Category Archives: Blog

6 Best Marketing Tips for Authors

By Heather Webb

Heather WebbAll authors are looking for that magic marketing formula. How much money should we spend on ads? What should our websites look like? How much time should we spend on social media? How do we distinguish ourselves amidst all of the white noise? But these are the wrong questions. The best way to establish oneself as an author, to be an effective marketing guru, isn’t quantifiable. *rips out hair* So what should an author focus on for promotion?

CULTIVATE YOUR VOICE Be yourself, which is to say, be unique! Don’t try to rip off another author’s style. It will not only feel phony to you and your readers will see that you’re trying too hard. Don’t assume they can’t tell. Give them more credit than that. A quick point about online articles and interviews—they are more informal in voice. You don’t want to sound like a stiff or a nag, or you’ll bore your readers.

BE CREATIVE Start your own writing-related services, writer group, or hashtag. Set up a bookstand with your novels at a soccer match, purchase inexpensive paraphernalia with your cover on it or maybe your character’s names. Sell it on your website, distribute it at conferences. People like stuff! Make cupcakes with your book cover on them and bring them to the day job, the community center, or the library. You get the idea. Think outside of the box.

RESEARCH A writer’s research is never finished. Pay attention to what is selling in the book market. Listen to what readers want. Track the changes happening in the industry. How will this information affect your current platform? How can you change to incorporate new trends and more importantly, to reach MORE readers? Do your research, if not daily, weekly.

Webb_Rodins LoverENGAGE Reach out! Find ways to connect to different groups of people, both in person and online. Attend conferences, book fairs, and author signings. Volunteer at writing organizations. Cheer on your fellow writers in their quest to publication. Form relationships with people. When your agent tells you to get on Twitter, what they mean to say is, TALK TO PEOPLE. Make friends. Swap anecdotes, swap war stories, or craft ideas, or gardening tips. Anything! What you’re actually doing is forming your tribe. Your tribe will gladly help promote your works because THEY LIKE YOU. Because they’re your friends. And NOT because you spammed everyone with and reviews and quotes from your novels. (I’ve avoided more book buying by seeing people clip a really horrible line from their book and posting it on Twitter or Facebook.) (Be sure to follow the 80%–20% self-promotion rule here. More writers break this rule than not, and it’s REALLY annoying.)

FOCUS ON READERS While it’s true we should be involved in our writing organizations, it’s imperative that published authors, in particular, shift the focus of their efforts toward readers. We love to get caught up talking to other writers and industry pros and traveling to conferences, but other writers aren’t your target audience. Reach out to book clubs. Purchase ads in book club newsletters. Speak at your local library. Write articles on your blog that tie in with your novels, your platform, and interesting or fun or exciting information readers would like to see. Readers talk and share these morsels with others. Word of mouth is still the single most effective method of spreading the word about your books. Direct the bulk of your efforts to getting readers talking.

WRITE AMAZING, DROOL-WORTHY BOOKS The best way to gain more readers, to harness your success, is to write more books. The kind of books that send readers on a journey, that wrench open minds with a crow bar, that break hearts. Never stop working on your craft. It’s a skill and can only improve with practice, hard work, and time.

So get writing! And remember that being yourself and building relationships are the most effective marketing tools.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Heather Webb writes historical fiction for Penguin, including BECOMING JOSEPHINE and the forthcoming RODIN’S LOVER (Jan 2015). In addition, she is a freelance editor and contributor to award-winning sites WriterUnboxed.com and RomanceUniversity.org. When not writing, she kicks around a local college teaching craft and industry courses, flexes her foodie skills, or looks for excuses to head to the other side of the world.

Learn more about Heather and her books at her website and blog. She can also be found on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Different Voices Create a Beautiful Blog

By Patricia Stoltey

I feel like someone pulled me through a knothole backwards.

I took a little time off last week and went to visit family in Illinois. And I went unplugged for five days. The five days was great. Now I’m suffering the consequences.

My To Do list is so long I’m as jumpy as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs. I wake up in the middle of the night, thinking of something I forgot to add to the list.

Because I was out of town, the young lady who helps me keep the house from looking like a total disaster couldn’t come, so when my critique group met at my house last night, they had to wade through the clutter and pretend not to notice the dust.

Thank goodness they had no reason to look in my refrigerator or freezer. The ice cream has whiskers and there are unidentified things in containers and plastic bags that might have developed teeth and claws.

I’ve already read all that stuff from the time management gurus. They might as well try to teach me how to milk ducks.

Okay, so those colorful little phrases about knotholes, cats, whiskers, and ducks are not mine. They were swiped from my paternal grandmother who had a fun way of describing her world. That’s her voice, not mine.

That’s where I’m at today. Stealing words from my grandmother because we should have had a guest blogger in this slot.

Instead, you have me.

And that leads me to the point of this whole post.

The Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers blog has a team of regular contributors, each with his or her own point of view and unique voice. We also leave dates open each month so we can host RMFW members who want to make a guest appearance to talk about a pet topic, promote a new book, or share writing life experiences. It’s another way we can introduce members to each other (and to the world) between conferences and workshops. That variety of voices blends in a beautiful chorus that describes our organization and our writing lives better than any one writer could.

Starting in January 2015, we’ll have quite a few of those guest spots to fill (two in January and more in February and beyond). If you’d like to be a guest, contact me at patriciastoltey (at) yahoo.com or Julie Kazimer at jkazimer (at) msn.com.

Plan ahead, because we try to fill the calendar a month or two in advance.

You don’t want us feeling like that long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs, do you?

Sexy Nurse? Sexy Librarian? Sexy Serial Killer? Yeah, Maybe Not that Last One. Who Will You Be?

By J.A. (Julie) Kazimer

I love Halloween. Who doesn’t? Free tooth decay and crazy people in and out of costumes. What more could you want?

Though I stopped (thanks to a restraining order) dressing up myself, my pups must suffer playing dress up. Yes, it’s mean. Yes, they hate it. And YES I love every minute of torturing them. That’s what they get for getting to sleep on the bed 365 days a year.

Since I became a published author (2010), I started using my main characters of whatever book I am writing as the pups’ costumes. My pups are Bodie (a Weimaraner who’s 12) and Killer (a small, short-legged mutt of something or other who just turned 3). This year’s theme is Little Boy Blue (which Bodie will be playing since he’s senior dog and gets the good roles) and The Tooth Fairy (poor Killer hates his wings and tutu. Thinks it’s emasculating. Go figure) I honor of The Fairyland Murders, releasing in December in case I haven’t mentioned it a time or two.

I’ll post photos on facebook as that’s part of the torture too.

In the meantime, check out some other literary Halloween animal fun!

See the photos by friending me on facebook!

The Perils of First Person

by Katriena Knights

Many beginning authors start their writing adventures with first person. To many beginners, it feels more natural, more immediate, and even easier. But writing in first person carries a number of stumbling blocks and dangers that aren’t as obvious in third person.

So what’s the big deal? Write in first person, and your reader will feel like they’re right in the middle of the action, right? In fact, this leads to the first peril of first person writing—keeping your protagonist in the middle of the action. Which isn’t always as easy as it might seem.

If you decide to write your story in first person, you can’t recount any events that happen while your protagonist is absent. This can cause all kinds of problems, especially with a more complex story. You should take this into account when you’re plotting your story, and be sure your main character participates fully in any major plot twists. In Twilight, Stephenie Meyer commits a major faux pas in this regard by having Bella fall unconscious during a critical moment of the story’s climax. It’s a really good way to lose your reader. Apparently this didn’t bother her jillions of readers, but it bugged the heck out of me.

Another question to ask is particularly important if you plan to write a series. Can you sustain a first-person narrative over the course of your series? This approach is common in the YA and Urban Fantasy genre, but keep it in mind as you’re constructing your initial plans and proposals.

In the Outlander series, Diana Gabaldon manages to make it through nearly two massive tomes without deviating from the POV of her main character, Claire Beauchamp-Randall-Fraser. But it’s not long before her story outgrows this POV, and Gabaldon starts dealing with the shortcomings of first person by using third person in various scenes. At first, she frames this as Jamie relating stories to Claire. But then she also needs to tell Bree and Roger’s story, and that’s when the first-person train goes completely off the rails. The bulk of Gabaldon’s epic series is told in alternating first and third person, with the only first-person sections being those told from Claire’s POV. I’m not saying it doesn’t work—it works very well in these books. But it’s a tricky thing to balance, and I wouldn’t necessarily recommend that approach.

Another fairly common approach to first-person narrative is to alternate the POV characters, telling each section from a first-person perspective. This can be an effective way to explore more than one character, but there are some pitfalls here, as well. Don’t try to use too many characters—your reader is likely to get confused about whose POV she’s in. Also, it’s very important to vary the narrative voice. I’ve read some alternating first-person POV stories where the voices of the characters were virtually identical, even though one was female and one was male. This made it very difficult for me to orient myself, since there were few proper names to let me know whose head I was in.

I’m not one of those readers who’ll flat-out refuse to read a book if it’s in first person—although they do exist—but like any reader I can be pulled out of a story if the technique falls short. So when you’re considering the structure and plot for your first-person story, think about addressing some of these possible problems so you can head them off at the pass.

(By the way, this post is brought to you by my laboring over my recent WIP, the sequel to Necromancing Nim, which is written in—you guessed it—first person.)

Five Reasons Why Stephen King Must DIE!

By Aaron Ritchey

Whenever I meet anyone who doesn’t like Stephen King, I immediately mistrust and I hate them.  I’m a HUGE Stephen King fan, and I just finished reading 11/22/63, which is just one of his many masterpieces.

Yes, I am a Stephen King fan, but I also am full of envy and hate.  He’s too good.  I revel in his genius and then despise him for his craft.  At times, he’s so good I want to kill him dead and then eat his heart and absorb his storytelling spirit.  Wasn’t that like a story in Night Shift?

Anyway, here’s why Stephen King must die because he is just too good:

  • THE DEVIL: Many of my friends think Stephen King doesn’t need an editor, more like a chainsaw, to cut his books in half or more. I whole-heartedly disagree. The brilliance of Stephen King is that he sets up his world with such details that you are immersed in the experience.  He uses the senses, he uses ad slogans, he uses the minutia of the day-to-day to create a world so tangible, so real, that when in introduces the big, bad wolf, we readers are unnerved.  Stephen King has mastered the idea that the devil is in the details, and yeah, he writes horror, so at times, it’s actually a physical devil.  If there is one area I need to improve, it’s on adding details to setting, to characters, to really create the world of my story in the reader’s mind.  In On Writing, King argues that reading a novel is actually telepathy—his thoughts are transferred into our minds and we see what he sees and feel what he feels.  How does he do that?  Through details.
  • HIGH NOON: Stephen King writes page-turners. Why?  Because he knows all about    Sometimes he does it subtly, sometimes blatantly.  It’s why reading his books is so addictive.  He will write something like, “And that was the last time Ed saw his wife alive.”  Right away, we want to know what is going to happen to Ed’s wife!  Yeah, blatant foreshadowing, but it works.  Also, what I love about King is that he will set up the big High Noon gunfight, to give us something to worry about, to look forward to, and every page brings us closer and closer to that inevitable crescendo of violence.  In The Wolves of the Calla, most of the book is in anticipation of the big gun fight, and it kept me turning pages.
  • QUICK KISSES: So we have the big high noon gunfight in the distance. In 11/22/63, it was trying to stop the Kennedy assassination.  However, he gives us pay-offs along the way.  While the High Noon climax is the macro-foreshadowing (as is the mystery of Ed’s wife), he also uses micro-foreshadowing, but he doesn’t keep us dangling in an anticipation for long.  These are like quick kisses of satisfaction.  He introduces story questions, sets it up so we are curious, and then answers them in the same chapter.  Again, this keeps us reading because we want to know!  He doesn’t just give us the answers right away, but keeps us on edge.  Which is another reason why his books are so long.  They have to be, to enjoy the experience.
  • MOTHER’S MILK: So we are plunged into a very real world with lots of details.  We have the High Noon gunfight in the distance.  We have quick kisses of satisfying story answers along the way, but in the mix are layers of conflict that keep us breathless.  Or at least with a niggling bit of anxiety about what might happen.  King milks conflict.  I can’t tell you how many books I’ve read where the conflict is a single layer that is wrapped up quickly.    Please, keep me on edge.  For example, 11/22/63, we have the homeless guy outside of the time portal.  He’s not right. He’s crazy, and we know, he holds the answers, but King keeps him silent because he adds another dimension to the conflict. As does the romance with the high school librarian.  As does the evil bookies who realize our hero knows way too much about the past to be lucky.  Throw in a psychotic gunman trying to kill the president, and the conflicts add up.
  • THE DAREDEVIL: King writes fast, writes his heart, shoots from the hip. His novels aren’t perfect, but perfection is overrated.  The Walking Dead is a popular show not because it’s perfect, but because it gets certain things right, the important things. So too, Stephen King gets the basics just right.  Not perfect, but right.

So yes, King is a master, and, really, I don’t want him dead. He’s good, but he’s spent a lifetime working on his craft and taking chances. I will read his books until the Grim Reaper drags either him or me into that cold grave.

 

 

 

On Finding the Right Writing Partner

By Colleen Oakes

Confession: I’ve never liked writing a book without a writing partner. I’ve written one, and although the book is a source of pride for me, it was a lonely enterprise and not one I’m likely to repeat.  I know it’s possible to write alone – in fact, it’s pop-culture vision of the ideal writer: a man – usually – sits alone in a narrow room that looks out onto a snowy, wintery landscape.  He has a pipe in his mouth, a pen in his hand. The room is cluttered with books and papers, and it all looks so cozy and intellectual, the perfect combination of genius and isolation.   In this business, we tend to cling desperately to the idea that a true writer writes alone, and yet I have found that only in a good writing partner can I reach my full potential as a creative writer.

My first writing partner’s name was Emily.  We decided on New Year’s Eve that we would both write books in the next year and with just a few months over our desired deadline, we did.  Writing with her was incredible. She had the best way of weaving her words and her thoughts deep into my characters. She understood what my characters should and should not do. She was brutally honest when she needed to be, the best beta reader a writer could ever have.  We had the best time writing together.  Likewise, I was the same for her novel, a beautiful musical sigh of a novel called Serenade.

Yes you can

Then Emily moved to North Carolina, and my writer’s heart broke.  I could write without her, but it wasn’t the same.  It wasn’t the same level of coordination,  feedback and understanding. Mostly, it just wasn’t as fun.  I miss her every day, but we stay in close touch as good friends. However, the distance makes it almost impossible to be the same level of writing partners that we once were.

Enter Mason, stage right.  Mason was so different than Emily. Emily and I are both women. We were very close friends before we ever started writing our novels.  Our books were about women, for women. We have a lot of feelings.  Mason, on the other hand, is a dude.  His character is a dude. He is a Sci-Fi writer. He loves tech and plasma guns and biology and astronomy and a million other things that I don’t understand in the least.   And yet…he is also the perfect writing partner.  Our conversations are hilarious and sometimes very harsh; one promise we made to each other early on is that we are always, always honest. Even when it hurts. Always supportive, always honest.  He’s pointed out while I write Wendy Darling that I didn’t give much thought to the dynamics of flight.  (I hadn’t.)  My characters need voice work. He hates my mountain range.  I dislike reading tech-y descriptions and could care less about Magnetic Reactors. His main character arc needs work. We throw these missiles at each other, but instead of exploding, we take them in and use the fire to hone our pens, to make our gifts sharper and better.  We grow together as writers. I’ll take someone harsh but helpful over kind but useless any day.

If I could impart any advice to new writers, it’s this: find a writing partner. You might need to go through a few before finding the right one, but it’s worth the struggle. Don’t be that solitary writer scribbling out mad genius on the corners of his cell. That guy isn’t real most of the time. Writing can be dreadfully lonely when you only have characters in your mind to keep you company. Find the person who raises you above your own art.

This.

Some tips to finding the perfect writing partner:

1. Make sure you have a similar pace of writing. If it takes one writer two years to write a book and the other a mere three months, it might not be a great partnership. (James Patterson and George R.R Martin would probably not work out.)

2. Writing different genres does not matter, but are you the same level as talent? When you speak to them, do you feel on equal footing?

3. Ask these questions: Are they responsible with your work? Are they responsive? Is their advice helpful? Are they able to find the honest flaws in your writing or are they just trying to make themselves feel better by criticizing?

4. Finally: do you like them? As a person, do you like them? Because there will be times when you feel like a failure. When the publishing industry will spit you out and they will be there to pick you up.  You should like that person now, because you will need them later.

Once you find the right writing partner, make sure you do your part to keep the relationship humming.  It takes work, just like any relationship, and you can’t let it fall to waste.

The perfect writing partner is a gift, and it’s a gift you, as a writer, should choose give yourself.

Free Your Writing Soul, and Write Better as a Result

By Tina Ann Forkner

My debut novel released in 2008 from a legacy publisher. Sounds like a dream come true, doesn’t it? And it was, for a while. When my next novel came out in 2009, it looked to some people like I was on the publishing journey every aspiring writer wanted. When 2010 came and went and I didn’t have a contract, I didn’t worry too much. I was tired, and besides, plenty of writers have gone a few years between books and it didn’t hurt their careers. Maybe 2011 would be my year, but that year came and went too.

Forkner_Waking Up Joy2012 and 2013 were years of several near misses, a few promising projects that fell through before a contract could ever be signed, and several all-out rejections. And now here we are in 2014 and Waking Up Joy has finally released. Yes, that’s five years from my last book, people. Five. So why did it take so long?

The answer is complex, but soon after my second novel was published, the book world was doing somersaults in the midst of huge economic and technological change. Somewhere in the middle of all the publishing craziness when my early novels were releasing, I lost sight of what mattered most. With publishers’ budgets shrinking, I needed to work harder to let people know about my books and it was no longer about writing.

All the pressure made me feel as if blog posts, tweets, and status updates were the keys to selling my books, and I didn’t like it. I felt as if I were toting a box of my books around on my back hollering to anyone who might be listening, “Here, buy my book! PLEASE!” I felt pathetic. I felt fake. I felt like a fraud, but I did it because a lot of people had invested time in my book. I wanted to be a good author, but when multi-published authors like myself were no longer guaranteed publishing contracts, I felt discarded and hurt by the industry. Not knowing when publication would come again, I asked myself why I was still busting my backside for no pay while I had bills to pay and my family stood outside my office door asking if I could come out and play.

I wanted to play again, so I decided to stop taking the pursuit of publication so personally, and I slowed down. Fortunately, I had a great agent who believed in the book I was writing and I knew he would continue to shop my proposals. In the meantime, I had three beautiful kids I’d shown off at both of my book launch parties who were growing up faster than the book industry was changing, and I decided to focus on what meant the most to me. I wrote, of course, but I did so at my own pace. I kept a half-hearted online presence, just in case I ever got published again, but overall, I laid low. Let me tell you, scaling back for a while was the best decision I ever made.

Slowing down might sound like a career killer to some writers, and sometimes I wondered if it would be, but I was willing to risk it for my own sanity, and for my family. It’s not as if I didn’t write during the breaks I took (I took more than one). I did, but on the days I opened my manuscript to revise and fine tune my story, I wrote slower and better. Sometimes, I didn’t write novels at all, and those were the times I gave to my family, to myself, and to my soul. I also went back to work, which I highly recommend for all writers. It’s good to get away from your desk to be around human beings, and I don’t have to tell any of you, there’s nothing like getting paid.

So, if you’re reading this and you know for a fact you don’t need a break, then that’s great. We are all on a different mile of this writing journey. But if you think you’re burning out and publication has become more important than the beautiful act of writing, or worse, more important than your personal well-being, then you might consider scaling back. Personally, it has worked for me.

It’s funny how when I slowed down and focused on the act of writing instead of on the frenzy of publication, the writing flow came back. Now that I’m releasing a new book, I’m back in the race, so to speak, but this time it’s not really a race, and I’m ready.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Tina Ann ForknerTina Ann Forkner is a Women’s Fiction writer and the author of the new novel Waking Up Joy from Tule Publishing Group. She is also the author of Rose House and Ruby Among Us from Random House. Tina’s new book is set in Oklahoma where she was raised, but she makes her home in Cheyenne, Wyoming where she is a substitute teacher and lives with her husband, three teenagers, and two spoiled dogs.

Learn more about Tina and her novels at her website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, and Goodreads.

Memories and Milestones

By Pamela Nowak

Memories are precious things. I’ve known that for most of my life but was struck anew at just how priceless they are when helping pack up my mom’s household items as she moved to a much smaller residence last month. We came across box after box of old photos, school projects, handmade cards, and baby items. As we went through them, the past came flooding back, bringing smiles and tears.

Our writing20141014_151926 life, too, is filled with memories and milestones.

Several years ago, just after I was offered my first book contract, a fellow writer offered this advice: make a scrapbook—you will want to remember the emotions you felt during this journey.

It made sense because they were really great emotions!

I began packing things away in a plastic tote, deciding to 20141014_152021chronicle the whole journey. I pulled out my files of rejection letters, my contest entries with score sheets and comments, even old critique group comments. I’d saved them all, pat-rack that I am. Here was my chance to put them to use. I added in print-outs from emails…the offer, the negotiation20141014_152218s, the contract. I added congratulatory notes from friends, announcements I’d made on list-serve groups, cards and letters. I included pages from internet sites: my website, blogs I was invited to participate in, review sites. Added in were photos, reviews, news clippings, announcements of signing events, and other remembrances.20141014_152628

Purchasing scrapbooks, I sought background pages to reflect writing, romance, and dreams. I did the same with stickers and 3-D accents. In the end, I created several scrapbook volumes chronicling my writing journey.

Every now and then, I pull them 20141014_152743out and relive the moments of struggle and reward. Like my mom’s boxes, they are full of smiles and tears—exquisite, treasured pieces of the past. They reflect accomplishment and provide a sense of renewed commitment as I step toward the next phases in my journey.

Consider the idea of creating your own scrapbooks. Even if you don’t have a creative bent in that direction, keep the memories together in one spot. It doesn’t need to be anything fancy—just a collection of milestones to reflect upon and set your course for what’s to come.

The Legal Side of Anthologies (Part 1)

By Susan Spann

Anthologies offer a great opportunity for authors to publish creative works and find new readers. Some anthologies feature works by authors from a specific group (for example, RMFW’s own CROSSING COLFAX, which contains short stories from members of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers organization), while others have open submissions on a specified topic, like horror or science fiction. Still others feature a publisher’s in-house authors, or a group of authors who come together to write about a topic of mutual interest (such as A DAY OF FIRE, a novel in six parts, about Pompeii and the eruption of Vesuvius).

In short: the options are almost limitless.

Anthologies lend themselves equally well to traditional publication and self-publishing, and can help new or lesser-known authors achieve much broader exposure, due to shared marketing efforts and the ability to “cross pollinate” from other authors’ existing readership.

But I’m a lawyer, so you know there must be a fly in this ointment somewhere.

Handled properly, anthologies have many benefits and relatively few drawbacks (aside from those common to publishing as a whole). However, it’s important to ensure–before you submit– that the anthology you’re considering provides both you and your work with proper protection and consideration of your legal rights.

In the months to come, we’ll break down the legal issues surrounding anthologies here on the RMFW blog. Today, we’ll take an overview look at the biggest legal traps and pitfalls present in anthology publication.

1. Contract, Contract, Contract.

Never publish your work in any anthology that doesn’t have a professional, written publishing contract. Never. No exceptions. No ifs, ands, or buts. NO.

The contract needs to contain the same type of language, and address the same issues, as any traditional publishing contract (plus some special terms applicable only to anthologies) – even in the case of self-published anthologies. Why? Because you’re allowing someone else (the anthology publisher) the right to publish your work. The terms upon which that publication happens must be spelled out clearly in a written contract, so both you and the publisher (whoever that is!) have a written reference and foundation for publication.

2. Don’t Sign Away Your Copyright.

Anthology publishers need only a limited license to publish the work as part of the anthology. Anthology publishers do NOT need copyright ownership of the individual works. While authors have the right to transfer copyright to the anthology publisher, that eliminates the author’s right to use and publish the work in other contexts later on. My law school contracts professor taught us that “you can make as good a deal…or as bad a deal…as you are able,” but why make a bad deal about your writing?

Anthologies are plentiful, and most of them do not take the author’s copyright. The decision is yours to make, but I strongly recommend you refuse to submit to any anthology that tries to take the copyright in your work.

Note: the anthology contract probably will contain language stating that the publisher owns the copyright on the anthology as a collective work. This is different from owning the copyright on your story. Copyright on the collective work means the right to publish the anthology itself, as a collection consisting of all of the stories within it — and that copyright exists to ensure that no one else can copy and sell the anthology as a whole without permission. If you can’t tell what your contract says in this regard, be sure to get an opinion from an experienced copyright attorney before you sign.

3. Show Me the Money (and Where it’s Going).

Sometimes the participating authors get a share of royalties on anthology sales. Other times the proceeds go to the organization sponsoring the publication, to charity, or to someone else entirely. Make sure you know, and evaluate, where the money is going before you agree to participate.

4. Consider the Source.

All publications are not created equal. Some anthologies carry more cachet (and sell more copies) than others. Evaluate the publisher, group affiliations, and other aspects of the anthology before you submit, and  publish only with groups that you want your name affiliated with.

5. Stand and Deliver – on Time.

Anthologies have deadlines, like any other publication. Don’t submit your story late, or unfinished, or in non-publishable condition … and if you do, prepare to accept the consequences.

6. Ask About Purchase and Marketing Requirements.

Some anthologies require participating authors to purchase a specified number of copies of the finished work and/or to participate in specific marketing efforts. (Note: no matter what the requirements are, be prepared to help market the anthology when it releases. It’s rude to expect someone else to do all the work.) Know what your obligations are beforehand, so you don’t have rude surprises down the line. 

In the months to come, my #PubLaw posts here at the RMFW blog will look in-depth at these and other anthology-related issues, including those sneaky contract provisions specific to anthologies. Have questions I haven’t answered? Feel free to ask in the comments, and I’ll work them into future posts!  

Susan Spann is a California transactional attorney whose practice focuses on publishing law and business. She also writes the Shinobi Mysteries, featuring ninja detective Hiro Hattori and his Portuguese Jesuit sidekick, Father Mateo. Her debut novel, CLAWS OF THE CAT (Minotaur Books, 2013), was named a Library Journal Mystery Debut of the Month. The second Shinobi Mystery, BLADE OF THE SAMURAI, released on July 15, 2014. When not writing or practicing law, Susan raises seahorses and rare corals in her marine aquarium.You can find her online at her website (http://www.SusanSpann.com), on Facebook and on Twitter (@SusanSpann).

Kickstart This: Six Lessons Learned

By Kerry Schafer

Recently I ventured into completely uncharted territory for me – a Kickstarter campaign for the purpose of producing a quality Indie book. When I say recently I mean so recently that the sweat from my shaking fingers hasn’t yet dried on the launch button. I can’t set myself up as a success story if we judge success by how well the Kickstarter does in the long run. But I have managed to get as far as Launch, so I thought I’d share some lessons learned from that part of the process.

Whether you’re an Indie writer or a Hybrid writer who might someday want to try a Kickstarter, or just somebody who is interested, here are six things I’ve learned about Kickstarters in the last few weeks.

1) What IS a Kickstarter Anyway? I’ve sort of passively wondered about this for awhile. I knew they existed and involved money and crowd sourcing, but that was the extent of my knowledge. Basically, Kickstarter.com provides a place for creative types to present a business proposal for a creative project. Backers commit to supporting the project at varying financial levels but no money exchanges hands unless and until the project is fully funded. In exchange for their support, backers are rewarded in the form of some item directly connected to the project. For writers these rewards often take the form of books, contact with the writer over Skype or phone or coffee, input into the story, a chance to name a character, and so on.

2) Successful Projects Start with a Video, or at least so says the Kickstarter website. It’s possible they have sadistic people working there and just like to see introverted creative types squirm like a worm on a hook. Or maybe their claim that potential backers want to see and hear from the project creator is valid. Whatever the truth of the matter, if you find yourself in this situation rely on the kindness of friends. You’ll be amazed at what they will do for you in terms of support, editing, advice, and even possibly appearing in your video.

3) You’ll Need to Do Math. You may think I’m kidding, but this is true. People who are considering backing a project want to see a reasonably detailed budget. How much have you allocated for various expenses? Does it all add up to what you’ve set for your goal? Have you considered the costs of the rewards you’ve promised? Oh, and don’t forget the 5% Kickstarter claims if the project funds. Backers want to be sure you’ll be able to deliver on the promised goods.

4) It’s Scary and Exciting. Putting yourself and your beloved project out there – whether it’s a book, or a CD, or something you’re building – pulls out all the emotional stops. There’s the excitement of a whole new adventure, combined with the fear that nobody – not even your best friend and your mother – will back your project. Not funding could be ego crushing, especially when you consider that the Potato Salad Guy made, like, millions. On the other hand, having people back your project is like an unexpected visit from your fairy godmother.

5) It’s Business. At the end of the day, what you’re really doing is asking people, some of them total strangers, to support a business proposition. So it’s not really about you and whether people like you or not. That said, it is important to present as trustworthy and reputable. You don’t want to look so dodgy they think you’re going to take the funds and run off to become the next evil overlord of Gotham. The advice I was given is to be as transparent as possible and present your plan and your goals clearly.

6) You’ll Need Help. This is one of those things you can’t do on your own. You’ll need people to talk you down from the trees and people to give you a motivational kick in the pants. You’ll need eyes on your proposal to see what you’ve missed. You’ll need voices to help get the word out after you hit the launch button. The good news it that writer types are the most generous people on the face of the planet. Ask your people. They will be there for you.