Tag Archives: Rogue’s Paradise

The Intangible Benefits of Having a Traditional Publishing Family

Rogue's Paradise
By Jeffe Kennedy

I’ve worked with a number of editors over the years. Many of them were one-night stands – especially back in my younger days, when I wrote mainly essays and played the magazine market. While I mostly enjoyed those passing encounters – though a few were blind dates that I couldn’t wait to put behind me – I’ve discovered the joys of the long-term relationship.

I’m in a monogamous three-way these days. I work with two editors on my novels and I’m faithful to them. At least for the time being. One, Deb Nemeth, my Carina Press editor, I’ve been with since 2011. We just completed the Covenant of Thorns trilogy with Rogue’s Paradise. And we are putting to bed the eighth book we’ve worked on together. I won’t pretend it’s always been hearts and flowers. The beginning wasn’t a honeymoon. She put me through two revise and resubmits, made me work to win her heart. Now we’re committed to each other with legal contracts. We’ve learned to work through the rough times, to remember to add compliments along with criticism, to take some time away before disagreeing.

I admit I felt a little guilty when I started seeing another editor, too. I didn’t want Deb to feel slighted or that she wasn’t enough for me. I needed to branch out, be with other publishers. Fortunately she understood that and now I’ve been with my Kensington editor, Peter Senftleben, for two years now. He’s a different editor than Deb is, which brings stimulating variety to my life. He has his own quirks I’ve learned to accommodate and he mine. We’re working on our fourth book together and each time just gets better.

It’s not always easy, juggling two marriages like this. I sometimes have to ask – with some chagrin – if they’re the one who prefers I just accept line edits in Track Changes or to comment them out. They know about each other and, when I see them respond to the other’s tweets, I often find myself smiling at the warm feeling that inspires. I don’t think they talk about me, but I wouldn’t mind if they did. After all, it’s only fair.

I like having these two people as partners in my publishing life. They shore me up and keep me honest. It feels good to me to be part of a family. And it occurs to me that self-publishing with its wealth of possibilities – which I’ve taken advantage of with some of my back list – is a lot like single parenting. Sure you can hire help, much like a single parent can get day care, and there’s a lot more freedom, but it’s a lot of work, too. I really admire the people who can carry it off, like my best friend and crit partner, for example.

But I do think this is something that writers should factor in when considering whether to go indie. For me, having this publishing family means a great deal. It’s worth it to me to sacrifice some independence and financial gain to have it. I know not everyone needs that. At this time in my live, however, I know I do.

Back Off, Man – I’m a Scientist!

Rogue's ParadiseBy Jeffe Kennedy

This is release week for Rogue’s Paradise, the third book in my Covenant of Thorns trilogy. The first book, Rogue’s Pawn, came out just over two years ago, in July of 2012. It was the first novel I wrote and first published – which took a long time, as the genre of Fantasy Romance wasn’t as well known when I first started shopping it. So, this feels like the end of a long adventure for me.

Or, maybe more accurate, a lovely stopping-off point to catch my breath and enjoy the view.

As the last two years have passed, the series has slowly gained readers, largely by word of mouth, which has been interesting to observe. One thing that struck me over time was the consistent misinterpretation people made.

I’d describe the book – or series – as being about “a scientist is trapped in Faerie.” If their eyes didn’t glaze over or roll, I’d go on to explain about the magic, the struggle to gain power and control, the bargain to bear a firstborn child for Rogue, a fae lord. At this point, far more people than I imagined would furrow their brows and say “firstborn child? How can he have a baby?”

See, they heard “scientist” and thought “male.”

It was funny to me, because it had never once occurred to me that people would have that problem. To me, the books were obviously heroine-centric – written in 1st person POV – so when I described the plot in terms of what happened to my scientist, I figured people would know that was my heroine. I might have made the implicit assumption, too, that of course people would recognize that my scientist was a woman because I, myself, am a female scientist.

Alas, no.

Still, it’s been instructive. And a great adventure.

If you’re interested in checking out the trilogy, you can enter to win any of the books over at one of my other group blogs, Here Be Magic.

Wrapping Up a Trilogy

By Jeffe Kennedy

Rogue'sParadiseA couple of weeks ago I was privileged beyond belief to hear one of my longtime heroes speak – fantasy writer Stephen R. Donaldson. He read and discussed his lifetime of work at Bubonicon.

I also got to be a guest author at the same event, making it all that much more tingly.

I started reading Donaldson when I was an adolescent and voraciously consumed anything fantasy. Well, really, any books at all. But I was tremendously keen on Anne McCaffrey, who I’d discovered on the library shelf. Looking back, it’s pretty clear that my family members must have gone into bookstores and said what I liked, and the savvy booksellers said things like, “Here, buy her the Thomas Covenant trilogy.” (Which is as many as he’d written back then.)

This was a bit scattershot because, as any of you know who’ve read both that series and The Dragonriders of Pern, there’s quite a large gulf between the two. In fact, I really struggled with Thomas Covenant. I just hated the protagonist and had a hard time understanding the story. This was long before the interwebz and nobody else I knew read those books, so it was only many years later that I found out that everyone struggled with disliking that protagonist. And that the books had very likely been too advanced for even my precocious 12 year old brain.

Then I discovered Mordant’s Need. I’d grown up a bit and, best of all, the protagonist was a woman. Not many fantasy and sci fi books had women as central characters back then. I know because I searched most of them out. Even the prolific Anne McCaffrey couldn’t write as fast as I could read. I branched into other genres and discovered romance, which always featured strong focus on the female characters. But the two Mordant’s Need books, The Mirror of Her Dreams and A Man Rides Through, gave me a very interesting, believable heroine and all the thrilling worldbuilding of the best fantasy.

I got to tell Stephen Donaldson this very thing, face to face, lo these many years later. And he smiled, being a delightful person and replied, “I always thought I should have gotten more credit for that.”

Indeed he should.

He also talked some about what it’s like to end an epic series. The Thomas Covenant Chronicles finally wound up at ten books. He gave this terrific analogy of how it felt, as if he’d been gutted. That, on one level, he knew he’d finished, but he also went about in a daze for a long time, unable to fully process that fact. The reality of it only hit him much later, when he started functioning as a human being again.

Only he said it much better.

It made me feel much better, because – in my own small way – that’s exactly what I’ve gone through in finishing up my own covenant books. Rogue’s Paradise, the third book in my Covenant of Thorns trilogy, comes out September 8. And it feels like this very strange concatenation of events that I met Donaldson at this time, with my series having this completely unintentional name-parallel to his, as it’s culminating what has easily been a ten-year journey.

From writing the first book, Rogue’s Pawn, which was the first novel I ever wrote, which took years and tears to sell, which finally came out in July of 2012, to this moment – seeing the final book hit the shelves – feels like the conclusion of a long journey.

One I have very mixed feelings about.

Because, here I sit, thinking that maybe I’m not done with that world. That, though finishing that third book left me hollowed out and like the walking dead for some time, I want to do more with my characters and that world.

I understand how Donaldson ended up writing ten of them.

And I only hope I should be so lucky and maybe live up to the example set by my hero.