Writing Through The Dark Times

By Robin D. Owens.

I reached the end of a book in a long series I love and found a note that the series, which the author had anticipated writing for years, had abruptly ended. She'd had a major upheaval in her life and couldn't overcome her new circumstances to reach back into the core happiness and central theme of that series and continue.

This is an epublished author and series and she designs her career. Of course, I empathized, and I'm deeply sorry that she's going through this, and I will darn well miss that series.

I know she's crafting a new life, but I think she is making a career mistake.

I've seen the promo for the new series she's writing under another name and I don't think the majority of her readers will follow her to it. Or if they do, the first book will have to be so EXTRAORDINARY, the characters so completely engaging that she'll pull her readers along, and that's a tough job. And I think her new genre is too niche to attract more than a few new readers.

Now I know something about the above. I know about writing a niche series. I know about readers following you (or not) to other series. I know about being the sole support of yourself and your family with your writing. I know about a train wreck happening in your life that changes it into a shape you'd barely imagined.

For me, in 2010, I hung onto my series (and I do write lighter, more humorous stories and that was a concern) and added a collection of stories to what I'd already contracted for.

And there is the big difference. I was contracted for more books in the two series I was writing at the time. I didn't have the luxury of walking away from them without paying back money that was mostly spent and thrashing around in legal complications.

I had to reach into myself and still pull up what I needed to continue those books, and hope that what I found inside would be sufficiently close to what my readers expected.

I'm sure if someone really analyzed my writing before and after April 2010, you'd see it's changed, perhaps gotten an edge here or there it didn't have. But one of my series, the Celta "Heart" books (all the stories have "Heart" in the title) is still continuing. The other series, Mystic Circle for Luna did not, but due more to the publisher and the changing face of publishing than my personal angst.

If I presumed to give advice to this writer (who I believe is much more successful than me), I'd tell her: fake it until you make it. Or perhaps that's not quite an exact a phrase: wring out what you can minute by minute, hour by hour, day by day and string it into a story.

Yes, writing is an emotional experience, based on inner feelings. But writing is also technique, and writers CAN be professional and carry on, especially if you have no choice.

Like I said before, you find that spot, that core of you that you reveal in bits through every story and you hang on tight to that and go there and mine it.

You also do exactly what you do during the darkISH times – the tough times we all have learned to write through. You use those processes you already have in place that work for you such as journaling (Morning Pages for those of you who follow Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way), venting to friends, afternoons away (Artist Dates), rearranging your office or going to somewhere else to write. You use everything to keep on track.

You also depend on your beta readers and critique group to see if the technique and the emotion you can put in will carry you through as you limp, then return to your stride.

With this particular writer, I think that she will find she has to go back to her previous series, first because it is a money maker, then because she loves/loved it too, and she can. And I think she will try shorter pieces first with enough of the emotional resonance of her first series until she can return. Her writing may be different, but perhaps not as much as she anticipates. Time helps.

Now, that's emotional darkness. What about LITERAL darkness? In these short days of winter light, writing can be a problem. I know it is for me. As I learned through research for my Summoning series, Denver has an average of three hundred days of sunshine a year. I have trouble writing when it's gray. Gray days are for snuggling and reading.

Personally (and I don't know the facts), this November and December have seemed grayer for me, and I've struggled, but, again, I have procedures in place and have instituted new ones. These work for me: a full spectrum light on my desk; taking a walk in the sunshine if/when it appears and if it doesn't taking a walk in the gray; writing with friends: online in a war room, sprints on twitter, and in person.

Or grab yourself some strong coffee (or tea), some music that will put you in the mood, and just march forward word by word, phrase by phrase, sentence by sentence.

May all your writing dreams come true and may next year be even better than this year!

Robin

Robin D. Owens
RITA® Award Winning novelist Robin D. Owens credits the telepathic cat with attitude in selling her first futuristic/fantasy romance, HeartMate, published in December 2001. Since then she has written fourteen books in the series, Heart Fire the latest in November 2014.

Her five book Luna series included average American women Summoned into another dimension to save a world. Her Mystic Circle series was a mixture of contemporary urban and romantic fantasy set in Denver.

And her newest stories, about an uptight accountant who sees Old West ghosts and helps them move on, started with Ghost Seer in April 2014. She is profoundly thankful to be recipient of the 2004 Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers’ Writer of the Year award as well as the 2011 Writer of the Year Award, the Colorado Romance Writers Lifetime Achievement Award and the 2010 Best Paranormal and Best of the Best Daphne Du Maurier Award. More about Robin on her website.

11 thoughts on “Writing Through The Dark Times

  1. “Or grab yourself some strong coffee (or tea), some music that will put you in the mood, and just march forward word by word, phrase by phrase, sentence by sentence.”
    That’s exactly what I’m doing. I’m in the revision stage on my first novel. The gray days and Holidays do take a toll on my energy. But I remain determined to finish. And since I work full-time, somedays all I can do is get through one paragraph. But even that little bit helps me. It puts me just that much closer to finishing and keeps the feeling going of being a Writer.

  2. Thank you, Robin, for sharing your experience. Your post hits home just as I need it. Best of new years to you as well.

  3. I’ve been lucky enough not to have the dark times, but unfortunately, I also haven’t gotten those processes in place. Reading this had made me realize I need to get more process because the time will come when I really need to rely on it to keep me going forward into and through the dark.Thanks for a very “enlightening” blog.

  4. I’m seriously struggling with writing now. Health issues are always on my mind and it hinders my creativity. How do you get past that?

    • Health issues are hard to beat. I’d check out your writing space, make it as comfortable and healthy as possible with good air, ergonomic chair and other set up. Figure out how much you might be able to write in spurts and don’t overdo. If you are having trouble with a keyboard, consider handwriting, or even dictation and a transcription software program. Another thing you might try is gentle yoga (physical) and meditation (mental/emotional/spiritual),again in acceptable time blocks.

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