t change a thing.  We all want to receive a critique like this! When backed up by specifics, this is a gem of a critique I’d copy, put in 60 point Times Roman, bold, and print out for the front of my computer.  Without accompanying comments, though, I’d still wonder if some parts might need work and the critiquer was just being generous.  But then, we writers have been known to be neurotic.

I don’t like your protagonist. This is crushing for a writer to receive. Though it may be true, it’s brutal.  Being writers, we can find gentler ways to say this.  One bit of wisdom I’ve learned over years of critique is: “Don’t send a critique if you’re short for time.”  Whenever I have, I realize I’m more likely to be abrupt, and when abrupt, a sense of uncaring and overly critical-sounding comments erupt that I later regret when I re-read it at a time I’m *not* so rushed.  As a critiquer, you’re walking in a field of priceless human emotions.  Even multi-published authors hardened by years of rejections and reviews can be hurt by abrupt comments.  Always take your time.  Better to be a little late with the critique than to cause unintended harm.

Characters aren’t convincing. Don’t shirk from giving or receiving this comment. This is a gem of an observation, so useful -- if accompanied by specifics. Is the character the ruthless head of an international corporation yet continually shown in scenes as indecisive or unaware of his industry’s jargon?  Or perhaps the character is a prostitute but acts naive in this particular excerpt.

I hope you love your critique partners as much as I love mine, and I wish you many positive comments in your future critiques. My next blog will offer more insights on your CPs’ comments.

Anthology, Workshops, the Blog

Don't Forget the RMFW Anthology

Theme: FOUND. Sometimes things are better off lost. And sometimes they were never meant to disappear. Either way, when they're found, everything changes.

Submissions opened January 1st at midnight and close February 29th at 11:59 PM. Contact Mario Acevedo, Anthology Editor at with questions. Or go directly to the RMFW website Anthology page for more information.

January Denver Workshop

Exploring YA: Trends, High Concept and You

ColleenOakesPresented by Colleen Oakes
Saturday, January 9, 1:00 P.M. to 3:00 P.M.
Anythink Wright Farms Library
5877 E. 120th Ave., Thornton, CO 80602
No RSVP Required

January Western Slope Program

Published Author Panel (Self/Indie/Traditional/Hybrid):
Saturday, January 16, 2016
More information at the RMFW website Western Slope program page.

In this interactive panel of published authors from all types of publishing (James VanPelt, Jan Weeks and Cindy Myers), the panelist will answer a set of specific questions that will provide information on how each type of publishing works. The audience will also have the opportunity to ask questions of their own about the types of publishing and based on their particular situation.

And Don't Forget About Those Conference Proposals.

You'll read more about that on Monday here at the RMFW blog. In the meantime, visit the member section of the website for the proposal submission form.

The Blog

Are you visiting the RMFW blog on a regular basis? Our team of contributors and guest authors work hard to produce educational and humorous posts about writing and the writing life to add to the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers member experience. We feature spotlight interviews with board members so you know who's who. The two most recent past presidents, Mark Stevens and Pam Nowak, are regular contributors along with Mary Gillgannon, Kevin Tracy, Julie Kazimer, Jeffe Kennedy, Jeanne Stein, Robin Owens, Kerry Schafer, Susan Spann, Liesa Malik, Janet Lane, Terri Benson, and Aaron Ritchey.

And we have openings for guest posts from members, published and unpublished. You can contact co-editors Pat Stoltey and Julie Kazimer using the email address if you're interested.

What’s Going On at Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers?

The Colorado Gold Conference

JefferyDeaver200x2302015 Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
Colorado Gold Conference

September 11-13, 2015
The Westin, Westminster, Colorado

Keynote speakers: Jeffery Deaver and Desiree Holt

Register now at the RMFW website conference page.


Colorado Gold Writing Contest for Unpublished Novelists

The deadline for entering is June 1st, 2015

New This Year
Enter the first 4000 words of your manuscript and a 750 word synopsis in one of six categories. Final judges will pick 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners.

The final judges for Colorado Gold 2015 are:

Action/Thriller: Denise Dietz, Senior Editor, Five Star Publishing
Mainstream: Danielle Burby, Agent, Hannigan Salky Getzler Agency
Mystery/Suspense: Trish Daly, Associate Editor, William Morrow/HarperCollins
Romance: Latoya Smith, Executive Editor, Samhain Publishing
Speculative Fiction: Emily S. Keyes, Agent, Fuse Literary
YA/MG: Melissa Jeglinski, Agent, The Knight Agency

You'll find lots more information and submission requirements on the RMFW website contest page.


Upcoming Free Programs

Sean-CurleyThe State of Independent Publishing presented by Sean Curley

Saturday, May 9, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Grand Junction Business Incubator Center
2591 Legacy Way
Grand Junction, CO
Western Slope Free Program for members and non-members

Joining the Revolution: Self-Publishing Made Simple presented by Teresa Funke

Saturday, May 16, 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Anythink Wright Farms Library
5877 E. 120th Ave.
Thornton, CO 80602
Denver Free Program for members and non-members


The #RMFWBlog

And while you're checking out these great opportunities, please stop by the blog and scroll through the posts -- a team of regular bloggers and lots of visiting writers provide writing advice and encouragement most weekdays.

We use the hashtag #RMFWBlog on Twitter so you can always find information on the most recent posts there. We also post the links on Facebook and Google+. To make sure you don't miss anything, you can sign up for email notifications of new posts.

Let’s Change It Up, Baby!

By Patricia Stoltey

Our RMFW Spotlight post for board members and volunteers is going on vacation in 2015. We have a neverending supply of incredible members who have served RMFW well over the years and continue to volunteer,  but when I see that enormous pool of potential interviewees, I realize there's no fair way to pick and choose who deserves recognition now and who can be deferred until later.

Some of our members have been with the organization for dozens of years and helped build the RMFW we see today. They've passed on the volunteer work to newer members, and those newer folks are the ones who are visible, they're the names we recognize.  In a future post, I hope to talk more about our pioneers and why we owe them a very special thank you.

Meanwhile, I'm going to steal this first Monday spot to write about other things, probably not cabbages and kings, but perhaps some observations about writing and the writing life, book promotion (or the lack thereof), new books on these topics, or just about anything else that might pop into my head.

We're happy to take questions and blog topic suggestions, which you can ask through the Ask the Author link on the blog page. The link is in the right sidebar and it looks like this:

askanauthorTo begin, I have a little quiz for you. Did you know.....

1.  There's a new release feature on the front page of the website that shows RMFW member books' cover art and tiny synopsis? Yep, down there in the right sidebar.

2.  You can sign up to receive the blog posts by email? Check out the right sidebar on the blog page, not too far under the Ask an Author badge. Just fill in your email address and click subscribe so you never miss a post.

3.  Registration for the 2015 RMFW Retreat opened yesterday, November 30th? This year the retreat is scheduled for March 11-15 at the YMCA of the Rockies in Estes Park. There's so much to know about this incredible writing opportunity, I'll merely direct you to the retreat page on the website to learn more. I can tell you, however, that I recently attended a writers' retreat with Northern Colorado Writers at the same location, and from Thursday afternoon to Sunday mid-morning, I churned out over 18,000 words, and I still had time for good meals, wildlife watching (like the mule deer wandering outside my window, the wild turkeys, and the elk), and a bit of fun.

And now I invite you to help us all out with our holiday shopping by leaving your book information in a comment below. Please include a buy link to your favorite bookseller and let us know if the book is available in print or ebook. Don't forget to add the Crossing Colfax Anthology to your list for a lucky reader. If you're up in the Fort Collins area, some of the authors will be at the Barnes & Noble on Sunday December 7th from 1-3.


Different Voices Create a Beautiful Blog

By Patricia Stoltey

I feel like someone pulled me through a knothole backwards.

I took a little time off last week and went to visit family in Illinois. And I went unplugged for five days. The five days was great. Now I’m suffering the consequences.

My To Do list is so long I’m as jumpy as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs. I wake up in the middle of the night, thinking of something I forgot to add to the list.

Because I was out of town, the young lady who helps me keep the house from looking like a total disaster couldn’t come, so when my critique group met at my house last night, they had to wade through the clutter and pretend not to notice the dust.

Thank goodness they had no reason to look in my refrigerator or freezer. The ice cream has whiskers and there are unidentified things in containers and plastic bags that might have developed teeth and claws.

I’ve already read all that stuff from the time management gurus. They might as well try to teach me how to milk ducks.

Okay, so those colorful little phrases about knotholes, cats, whiskers, and ducks are not mine. They were swiped from my paternal grandmother who had a fun way of describing her world. That’s her voice, not mine.

That’s where I’m at today. Stealing words from my grandmother because we should have had a guest blogger in this slot.

Instead, you have me.

And that leads me to the point of this whole post.

The Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers blog has a team of regular contributors, each with his or her own point of view and unique voice. We also leave dates open each month so we can host RMFW members who want to make a guest appearance to talk about a pet topic, promote a new book, or share writing life experiences. It’s another way we can introduce members to each other (and to the world) between conferences and workshops. That variety of voices blends in a beautiful chorus that describes our organization and our writing lives better than any one writer could.

Starting in January 2015, we’ll have quite a few of those guest spots to fill (two in January and more in February and beyond). If you’d like to be a guest, contact me at patriciastoltey (at) or Julie Kazimer at jkazimer (at)

Plan ahead, because we try to fill the calendar a month or two in advance.

You don’t want us feeling like that long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs, do you?

RMFW on Social Media

By Patricia Stoltey

If you haven't been out and about lately, you may not know that you can find Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers on:

Facebook  This site reaches 4,153 Facebook readers and writers as of 8/11/14

Twitter  This site has 3,408 followers as of 8/11/14. When there are new posts to the blog, I use #RMFWBlog on my promo so those RMFW members on Twitter can easily find the list of past blog posts with links.

Google+  RMFW is relatively new to Google+ and is a private group. There are 57 members so far.

Yahoo! Group  This site is one of the best ways to stay in touch with the organization and receive special announcements regarding conference, retreat, contest, etc. 257 members are signed up so far.

Anyone know of a social media site I've missed? If yes, please give us the link in the comments.

Well, doggone — no RMFW post today?

By Patricia Stoltey

I have an explanation.

See, I was going to do the Coming Events post today, but then I realized one of the classes I wanted to promote started last Monday. I moved the Events post back to Sunday, and that worked fine.

Except, of course, now there was nothing scheduled for today.

So I thought about it, did some other stuff, procrastinated, went for coffee with a friend, did a batch of critiques and attended my critique group's meeting, enjoyed a massage appointment, and finally ended back up at my computer wondering if anyone would notice if we just skipped a day.

I couldn't do it.

Here's what you'll find on the RMFW Blog:

Posts from regular contributors Mark Stevens, Mary Gillgannon, Julie Kazimer, Jeffe Kennedy, Lori DeBoer, Karen Duvall, Pam Nowak, Kerry Schafer, Susan Spann, Sean Curley, Katriena Knights, Liesa Malik (and starting in April, Tiffany Lawson Inman).

In March and April, we have scheduled guest authors Jan Weeks, Lucinda Stein, Ann Gordon, Julie Luek, Mario Acevedo, Mark and Kym Todd, and Aaron Michael Ritchey.

We'll continue with a monthly RMFW Spotlight on board members and volunteers. Chris Devlin is our victim for April.

And from April through mid-August, we'll be interviewing as many of the Colorado Gold agents, editors, and guest speakers as we can.

You can sign up to receive notice of our posts via email, or watch for the links on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAPatricia Stoltey is the author of two amateur sleuth mysteries published by Five Star/Cengage in hardcover and Harlequin Worldwide mass market paperbacks. The Prairie Grass Murders and The Desert Hedge Murders are now available for Kindle and Nook. Five Star will also release her new standalone suspense novel Dead Wrong in November 2014. You can find Patricia hanging out at her own blog, on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.

RMFW Spotlight – Wendy Howard, Website Liaison

Introducing the wonderful board members and volunteers who do so much for Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers is one of the missions of this blog. This month we shine the Spotlight on Wendy Howard who works behind the scenes to inform and educate writers at all levels, whether they belong to RMFW or not. Her job is neverending. Thanks, Wendy. We couldn't have brought this blog online without you.


wendy12131. Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I do a number of things for RMFW, my main job being Website Liaison. I’m a long-time computer geek, and serving as Website Liaison gives me something fun to do when I need a break from writing and editing. If you have any questions or suggestions for the website, contact me at

I’m also a member of the Publicity team. I prepare and distribute email communications twice a week to remind everyone about events, classes and such. If you have a new release or event to promote, email the details to Time permitting, I’ll include your announcement in an email.

And I recently set up our new RMFW Google+ community. I help run the page with other members of the Publicity team. Be sure to join us at

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available? (Feel free to attach photos of book covers—platform opportunity time!)

My current work in progress is a re-work in progress. Heavy sigh! The first in The Courier series, Call for Obstruction won an award in 2009 and was published by a small press late 2011. Unfortunately, the publisher went out of business and returned my book shortly after it was published. Instead of being upset about losing a publishing contract, I decided to take advantage of the situation and restore the book to the short length I originally intended it to be. That meant cutting out 150 pages, one of the hardest editing task I’ve ever tackled. It’s almost done, and I’m hoping to self-publish it in April. My long-term goal is to find another agent and editor and do the traditional publishing thing with it again.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists-- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

Go on an archeological dig anywhere in South America, but if I do it, I'll probably never come back to the U.S.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

I’ve been a professional writer for over 25 years and I still struggle to call a work complete. I want to edit to perfection and there really is no such thing.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

Developing a new story from an idea, especially inventing the characters and creating new worlds or planets. I also enjoy research and writing the first draft.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Don’t be in a hurry to publish. Learn the craft and be cautious with editors, publishers, and other writers. Over the last five years, I’ve worked with and managed small presses, and have moderated online networking communities for writers and filmmakers. While I've met some of the most amazing people, I can also tell you quite a few horror stories. Join a writer’s organization like RMFW. Being a part of a community is an important step to becoming a better writer and protecting yourself against predators in the publishing industry.

wendydesk7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it? (Include a picture of your work area, if possible)

I move around a lot while writing and editing, and work outside as much as I can during warm months. There’s just something about a change of scenery that stimulates my imagination. I do have an office and on my desk are my idols: Jesus and Abraham Lincoln. Whenever the going gets tough, I sit back and look to them for inspiration. And every now and then I rub the Laughing Buddha’s belly for a little luck.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I just finished Faith on the Rocks by fellow RMFW member Liesa Malik. I attend the Southwest Critique Group with Liesa when I can and sat in on a few critique sessions for Faith on the Rocks. I bought her book at conference last year and had her sign it. I really enjoyed the read, probably more so for knowing a little about the blood sweat and tears Liesa put into her baby.

I’m also reading Extreme Fear: The Science of Your Mind in Danger by Jeff Wise. A very interesting read, and one I’d suggest any writer read. Halfway through the book I’ve learned better ways to torture characters and describe their panicked reactions.

You can also find me on my website, @by_wjhoward, Google+, and sometimes on Facebook.

Introducing the Only-Slightly-Frazzled Blog Editors, Julie and Pat

Pat: Well, Julie, here we are wrapping up two full months of the new Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Blog. Thanks to our techno-goddess Wendy Howard, Mark Stevens and the RMFW Board of Directors, and a great team of regular and guest bloggers, I think it went pretty well.

Julie: I’m loving the blog but really broke a sweat pulling it all together. Oh wait, you already revealed the true worker bees and brain children behind the blog’s success. Yes, they were and are amazing, as were you and your step-by-step directions on how to edit posts (The “first, turn on computer” step was so helpful!)

Stoltey_webPat: I believe in starting with the basics, but maybe that was going a little too far. Anyway, now that we have a few minutes (seconds?) to chat, I think it would be fun to kick back and get to know each other better. Full disclosure: I’ve been going to Weight Watchers since September 2010, and I’ve almost lost 30 pounds. This photo I’ve been using lately was taken at the Northern Colorado Writers Conference in 2011 when I hadn’t made much progress yet. Check out these chubby cheeks. And stay tuned for an updated photo in ten more pounds.

Julie: Wow, that’s fantastic, Pat. Well, we do have a lot in common. I signed on to SparkPeople about 6 weeks ago, and have been working on shedding some weight myself. My cheeks are still a little chubby though. I call my extra face padding my natural Botox-- puffs the wrinkles right out!

Pat high school0001Pat: Okay, I just grabbed a piece of chocolate from my secret stash, so I guess it’s time to change the subject. Not too long ago on my blog, I told my readers three things I didn’t like when I was a kid and invited them to share their own dislikes. After that post, I thought of many more…I guess I wasn’t very easy to please. My hair, for instance. I hated my hair when I was a kid because I wanted to wear it long and straight and silky--like yours in your author photo…but my hair was thick and wavy and preferred to do its own thing. As a result, some of my grade school photos look as though I’d combed my hair with an egg beater (something one of my uncles often told me). By high school, I'd figured out how to set my hair on big bristled rollers to get something remotely resembling a page boy.

Julie Lueck_high schoolJulie: Isn’t it funny how we always long for what we don’t have? I had long, straight hair and always wanted full, fluffy hair with lots of body. I could never make it do the Farrah feathers in the front without cans and cans of VO5 (that was before we knew about the whole ozone depletion thing, of course). Thank goodness the blue eyeshadow and LaDisco jeans with colored stitching help deflect some of the attention away from my flat hair. But enough about hair; surely there was more to dislike in life than that...

Pat: Oh, you want something else? No problem. I was a farm kid with lots of chores to do, and one I really disliked was gathering eggs. The hen house was inhabited by a gang of nasty-tempered hens who persisted in sitting on those eggs and pecking the backs of my hands black and blue when I reached inside the nest. What I hated even more? The huge, vicious white rooster that stood guard. Yes, he would attack. I approached that task armed with a baseball bat…or a pitchfork. I was so traumatized by that damned bird that he was still in my mind and got a whole sentence to himself when I wrote The Prairie Grass Murders.

Julie LueckJulie: Writing therapy--very effective against latent rooster resentment. My mother-in-law tells me her brothers used to chase her with the chickens after they cut off the heads. Her phobia ran so deep, to this day she won’t eat chicken.

I grew up in the suburbs; I don’t remember any animal fears (unless you count rogue squirrels). My dislikes ran more to things like gym class in school. I still shudder to think of the little one piece shorts outfits they made us all wear and the Presidential Fitness tests I could never complete. It was scarring.

Pat: Was your one-piece gym uniform a magenta color? I had to wear one of those back in my day too. For me the worst thing about gym was that test where I was supposed to shinny up a rope. Shinny was not in my vocabulary. Can’t shimmy either...but maybe we shouldn’t go there.

Instead, let’s turn this question over to our readers and the members of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. Come on, tell us. What did you dislike most when you were a kid? You can comment here, or find us on Facebook and tell your story there. Julie on Facebook is here, and I'm on Facebook here.