The Only Writing Advice You Really Need

By Mary Gillgannon

I recently read a blog by a newly published writer about rejection. Her worst one came from an editor who basically suggested she quit writing: “You cannot write, you have no talent, and I prefer not to be bothered anymore.” Ouch.

But the point of the blog was that the writer ignored the total put-down, kept writing and ended up having her book published. As part of her blog tour, she tells her story, the many moments of self-doubt, the sense of defeat, the struggle with depression. She ends with this heartfelt advice: “Listen to me, new writers, and listen carefully. Repeat after me: I will not give up. I can take a break. I can change the genre. I can even go on vacation. But I will not give up! Repeat that to yourself daily.”

Wonderful advice, and not only for “pre-published” writer. Many multi-published writers struggle to keep going as well. You can have several books out and seem to be on your way, and then it all falls to pieces. Once again you face the dreaded specter of failure and futility you thought you’d banished when you got published.

In fact, of the writers I know who have “given up” (at least temporarily) this is the more common scenario. They did well in the beginning, but career reversals and market and editorial changes demoralized them to the point that they put aside their writing for months or even years. When you’re unpublished, you at least have a clear goal to work toward and that can keep you going a long time. But when your career path starts to resemble walking through quicksand, it can be even more difficult to maintain that passion and drive and keep fighting onward.

This was brought home to me last weekend when I got together with a good writer friend who has changed genres and is facing a slump in sales. The result is that she is currently without a contract after thirty-some years of being published. I know that this is temporary and she’ll find her way. And she knows it, too. But I’m pretty sure she’s experienced some moments of self-doubt and occasionally wonders whether it’s all worth it. The one thing on her side is that she’s changed her career direction a few times already, and she knows that there’s only one thing you can do: Find a new pathway and keep slogging forward, i.e., never give up.

But that’s not to say that sometimes it isn’t a good idea to take a break. Pull off to the side on your writing journey and rest a while. That’s what another writer friend is doing. For the last few years she’s faced serious health problems, while still keeping her writing career going. Despite surgeries, doctor appointments and chemo, she’s forced herself to meet deadlines and obligations and even write proposals to get new contracts. But after a long battle on two fronts, she’s finally decided it’s time for a rest. She needs to get the joy of writing back. The thrill of creation and the excitement of having your characters and story come to life. And she’s realized the only way to do that is to stop pushing herself.

But it will only be a vacation, a chance to give herself a little breathing room. To stop worrying about deadlines or how many pages she’s written. For her, the pathway forward right now means staying in the same place and catching her breath. But she won’t stop writing altogether, because long ago she also took those magic words to heart:  Never give up.

The blog post that inspired this one can be found at: http://www.wildwomenauthorsx2.blogspot.com

WAR IN FICTION

By Kevin Paul Tracy

I've spent the past three posts discussing elements of politics in fiction, somewhat focused on world-building, which is often considered an activity of the speculative fiction writer, but I submit is also a job for any crafter of mysteries, adventures, thrillers, etc. who wants to provide a solid plot line that fulfills and satisfies readers. It is time to move on from political intrigue, or spies and terrorists, to full-scale war in fiction.

waterlooMost of us have written the occasional (or frequent) action scene - fist fights, exchanges of gunfire, and various forms of chase scenes. But few have the occasion to relate a full scale battlefield clash between two forces numbering in the hundreds or thousands or hundreds of thousands. To some the task may seem daunting, but if you keep in mind that, in the end, even chapters about massive combat are still ultimately about characters the readers have, hopefully by this point, come to care about, the task becomes manageable, if no less complex.

The challenge is to relate the larger events of the battle, the strategy and tactics, the turn of advantage, the ebb and flow of victory and defeat, while still keeping the very small, individual, human element integral to the narrative. I suggest planning for the battle comes at the very beginning of story craft - in the outline phase for the entire book. If you know this book is going to have a large-scale battle in it, you have some elbow room to plan ahead. Introduce characters whose diverse occupations and roles are going to be useful in giving the reader insight into the various aspects of the conflict later. In a medieval setting, for example, introduce the Kings and Generals early in the story, but also perhaps a squire, perhaps a message runner, an infantryman or two, and perhaps a conscientious princess or lowly midwife who might become a nurse to the injured or a beacon of leadership to refugees, etc. These do not have to be major characters, and they do not necessarily have to hold the roles at the very beginning of the book, as long as they are in place when the conflict starts so that we can turn to them from time to time during the battle for their very personal, human dramas amidst the larger backdrop of war.

Characters in place now, the battle starts. A battle is kind of like a tide at the beach, it ebbs one way, flows another, breaks against hard forces such as rocks, then tumbles past soft forces like shells or seaweed. Think of writing your battle sequence like a tide. Start with a bird's-eye view, giving us the larger context, the state of war as it begins, then rush down into the midst of it and focus on the actions and consequences of one of the characters established earlier. At an appropriate point, preferably upon a cliff-hanger, zoom your storytelling camera back out to the thousand foot view again, tell us how the tide of battle has shifted, who is advancing and who retreating. Then, dive back down again, choose another character whose very personal story gives us a context-filled experience that affects us and keeps us engaged.

And so it should continue - wide-shot, then close-up, wide-shot, then close-up, keeping us apprised of the progress of the larger war at hand, while simultaneously keeping us engaged on a deeper, much more character-driven level. If done well, the reader comes away from your book with a fulsome sense of satisfaction, that they were able to follow the impact of the greater events at hand because they were also given the very personal, individual micro-view of how those larger events affected individuals they cared about.


Don't miss Kevin’s latest releases: the startling and engrossing series of gothic thrillers featuring vampire private detective Kathryn Desmarias, including Bloodflow, and Bloodtrail, the upcoming sequel to Bloodflow to be release 4/15/2015; also the wonderfully entertaining espionage thriller, Rogue Agenda.

Follow Kevin at:
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Guest Post – Cindi Myers: Setting Fire to Dollar Bills

By Cindi Myers

Julie Kazimer’s article about her experience paying for a blog tour prompted a lot of great comments, including mine that I could write a long list of promotional efforts I’ve wasted money on over the years. This led Julie to ask me to elaborate in a blog post, so here I am.

My list of promo efforts that turned out to be money wasted – for me. YMMV.

1. Paid blog tour. Julie pretty much covered this when she shared her experience.

2. Hired a publicist. The publicist I hired worked really hard trying to get media coverage for the book she was promoting (Learning Curves). The book got a starred review from Publisher’s Weekly and was featured on the cover of PW so I figured that would help generate a little buzz, right? She sent out a boatload of press releases and managed to get the book mentioned in In Style magazine. So yes, she did her job. The problem? I spent a lot of money on these services and the book totally flopped in sales. In fact, it never earned back its modest advance.

3. Paid for giveaways at conferences. I had really adorable hot pink tape measures made to promote Learning Curves. People loved them. Did they sell more books? No. Were they expensive? Yes. Since then, I’ve done my share of postcards, magnets, pens, bookmarks, etc. When I moved last year I threw out tons of this stuff –everything from tote bags to drink Koozies that authors had spent money to have imprinted with their book info. While it’s nice to have a bookmark or business card to give someone who asks about your book, I’ve never bought a book because of a giveaway tchotchke. You can waste a ton of money on this stuff and most of it will end up in the trash soon after it is received.

4. Print ads. I’ve done ads in RT Magazine and other romance-oriented magazines, both group ads and single ads. They’re usually very pricey and as far as I could tell they had absolutely zero impact on sales.

5. Book trailers. Unless you have something really unique and share-worthy (I still remember Mario’s Lego book trailer from years ago) your average book trailer is not going to get you much attention from anyone but your friends and relatives.

So that’s my short-list of things that I feel were wastes of money and time – for me. I’d love to hear if you’ve had better results from these kinds of things. Next blog, I’ll share some promo efforts that yielded better results.

 

Cindi Myers sold her first book in 1997 and since then has had “somewhere north of 60” books published. Currently, she writes romantic suspense for Harlequin Intrigue, women’s fiction for Kensington Books, and self-publishes historical romance under the pen name Cynthia Sterling.

The One True Constant in Publishing … by Kristi Helvig

Kristi Helvig It’s a busy time for me as I gear up for the release of my sequel STRANGE SKIES at the end of April. I’m writing a slew of guest posts and doing interviews for my blog tour, planning the launch at my favorite local indie bookstore, Tattered Cover, and trying to manage the various giveaways going on right now for both my books. All of these things are similar to what I did one year ago for the release of my debut BURN OUT.

The biggest difference this time around? No, it’s not that I’m so much wiser and more time efficient (I wish). It’s that right after my book was sent for the hardcover printing, my editor at Egmont USA found out that my publishing house—not a tiny publisher either— was closing down. As in, less than a week after we spoke on the phone and celebrated finishing all the final edits, my editor said she wouldn’t have a job after the end of the week. Many authors found out that their books were cancelled.

I got lucky in that they decided to bump up my release date several months so that my book would still be published. I felt this weird mix of sadness for the awesome people of Egmont and my fellow Egmont authors, along with happiness that my book would still make it out into the world.

book-burnoutPeople asked me if I was okay, and what was I going to do after this book. My honest answer was that I was fine and that I trusted the right thing would happen for all my future books. I’d already had my first editor move publishing houses while BURN OUT was still in copyedits, and then my agent moved agencies within the same few weeks—though she took me with her, it meant that these two books had to stay with my original agency. After we got the news about Egmont closing, I spoke with my agent and we talked about my self-publishing the third book in the trilogy, which was a prospect that really excited me. And then, two weeks later, something else happened, seemingly out of the blue.

Lerner Publishing had acquired Egmont’s Spring 2015 list and just like that, I have a new publisher. I’ve already had a marketing call with them and am really impressed so far.

Helvig_strange skiesSo, what’s the lesson here? That the biggest constant in publishing is change. If you follow the publishing industry news, you’ll see a plethora of articles on publishers merging, publishers closing, editors moving to different houses, etc. The great thing is that the majority of the people who work in publishing are awesome and are in the industry because they love books.

What’s a writer to do? Keep writing, keep improving, keep seeking any and all means of publication and continue to support your fellow writers however you can. I believe it’s a great time to be an author—we have more choices than ever and if we focus on what is within our control, we’re going to be just fine.

GIVEAWAY: Enter the Goodreads giveaway through April 3rd for a chance to win one of 10 Advanced Copies of STRANGE SKIES!

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Kristi Helvig is a Ph.D. clinical psychologist turned sci-fi/fantasy author. Her first novel, BURN OUT (Egmont USA), which Kirkus Reviews called “a scorching series opener not to be missed,” follows 17-year-old Tora Reynolds, one of Earth’s last survivors, when our sun burns out early.

In the sequel, STRANGE SKIES, coming 4/28/2015, Tora makes it to a new planet only to discover a whole new host of problems—and the same people who still want her dead.

Order Kristi’s books through Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or your favorite local retailer. Kristi muses about Star Trek, space monkeys, and other assorted topics on her blog at www.kristihelvig.com and Twitter (@KristiHelvig). You can also find her on Facebook. Kristi resides in sunny Colorado with her hubby, two kiddos, and behaviorally-challenged dogs.

Writing Undercover … by Tina Ann Forkner

Recently I was cleaning out some electronic files and noticed an old draft of a novel I’d abandoned in favor of another manuscript. My hand hovered over the delete key. I was about to send it to the trash bin when I decided to give it a quick read. I’m glad I did. The draft was pretty long and was I surprised to find myself newly intrigued with the story. It was a good idea! I decided not to delete the draft, but instead to resurrect the story and work on it on the side.

Do you have a story idea, or a secret manuscript that you go to when you are stuck on your current Work in Progress? If not, then you might consider creating a file that you can go to when nothing else is working. Let it be a story that would surprise the socks off your friends. Let it be so “you” that at first, you would never dream of showing it to anyone. Let it be a place for your writing soul to escape.

In the past I had a private manuscript that nobody else knew about. It was just for fun and I wrote on it when I had so-called writer’s block or when I was bored with my current project. Even when I was writing under contract, I worked on that story. In most ways, the manuscript I escaped to was a lot different than what I was writing under contract for Random House. It had a completely different setting, a bigger cast of characters, and the best part was that I didn’t feel a need to censor myself in any way. Nobody was ever going to see it, right? In the end, I wrote a novel called Waking Up Joy that ultimately put me back in the driver’s seat of my writing career, but more importantly than that, writing it undercover gave me my mojo back.

Sometimes, when we are going through the publishing phase, or when we are busily writing and pitching proposals at writing conferences hoping to get published, we unwittingly start cheating ourselves by letting the business of writing pull us away from the writing zone. You know what I mean by ‘the writing zone’, right? It’s what happens when the world around you falls away and the writing flow pulls you down the river of inspiration. It’s hard to find the writing zone when you are trying to plan your story around current publishing trends or with the expectations of editors and agents judging it. So, my advice? Write something that nobody can touch. Write undercover. You might be surprised at how doing so frees the storyteller locked within.

The beauty of writing Waking Up Joy undercover was that 1) I remembered how to be true to myself no matter what I write, and 2) I gained the confidence to take greater chances in my manuscripts.

Additionally, the idea that I wasn’t going to pitch the novel to anyone, but was writing it for myself, allowed me to find the writing zone. At first I fully expected that I would never pitch the novel, and in all honesty that would have been okay. The whole point of writing undercover was to explore the craft and see what else I was capable of writing, but when I realized that my practice manuscript was a story I wanted to bring to my readers, I started showing the first fifty pages to agents and editors.

Now, even though I’m writing under contract for my new publisher, I know it’s time to go undercover again. I don’ t know if this secret manuscript will turn out to be something worth shopping, or if it will only be a manuscript that teaches me more about myself and writing, but I again feel a longing to go back to that secret place in my soul where I don’t write for anyone except Tina Ann Forkner.

If you find that like me, you sometimes freeze at the idea of writing something to show an editor or agent, let alone the world, start a secret manuscript and write something you’ve never written before. Write a story that flows out of your soul without the intention of ever showing it to anyone else, write a memoir, or write a story that might seem out of character to your friends, but that you know is all you. Whatever you do, start with the intention of writing it undercover.

It might end up that your secret manuscript is something you want to share, but don’t write it for that reason. Most likely your manuscript will be a learning tool that will give you a release from your regular writing projects, like going to the playground when you should be at work. Perhaps in the process you will reconnect with your muse and in the end become a better writer. This what I’m hoping will happen to me again as I dig back into that lost manuscript I unearthed when I was cleaning out my files. I’m going undercover. Ready?
Let’s go…

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Tina Ann ForknerTina Ann Forkner writes Women’s Fiction and is the author of Waking Up Joy, Rose House, and Ruby Among Us. A southern girl at heart, she writes in Cheyenne, Wyoming where she lives with her husband and their three teens.

Learn more at www.tinaannforkner.com

Why You Should Vote for the WOTY   

By Liesa Malik

writeroftheyearOkay, friends, here’s the low down, the scoop, the real deal – the WOTY is fixed! That’s right. Fixed! And you know why? Because each year three distinguished authors willing to represent our organization with their work end up on a ballot that is under-supported.

It’s rather like local elections. According to Governing Magazine,  during a study by the University of Wisconsin, researchers found a steady decline in voter turn out. Not great at 26.6% in 2001, by 2011, that turnout declined to 20.9%. That’s roughly one in five people who took advantage of the American electoral process. These minorities of voters influence how we’re being governed today.

What has this to do with the Writer of the Year? Plenty. I don’t have any exact figures, but in checking with people involved in the voting process last year, most of our group did not vote for the WOTY. Shame on us all!

WHY THE WOTY MATTERS

The Writer of the Year is someone who represents the highest standards of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers organization and represents our organization throughout the publishing industry. I spoke with Shannon Baker, the 2014 Writer of the year and she said that winning this distinction was life changing.

“Right before the nominations last year, I was ready to quit writing,” said Shannon. “I felt defeated. But the nominating process boosted my confidence, and the vote validated that newfound interest in continuing to write. Not only that, but being able to put the Writer of the Year title behind my name has opened a lot of doors for me.”

She mentioned that she was recently requested to speak at the CU Friends of the Library annual district event. It was a dream come true, yet Shannon said she didn’t approach this group, they contacted her.

Also, at every event, speaking engagement, and book sale (and more of these opportunities come up for the WOTY), Shannon says she does her best to put in a promotion of RMFW.

“I think it’s very important for the Writer of the Year to speak well and knowledgeably about this great organization we’re all a part of. If the Writer of the Year cannot or will not do this, why should they be voted to that honor?”

We hope that at some point, winning the WOTY would be similar to winning a Pulitzer Prize, but until that happens, everyone who is part of RMFW still has a certain celebrity, albeit a tad smaller, for people who love to read.

WHO IS THIS WRITER OF THE YEAR CANDIDATE?

To make finalist, a person must fulfill these hefty qualifications:

  • Be a traditionally published author with a book released in the previous year (in this case, the 2015 WOTY has had a book release in 2014)
  • The WOTY winner is a member in good standing with Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers—while the WOTY is NOT an award recognizing volunteerism (that’s what the Jasmine is for), being active in our community is important too. After all, the Writer of the Year is representing us all in the larger publishing industry.
  • Have a high quality of writing. This may seem like a duh point, but the vetting committee read samplings of each author and had to distinguish candidates based on critical reviews of their work. Talk about hard work! So many great pieces of commercial fiction writing, so few slots we could fill. Whew!
  • Offer proof of significant achievements with their writing work—regional or national reviews or, awards, guest blogs and more.

Every time someone meets the WOTY, they’re being introduced to Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers as a whole. This makes your writing platform even stronger when you mention that you’re part of our organization. Free publicity. How cool is that?

OLD WRITERS’ TALES

In years past, I felt much like you might be feeling today. That is, I didn’t know the writers personally, hadn’t read their works for the most part, and felt that some secret inner circle of friends put together the nomination list in a smoke-filled back room of political dealings.

Sorry to burst your literary dreaming, but this isn’t how things work. The same people are not nominated year after year. In fact, we haven’t had a WOTY become part of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writer’s Hall of Fame. The one qualification for that distinction is to win the WOTY three times. While there have been a number of two-time winners, no one has made the top selection three times.

How things really work is that an author can either be nominated or apply to the WOTY committee for consideration. After all nominations are closed, the WOTY committee of at least five members spends approximately two hours per candidate, reading the application form, checking out websites, and most importantly, reading and evaluating a piece of the writer’s work. This year, with as many candidates as we had, this means that about 135 volunteer hours went into narrowing the distinguished field to just three names.

WHO ARE THE 2015 NOMINEES?

Please watch for the April newsletter when the finalists will be announced. Then, beginning April 20th be sure to vote.

HOW TO VOTE

This year we’re going to try something new. Although you will still have two months to make your decision, we’re hoping to implement voting online via the RMFW website. Please keep an eye on your emails for more information.

And what if you haven’t read the nominees’ work? Try visiting your local library, or you could go onto the major bookseller sites to at least read a sampling of the work. I think you’ll be pleased if you do.

Be sure to read the author profiles that will be a part of the newsletter announcement. I think you’ll agree that we’re lucky to have such high quality writers in our community.

Still think the WOTY is a sham or a fix? The only way you’ll know for sure is to sign in and vote. Personally, I’m excited for all of the nominees and only wish we could select from everyone who sent author information.

Think I’ll go try to up my own level of writing. Someday I'd like to qualify . . . for a WOTY .

GOING ROGUE – THE INDIE REVOLUTION OF AARON MICHAEL RITCHEY

By Aaron Ritchey

I have become like Kurtz in the Congo.

I have gone native.  I am living in a hut, out in the jungle, and I’m writing books that don't have the approval of the British elite in London.

The horror!  The horror!

But do you know what?  It’s awesome and scary and nerve-wracking and freeing and sometimes I feel like Prometheus and sometimes I feel like the eagle eating Prometheus’s liver and sometimes I feel like Prometheus’s liver.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 started like any normal day. I was struggling.  I’d gotten back some wicked, flesh-eating edits from an editor, and I’d gotten some ass-smacking criticism from one of my beta readers, and lastly, the small press who published my first novel The Never Prayer was going under.  On March 31, 2015, I was going to get my rights back.

I had always planned on going to another small publisher once my contract ended, and yet, on that Tuesday, I talked with my lovely wife and discussed the pros and cons.  Many of which I blogged about on this very blog – http://rmfw.org/get-big-by-going-small-the-top-five-reasons-to-publish-with-a-small-press.

Here’s the thing, a small press can be great—editing help, marketing help, cover help. But do you know what?  I think even more important, at least for me, was that it was another person in the world who believed in me.  Finding editors, cover artists, marketing help, all that takes only a bit of time and money.  But finding someone to believe in you?  That's priceless.

But how much is it worth?  Is it worth 30%, 50%, 70% of your royalties?  Is it worth someone else’s timeline?  Is it worth the waiting, the headaches, the general hassle of trying to squeeze yourself into someone’s else’s to-do list?  Because when you are with a publisher, you become a line item on someone’s to-do list, and unless you are bringing in fat stacks of cash, you aren’t their highest priority.  Even the ones that love your stuff.

No one will work harder on your writing career than you.  No one.  Unless, of course, you are making mad money, and then people will come out of the woodwork to “help” you.

On that fateful Tuesday, my wife and I decided we wanted to take hold of the reins. I still have other publishers I’m working with, but I am seizing control of my first three novels, including my newest novel which will hit the streets May 7, 2015.  You are all invited to the party at Hanson’s.

The name of my new publishing company will be Black Arrow Publishing because my stories have been forged by my father and his father before him.  The true king under the mountain.  And I aim to take down dragons.  Oh yes.

But in many ways, I have it easy.  I’ve had four publishers of various sizes like my work and want to publish it.  That really helps me.  I have huge respect for those authors who went Indie and they never had that kind of validation.  They have big ol' huevos of iron.

Still, it was hard for me to take this leap.

Part of it goes back to the original dream I had of becoming rich and famous.  I so wanted the huge literary agent, the six-figure book deal, the advance, the book tour, the Gulfstream personal jet, the whole Stephen King dream.

Going Indie meant having to mourn that dream all over again.  I wasn’t a princess in a castle adored by the big-five publishers.  I was just me.  Just a writer.

But who are my books for?  Are they for agents, editors, presses big, small, and in-between?

Not really.

In the end, my books are for the world and for the readers who read them.  I don’t know why I haven’t been loved and adored by millions.  I mean, my books seem to be well-written and people like them.  Goes back to validation.  Which I’m learning is cheap, cheaper than an empty Coke can in the gutter.

I still like the idea of the agent, the big publisher, the glory and teeth-gashing of that game.  And some of my projects will eventually go that route.

But other stories?  Man, I want to write books.  I want to write a lot of books.  And I’m tired of waiting on other people to help me get my books out into the world.

The time is now.

I’m going rogue.  I’ll get a developmental editor (Vivian Trask), a copy editor (Chris Devlin), a cover artist (Natasha Brown), and a formatter (Quincy J. Allen).  I’ll get help.

And with that help, I’ll shoot arrows at the sun, baby.

I’ll bring that star down and put it in my pocket.

Dancing About Architecture

music-girl-wallpapers-headphones-hair

By Colleen Oakes

"Writing about music is like dancing about architecture."

Having the right music while I'm writing is of the utmost importance.  In so many ways, it elevates the craft of writing, and it stimulates my brain in a way that nothing else can. Except for maybe, you know, writing.

When I wrote Elly in Bloom, the music I listened to had a lot of influence on the mood in my scenes.  For the happy, wedding-filled chapters, I listened to buzzy pop music, or bouncy-women-driven songs (Ingrid Michaelson,  Sia, Sara Evans, Carrie Underwood, Brooke Fraser).  When I had to take Elly down into her betrayal and the anger, it was all about Kelly Clarkson's "My December", a melodramatic and angry album that captured the depths of betrayal and the rage of a woman betrayed.

That album had everything I needed, and if I were to name "an album for Elly", that would be it. Towards the end of the book, I listened to Lifehouse's "Breathing" on repeat. There was just something sweet and lovely and old school about it, and I wanted to capture this new blossoming that was happening in Elly's life, and the hope that I wanted to carry into the sequel.

For Queen of Hearts, it was a totally different story. I could not write - well, anyway - to music with words. I needed grand and epic music, music that stimulated my imagination in the most direct way.  I didn't need Clarkson. I needed Zimmer and Williams and Elfman.

I needed movie soundtracks, and lots of them. I needed dramatic music to inspire scenes that were so big that I could only write them in a deconstructing way and then put them back together.  I needed music that made me feel angry, deceitful, rushed, panicked, terrified, betrayed, elated and devastated - all at once.

I needed music to burn a city down and to lift up a field of magical flowers.

For two years, this is what Queen of Hearts looked like: me, hunched over my little netbook at a Starbucks wishing I was at a Caribou, typing and frowning, typing and frowning, checking Pinterest, typing and frowning.  All during that time, I was graced with GIANT headphones that my husband bought me.  This let me get lost in the music, which enabled me to get lost in the book. I can truly say that without the music, Queen of Hearts would not have happened.

I would start out every writing session with the same song, something I highly recommend. Take a few hours and find that perfect piece of music, and let it lead you where you want to go. Let it be a marker that you are departing from your present reality.  My song was  A Kaleidoscope of Mathematics by James Horner: There is no other song I know that really gets my brain focused and working like this one. The quick pace of the song, and the way it climbs the scales, through quick, intense almost frantic piano notes...I can't perfectly explain it without seeming a bit unhinged, but when I close my eyes and listened to this song before I started writing Queen each time, it was like I was seeing a thousand doors unlock, one after another.  Then I saw a tree unfurling its branches and the branches became a forest, the forest a world.  My world. There is something about this song that prepares and bares my mind to consuming imagination. All the pressures of daily life fell at my feet. Yeah, it's that good.

When I begin writing a novel, I usually find a piece of music to power the climax of the novel as well. When I was writing, I would listen to the song at the end of every writing session, a bookmark, and something to look forward to. I would think "Soon, I'll get to write this amazing scene, this amazing ending."  My musical bookends. Everyone writes different, but for me, it's very important that when I write the first chapter that the last chapter is completely in my mind.  The song for the end of Queen was "Now we are Free" by Lisa Gerrad.   I knew exactly what I wanted to happen in that scene, and it sounded like this song; free, uplifting and dramatic. I listened to it leading up to the epilogue, letting it guide my writing to that spot.  It has a finality and resolution to it that resonated just right with that scene. It's so beautiful, it makes me so weepy and when i finished Queen of Hearts, I did indeed weep.

Did I ever listen to music with words?  Occasionally.  It just didn't suit this book. There is something about picking the right kind of music that rearranges the brain in a way that it's ready to write. It's ready to get lost in something, to dip its toes into the creative side of your life, your education and your passion.

My advice? It's worth the time to find the right soundtrack to your book.

I'm happy to report that even though my writing looks the same - Hunched over, typing, frowning, typing - but in my ears the cheerful beats of a new book are sounding.

A story of new beginnings and fresh words.

Never Let Them See You Sweat: Hot Chicks in Leather

By J.A. (Julie) Kazimer

According to The Wall Street Journal (my go to for all bookie news. No, really. I only look at the pictures), “On the average, a book store browser spends eight seconds looking at the front cover and 15 seconds looking at the back cover.”

What does that mean for an author?  Well, chances are if you are an urban fantasy or paranormal romance writer, your book cover will feature a chick dressed in black leather, even if your story takes place in the middle of the desert.

Don’t get me wrong. Like any girl I love tight black leather and heels. I often spend my nights dressed in the form fitting stuff and carrying extremely heavy weapons halfway tucked in my pants.

What girl doesn’t?

And we're not even discussing how one washes black leather catsuits. A secret only a dry cleaner knows.

But I digress (something I seem to do a lot around you people), my point is do these dark, sexy covers do more harm than good for authors and readers alike.

As a reader have you ever hid the cover of the book you were currently enjoying?

Ever felt ashamed of a book because of the hot chick in leather on the cover or the muscle bound hunk smeared in oil (baby not olive, I assume)?

Or have you ever picked up a book strictly because of the hot chick on the cover? Did the tale live up to the artwork?

Authors complain a lot about their covers, from little things like my main character has red hair and the woman on the cover is a blonde, to a publisher actually changing the race of the character on a cover in order to sell books to a wider demographic, a disgusting practice, but one done more often than we know.

So my question to you, my writer/readers is, do hot chicks in leather sell books? And what are some of your cover art experiences, both good and bad?

 

Want a free ebook? Visit me at jakazimer.com. Want to send me graphic pics and talk trash on social media? Friend me on Facebook or tweet me on twitter.  Please. Pretty please.

Writers, sing along with me… the heart and soul of dreams

by Janet Lane

These are the times that try writer’s souls. Are your writer’s dreams getting battered in the maelstrom of the current publishing world?

I have experienced the many frustrations of writing fiction, and I understand my fellow RMFW members’ struggles with rejections, disappointing sales, the daunting task of getting reviews or an editor or agent’s attention. It’s easy to become overwhelmed in a market that demands more and more from us.

We turn to each other for support, and our friendships with fellow writers, gifted people who share our dreams, help us right ourselves after our personal defeats and challenges. And many find solace in music. My dear friend, Robin Owens, shared some of the music that she uses for inspiration during her writing sessions, and I’ve found it beautiful and helpful.

This weekend, I got a boost of inspiration and hope from music in an unexpected place.
My daughter and her significant other gave us tickets to one of the nine Garth Brooks concerts! We’ve enjoyed his unique brand of country/crossover pop music over the years, but I would have never gone without the special enticement. At the concert, Brooks sang a song I didn’t remember ever hearing. How could I have missed this gem? It was released in April, 1992, and I was busy with my toddling daughters. I hadn’t started writing fiction then, and likely my world was too busy to hear it.

But it’s never too late! The song is “The River.” It’s about precious dreams, and our commitments to them.

Lanr_The River (Garth Brooks blog)I was far from alone in admiring this song. The Pepsi Center’s 20,000 fans roared with delight, then quieted to hear the beautiful lyrics. The Denver Post’s “Home” columnist, Francie Swidler, was there. Not a Garth Brooks fan, she was surprised to enjoy the songs and wished that she, like most of the happy fans, knew all the words. She had never heard “The River,” and to her surprise, when Garth sang it, she cried. Yes, it’s that good. She heard the heart and soul of the song.

At the time it was written (co-written by Garth and Victoria Shaw), Garth hadn’t yet found success. In fact, he worked as a bouncer in a bar to support his dream. He was seeking a new song, but the heart of the idea was just out of his reach. To get inspired, he and Victoria played some James Taylor songs. (We do this as writers when we re-charge our batteries by reading other’s novels, not to copy, but to gain inspiration). The idea came to him, and he said, “You know, a dream is like a river…”

The song is four minutes long, too long for a single release, and even after recording it, it didn’t make it on his next album. In an interview, Victoria Shaw said that might have been a good thing, because that album (minus “The River”) sold very well, and “he was so huge that people gave him the courtesy of listening. It was over four minutes. It was so different, and had it been any other artist, they would have thrown that song out.” They listened, and they loved it.

From the song ….
I’ll never reach my destination if I never try
So I will sail my vessel ‘til the river runs dry

If you’ve never heard it, you’re in for an inspirational treat, a gentle shot right to your writer’s heart. If you’ve heard it and forgotten it, listen again. It is, to this writer’s soul, heavenly.

Youtube link:

..and another great version with the beautiful lyrics on screen…

I hope you listen, and I hope it nourishes your dream like it did mine.

Even if you don’t have time for it, consider the story behind this song. The lyrics speak of dreams--you never know where they will take you. Because you dare to follow your dream, you will find many days a constant battle. We’ll never reach our destination if we never try. Letting the waters (of time) slip away jeopardizes our chances of achieving our dreams. Sometimes timing is everything. Garth has sold more than 100 million albums, and he was inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame in 2011. But back when he wrote this song, he had a choice: stand aside and let the waters slip away - or follow the dream. Had Garth not kept pursuing his dream, we would never have been able to enjoy the messages in his songs--especially this one.

???????????????????????????????Sail your vessel ‘till the river runs dry.

Where do you get inspiration? Does music play a part in charging your creative batteries?