Volunteers Make it Happen At Colorado Gold

We're seven weeks into the year, and workshop proposals are rolling in. Our selection committee is keeping busy reading through all the outlines, doing their best to decide which proposals will make it onto the schedule in 2017.

Like the rest of the conference staff, the proposal selection committee is made up of volunteers. And if you read any of our emails, or spend any time on our website, you know we're always on the lookout for new people to get involved and be a part of the action.

Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers' mission is simple:

RMFW is a non-profit, volunteer-run organization dedicated to supporting, encouraging, and educating writers seeking publication in commercial fiction.

As a volunteer-run organization, RMFW can only remain beneficial to members through our volunteers’ contributions. Volunteers strengthen our community and nurture an environment of members helping members. Are you thinking about getting involved, and volunteering with RMFW? Listen to what some of our volunteers have to say about their experiences:

"Volunteering is more rewarding for the volunteer than the organization."

"[Through RMFW] I've learned how to find and build my community."

"I've learned how to speak in public, organize big events and, from hanging out with talented writers, I've learned much about writing. RMFW has helped me find my voice, both in the real world and on the page."

The success of our Colorado Gold Conference is dependent on the critical services provided by our volunteers. Each person who helps out keeps our costs down and makes a difference. Also, volunteering doesn't require huge time commitments; even the smallest jobs help us provide an exceptional experience for all attendees year after year.

"The more you put into something, the more you’ll get out of it. I credit RMFW as the one organization above all others that helped me get published."

"My first attendance at the Gold conference thoroughly impressed me, and I knew then that RMFW was the place to be if I was serious about my writing. Volunteering was a way of showing my commitment to the organization and a great way to meet people."

"...if you’re an introvert, serving as a volunteer is a wonderful way of stepping outside your shell."

Volunteering is all about giving back. Remember when you were new and nervous at the conference? Think about the people who helped you. Think about the impact they had on your conference experience. By volunteering, you bring that same experience to others. A win-win for you and the recipient of your goodwill.

"As writer I have benefited from what I have learned at the Saturday workshops, Gold Conference, and critique groups and I wanted to a way to give back."

"Honestly, I've met great people who have become valued friends and I have had a ton of fun."

What would the conference be like without volunteers? Everyone at conference needs something, be it guidance or just an extra pencil. Volunteers bring people together and ensure that everyone has a great time.

"First and foremost, meeting other writers is a great benefit to volunteering. It's a good feeling, too, to know that the volunteer work we do helps other writers on their journeys."

"The Colorado Gold conference is an important part of what RMFW does to support writers and helping the conference run smoothly results in a more valuable experience for everyone!"

Studies conducted on the effects of volunteering have shown that giving time to nonprofits makes us healthier. Boost your own self-confidence through volunteering at this year’s conference. With a sense of well-being, you’ll have a greater focus on learning.

"I want to give back to an organization that has helped me become a better writer. From the critique groups, to the free Saturday programs and even the yearly conference, my writing skills have improved because of my membership in RMFW."

"Being a volunteer allows me to expand my tribe. I am convinced that to be good at anything, you need to be around other people who do that skill better than you... If you want to grow in the craft of writing, don't just join RMFW, volunteer!"

Volunteering promotes personal growth, and your volunteer service adds to your professional experience. You are guaranteed to learn something new while you give your time.

Need an opportunity to come out of your shell and improve your social skills? If you don’t know many writers, volunteering at conference gives you an opportunity to meet people at a reduced stress level.

"Without the support of RMFW, and the friends I've made there, I'm not sure I would be a published author today."

"Attending the conference is fabulous from an educational perspective, but if you want to make the most of the time, and make more friends, you need to get involved."

"Volunteering takes you off the sidelines and helps even shy people get to know the other authors and participants much better."

Any time is the right time to volunteer for RMFW because we always need volunteers. We are one big community of writers helping writers. The more involved you are in our community the more you will receive in return.

"Volunteering is an excellent way to meet people and expand your network of writers. You'll discover that writers come from all paths and roads and freeways of life--the creative mind knows no limits."

"Volunteering is also a way to share your passion in a different way, and give back to an organization that offers so much to every person who asks for support or assistance."

"Whether you spend a few hours once a year, or a few hours every month, volunteers are cherished and appreciated at RMFW, and you'll feel the goodness."

We want your help, but before you join us, ask yourself what you want to get out of volunteering:

What skills do you bring to the table?
How much time are you willing to commit?
Are you looking to do something new and different?
Do you want to work behind the scenes or with people?
Would you like to try something outside your comfort zone?

Volunteering with RMFW is a valuable opportunity to support fellow members, learn new skills, and form friendships. Contact Angela La Voie at volunteer@rmfw.org and include 'RMFW Volunteer' in the Subject line to join our community of volunteers. Not sure how you want to help? Send an email to Angela for suggestions. RMFW has lots of opportunities that meet your expertise, even if your expertise is limited to stuffing envelopes! We thrive on volunteers and want your help.

 

The RMFW Spotlight is on Lisa Manifold, Newsletter Editor

Now that we have so many new members of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Board of Directors, we'll once again be featuring the RMFW Spotlight on the blog. Our goal is to introduce our board members to all our readers and encourage other RMFW members to offer their time and energy to this energetic and growing community of writers.

2015_Lisa ManifoldToday the spotlight is on Lisa Manifold, author of the Sisters Of The Curse series

1. Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I am the Newsletter Editor. Prior to this, I was the Hospitality Chair. I got involved with RMFW because my writing, and my thoughts on how to be a writer, and be successful, changed for the better due to joining RMFW. I wanted to give something back to the organization that helped me so much.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

I recently released Thea’s Tale, which is Book One in my Sisters Of The Curse series. By the end of August, I’ll have a novella, One Night At The Ball, and Book Two, Casimir’s Journey, in the same series available. I’m working on finishing up both projects right now. They are all available on Amazon digitally and in paperback.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

That’s a hard one to narrow down. There’s so much I want to do still. My kids are getting older, so a great deal of it involves them. Sail in the Caribbean is one, because I love sailing. It’s the thing I miss most about being in a landlocked state.

2015_Manifold_Thea'sTale4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

Mine would be distractions. I have to force myself off my social media, my checking of reports, marketing, reading and research paths when I’m writing. Otherwise, I get involved in something and look up and the morning is gone. It’s amazing how attuned we are to checking our media.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

The ability to create. I love being creative, of getting an idea and sitting down at my keyboard and beginning to flesh it out. I also enjoy being my own CEO. Being able to write as your career is a gift.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Finish. The. Book. Nothing else can happen until then. I’m an obsessed researcher. Before I embark on something, I read about it, and find out as much about it, whatever it is, as I can. If you’re going to focus on writing full time, it’s easy to get distracted by the ways and means of doing so. But until you finish the book, nothing else can happen.

Also, start a mailing list. Even before you finish the book.

Manifold-desk7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

My computer is in an old computer cabinet. We got it years ago to keep our toddlers away from our electronics. But I have a comfy chair, and it’s in a quiet area of the house. I actually don’t need anything other than a sticky notepad, my latest stuff from my critique group, earbuds, and pen/pencil. That’s it. Anything else, and I start to feel cluttered.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I’m bouncing between two right now, because I read when I have a little down time. The first is 5000 Words Per Hour by Chris Fox, and Take Off Your Pants by Libbie Hawker.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Lisa Manifold lives in the amazing state of Colorado. She shares her life with her husband, two children, two dogs, and one offended cat. She enjoys skiing and she adores "treasure hunting" at local thrift stores. Her other hobbies include costuming within her favorite fandoms and periods. Her family calls her 'the cruise director' in homage, of course, to a woefully under-appreciated skill.

Latest Release: Thea’s Tale, Book One of the Sisters Of The Curse series. You can learn more about Lisa at her website and Amazon author page. You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

THE POWER OF RMFW

A fellow member of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers did not see any immediate impact on the careers of those she witnessed working so hard on our all-volunteer staff, either at the annual Colorado Gold Writers Conference, nor throughout the year on our board and support positions. She asked me if I found participation in RMFW rewarding. Because of the context of the question I knew she wasn't asking whether I found it personally rewarding. What she was really asking was: Did I feel the effort and time I put into volunteering in RMFW translated in any way to book sales, or any other help for my career as a novelist.

Not at all a simple question.

You've heard, I'm sure, the term: You get out of it what you put into it. And I'm sure that's true, as far as it goes. The benefits of participation in RMFW as just an attending member are direct - E=MC2. But are the benefits for volunteering and actually participating in the operation of the organization even measurable in any instant or even short term calculation? I submit that one actually gets back much more than what they put in when actively participating in RMFW.

I post to the RMFW email loop (RMFW@yahoogroups.com) to keep members with whom I’m acquainted, but not necessarily on a direct-email basis, informed of what’s going on with me. I may not get any direct response to my posts, but doing so also helps to keep one's name out there on the loop. Your name also becomes prominent in other areas of RMFW such as the newsletter, volunteering for conference, submitting to the blog, etc. Keeping your name out there in the RMFW community does translate to your publicity, if not directly to sales, and opens doors that may not be open otherwise. Eventually guest publishing professionals – speakers, visiting editors and agents, etc. – will hear/read it. There are a million subtle ways in which this can benefit you. I’ve gotten a lot more attention (followers on Facebook and Twitter, name recognition when introducing myself at workshops and conferences, etc.) since I agreed to become a regular contributor to the RMFW blog, and I love doing it. You never know where this kind of networking might benefit you down the line.

So no, volunteering does not perhaps convert directly to sales, and I suspect that’s why things like the email loop aren't nearly as active these days as they once were. It used to be a very lively forum for discussion and debate, but lately most posters want to sell their books and that’s all. Well I assure you that while most readers of the loop scan over or even ignore ads for your books or promotions for your blog, they are eager to read other news and opinions of current events and hot publishing industry topics. The loop and other methods of keeping your name prominent in RMFW may not translate directly to sales, you never know what it might lead to indirectly down the line.

Likewise attending our free workshops and education events throughout the year. These are not just opportunities to look at an aspect of our profession from another colleague's perspective, something from which you are far more likely to learn than not, you also have the opportunity to network, to meet fellow writers and introduce yourself to them.

conference1The Colorado Gold Writers Conferences, sponsored every Fall by RMFW, is the Grande Dame of all networking opportunities the organization offers. There is no end to the openings you have to make yourself known to the organization at large, not to mention guest professionals from the publishing industry from around the country, and even, sometimes, other countries. From pitching a workshop, if you feel you have something to share with others, to volunteering to moderate workshops. You can volunteer to judge the contest, work the registration table, help in operating the pitch sessions, or just in general as a docent or information source for newcomers and other attendees. One of the best opportunities is to volunteer as a driver, to pick up and transport conference guests between the airport and the venue - here you have a good thirty minutes or more alone with one of the visiting editors, agents, or authors invited to the conference to chat with them and become acquainted. No better networking opportunity in my book.

In short, never pass up an opportunity to volunteer and participate in RMFW and get yourself and your name out there. Doors only open to you if people know who you are. And RMFW is one of the greatest local opportunities you will have to do so.

Oh, and when the doors do open, always be ready and never say no. Even if it doesn’t end up going anywhere, sooner or later one will.


Don't miss Kevin’s latest releases: the startling and engrossing series of gothic thrillers featuring vampire private detective Kathryn Desmarias, including Bloodflow, and Bloodtrail, the bestselling sequel to Bloodflow; also the wonderfully entertaining espionage thriller, Rogue Agenda.

Follow Kevin at:
Kevin's Amazon Kevin's Blog