Category Archives: RMFW Conference

What’s Going On At Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers?

The Colorado Gold Conference

JefferyDeaver200x230Have you signed up yet? With keynote speakers like Jeffery Deaver and Desiree Holt, how can you go wrong? Add in agents and editors--Danielle Burby, Trish Daly, Denise Dietz, Tiffany Schofield, Chelsey Emmelhainz, Sarah Joy Freese, Erin George, Carrie Howland, Emily S. Keyes, Melissa Jeglinkski, Ben LeRoy, and Latoya C. Smith--and you know Westminster, Colorado is the right place to be September 11-13, 2015.

If you haven't registered yet, you better do it now. Last year the conference registration was filled in record time. You don't want to miss out. For all the information on master classes, conference sessions, meals, hotel, and how to register, click here to go to the website's conference pages.

The Podcasts

Mark Stevens is currently hosting a series of interviews and programs with the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Podcasts. Podcast #5 featured Heather Webb with "Finding Your Voice." #4 -- Holt Finalist Tina Ann Forkner Talks Romance & James Norris Previews RMFW Workshop on Boosting Character Conflict.

The complete list of podcasts and links are available in the website Podcast section right here.

The Blog

Are you following the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers blog Monday through Friday? With a team of regular contributors and several guest bloggers each month, all from the RMFW membership list, the blog is a great way to meet other members and enjoy the information they're willing to share with the tribe and all aspiring writers interested in what we do here at RMFW.

Did you follow Jeanne C. Stein's lessons in genre writing? Get a chuckle (or a groan) from reading the humor of Julie Kazimer or Aaron Ritchey? Explore ways to get reviews with Janet Lane? All these and more are available on the blog pages of the RMFW website.

By the way, you can sign up to receive email notices of each new blog post so you don't miss anything. Just scroll down the blog page until you find the Email Address (in red) box in the right sidebar.

The Social Media Connection

Go to the Home Page or the Blog Page and you'll find the little Social Media icons in the right sidebar with links to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+ and more.

Are you a member?

If you visit the website, listen to the Podcasts, attend the conference, enjoy our monthly free classes, or read the blog, but haven't become a member of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers yet, why not today?  Here's the link for membership information.

P’s in Publishing … by Margaret Mizushima

Margaret MizushimaWhenever there is a first time published author panel at conferences, I’m often in the audience. I never tire of listening to the different ways authors connect with their publishers. Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers played an important role in my story, and while this blog might be aimed more toward those seeking publication, other members could still be interested. I’ll tell you how the P’s in publishing worked for me.

Persistence. Don’t give up. Like many of my writing friends, I’ve been at this for a long time. I’ve attended writing conferences including those presented by RMFW, bought a bookshelf full of how-to books, attended creative writing classes and writing institutes, and studied my favorite authors to see how they crafted their novels. I’ve written several novels that are buried in my storage cabinet and will never again see the light of day. I’ve wanted to give up, but I didn’t; and persistence finally paid off, resulting in a publishing contract. Continue to pitch your work to agents and editors if you want to go the traditional route. Take classes in indie publishing if you’re interested in going that direction.

Positioning. I found both my agent and my publisher at writing conferences. Position yourself so that you can meet yours. Pitch your work at conference pitch sessions, sit at a meal table with the person you want to meet, introduce yourself in hallways and elevators. Be polite; ask permission to pitch outside of scheduled pitch sessions. I met Matt Martz of Crooked Lane Books at the RMFW Conference 2014, sat at his table on Friday night, and asked if I could pitch to him after dinner. He agreed and told me to send it, which I did as soon as I could. I know how scary it feels when you sit at the computer with your finger hovering over that send button. Be brave. When you get the nod, be sure to follow through.

Mizushima_Killing TrailBe Pliable. Matt Martz passed my manuscript to Nike Power, editorial and publishing assistant at CLB. She loved the characters, setting, and writing, but not the plot. She asked if I was willing to talk about it, and of course I said yes. We began an exchange of emails leading to suggested revisions that would require a large amount of time. My novel fit between genres, and she thought it would find readers more easily if I made it a solid mystery. I hesitated. There were no guarantees, and approximately two months of work lay ahead. Besides, I liked my story. But…although the work had generated some interest, I had not yet received an offer. I decided I had nothing to lose except time, and maybe I’d end up with something I liked even better.

Be prompt. If I wanted to make their 2016 publication schedule, I needed to meet the deadline that Nike suggested for me. This is important at this stage for other reasons, too. Editors want to make sure you can get your work back to them when they need it. They may offer some flexibility, but it’s still an opportunity for them to see if you can be on time, even before you’re offered the contract. In my case, the resubmission worked. Nike told me she liked the new version, and she would talk to my agent. I’m delighted to say that she remains my editor, and we’ll be working together on two books, the first two in The Timber Creek K-9 series.

Promote. Promotion starts before you publish. In reality, it should start when you set a goal to write a book. Marketing should include taking a look at what readers want. I don’t mean try to follow a trend, things move too slowly in this industry for that. Write the story you want, but keep your readers in mind. Research by reading popular books, study how bestselling authors develop their characters and structure their stories, and strengthen your writing skills through education and critique. Network at conferences, listen to authors who already know the ropes and are willing to offer guidance, set up those social media sites and accounts. Attend workshops at conferences to learn about the different ways you can promote, both online and off.

And that brings me back to Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. This organization can help you achieve your writing goals. At RMFW 2014, conference chair Susan Brooks stated that this is our tribe. Be a part of it, and benefit from all of the many opportunities RMFW has to offer. I’m very grateful for everything it has given me.

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Margaret Mizushima is the author of Killing Trail: A Timber Creek K-9 Mystery to be released December 8, 2015 by Crooked Lane Books, available now for preorder on Amazon. Her fiction has won contest awards, and her short story “Hayhook” was selected for the 2014 Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers anthology Crossing Colfax. She likes reading, hiking, and yoga, and she lives in Colorado with her husband and a multitude of animals.

Learn more about Margaret at her website. She can also be found on Facebook at Margaret Mizushima Author and on Twitter @margmizu.

An Interview with Agent Emily S. Keyes

Emily S. KeyesBy Jeffe Kennedy

I had the opportunity to chat a bit with Emily S. Keyes, an agent with my agency, Fuse Literary. Read on to learn a bit more about her before you meet her at the Colorado Gold Conference!

Jeffe: Hi from Mountain Time! Are you in NYC?

Emily Keyes: Yes!

Jeffe: Are you a local girl or did you move to the city to be an agent?

Emily Keyes: Sort of both? I am from Connecticut, which is pretty close to NYC. I moved to New York to start the NYU Publishing program. I knew I wanted to work with books. When I was a kid I guess I thought the only book job was author. Or maybe I didn't even think of that as a job. Because I knew Carolyn Keene wasn't a real person and Francine Pascal didn't write the books with her name on them. I vividly remember seeing Ann M. Martin on TV once and I was like, "Oh so some of them are real people!"

Jeffe: That's so fun! I vividly recall that moment of discovering books came from actual people

Emily Keyes: I know - it's weird, right? How did you discover it if you don't mind me asking?

Jeffe: I was a huge fan of Marguerite Henry's horse books. My aunt suggested that I write her a letter, which was an extraordinary thought to me. I did - and she wrote me back!

Emily Keyes: THAT'S SO COOL! I loved horse books. I worked on some of her old contracts a bit at Simon & Schuster.

Emily Keyes: Anyway, I learned more about publishing in college. My university had a publishing class. I was like, "This is what I want to do." But I didn't know how to break into publishing at all. No one in my family had worked in publishing and I didn't know anyone who did. I would send resumes to the internship programs and never hear back. So I decided to take the plunge and go to NYC without a job, but I did the NYU program because they said I could have on campus housing for a semester. I think my mom thought I was going to get stabbed in the face. New York is scary at first.

Jeffe: So did you go to work for Simon & Schuster after NYU?

Emily Keyes: After I moved to NYC I got an internship at the World Almanac. Which was good for my trivia skills. And then about a year after that I started at Simon & Schuster in the contracts department.

Jeffe: And then you moved from publishing to agenting?

Emily Keyes: I left S&S in 2011. I wasn't sure exactly what I was going to do. I wanted to do more creative/editorial work but I also had this contracts background that I wanted to use. I applied to some agencies. I got hired as a foreign rights and contracts manager at another agency. Then I moved to Fuse!

Jeffe: Why did you pick Fuse? (Besides the fact that it's the best!)

Emily Keyes: It is the best! I started to build my own list at my previous agency and I really wanted to focus on being an agent fulltime. Fuse allowed me to come on as an agent and really go for it! Everyone was very supportive and enthusiastic. The main office is in California, and I was their first hire in NYC. Then Connor Goldsmith (Jeffe’s agent!) and Michelle Richter came aboard so now we're pretty evenly split East vs. West.

We're a virtual agency, which I like. If I could live without paper I would. Well, not paper books, but just loose sheets of paper.

Jeffe: LOL! I'm very much a virtual girl. I totally take eBooks over paper every time, but then my day job is with an environmental consulting firm.

Emily Keyes: I like pop-up books. When they make e-pop-up books I will be set for life.

Jeffe: Ha! I would love that! So what about Fuse do you think makes it a great agency for authors?

Emily Keyes: Fuse is a great agency because everyone is very supportive and collaborative. I think we're very forward-looking compared to some other agencies. We're trying to adapt to the future of publishing. And everyone brings their own knowledge base to the team. It's kind of a Captain Planet-let-our-powers-combine situation.

Jeffe: You have weekly conference calls with all the agents?

Emily Keyes: Yes we have weekly staff meetings, so we know what's going on with everyone and can brainstorm and such. Sometimes we talk for hours and hours.

Jeffe: One thing I really like about Fuse is how you all - not just Connor - make a point of engaging with me and supporting what I'm doing. I feel like you know about me and my books. I love that you all share posts of mine and so forth. Feels very much like being on a team to me.

So, the inevitable question - what are you looking for right now? What kind of authors would you like to add to your list?

Emily Keyes: I still want to add a lot to my list. I'm pretty selective about clients. I don't take on things I don't love (I know everyone says that but not everyone means it--ha!). I've got mostly YA authors right now, and a lot of what I sold was YA contemporary. I still love that area and would like a couple more. But I also want to do YA fantasy, science fiction, mystery, thriller--all the subgenres. I also really, really want middle grade books. Because I remember the books I read when I was 12 way better than the books I read a month ago.

I tend toward contemporary and quirky in MG. But adventure and light fantasy/SF would be fine too.

Jeffe: So people shouldn't pitch you anything older than YA?

Emily Keyes: I do some adult as well. I have a couple adult fantasy clients. I also look for women's fiction right now. I say pitch me stuff that's commercial on the adult side. I'm not really a literary fiction reader. I can always refer you to another agent at my agency if it doesn't feel right for me.

Jeffe: What is Fuse's policy on people pitching more than one agent at the agency? For some agencies, that' s big no-no.

Emily Keyes: Only one at a time. So if you have something with Connor, don't send to me too. but if he passes you could still send to me. Sometimes when more than one of us is at a conference it gets confusing because people don't really look, they just try to talk to all the agents.

Jeffe: Do you believe in the concept of the "dream agent"?

Emily Keyes: I don't know. Things I dream about tend to not go as planned. I think it's about finding someone who you can work with. Obviously, also one who is not a scam artist. I like to say the agent-author relationship is kind of like a coworker relationship. You're the head of the writing department and I'm the head of the selling to publishers department. If we don't see eye-to-eye it's not going to work. Or if you treat me like a servant. So you should talk to an agent to see if you click before deciding that they are "the dream agent."

Jeffe: Good to know! How about a book you love and wish you'd repped?

Emily Keyes: In adult or children's or both?

Jeffe: How about both?

Emily Keyes: Okay. Some recent ones (I won't say I wished I repped books from when I was a kid because I doubt I would've been an effective agent in elementary school) I really loved are NOGGIN by John Corey Whaley. I liked the voice and the realistic feel of the science fiction premise. I also really like accessible fantasy books like Naomi Novik's TEMERAIRE series. And nerdy/fun humor in nonfiction. I wish I'd thought of GEEK GIRL'S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY.

Jeffe: Your Twitter handle - which I love - is @esc_key - I figure it comes from your initials and last name, but how did that come about?

Emily Keyes: Yes it's my initials. My name is Emily Suzanne. But my sister, Elizabeth, has the same initials as me so I started including my confirmation name which is Catherine. And it was ESCK - and I was like "Hey, wait a minute."

Jeffe: It's such a great metaphor!

How about conference protocol? At Colorado Gold, will you want people to chat you up? Pitch anytime or save it for the official sessions?

Emily Keyes: It's fine to come up to me at pitch sessions if you're scheduled, obviously. Also after any panels or something. Even at networking events if you come up and say, "Hey, do you have a minute?" I probably will. Just don't pitch me in the bathroom or, like, when I'm trying to eat lunch.

Jeffe: This question comes up a lot - what if an author has self-published one or more books and would like to pitch a project to you? What guidelines would you suggest there?

Emily Keyes: For self-published projects, it has to have sold a lot for me to want to take that project on. But if you have self-published and have a new project feel free to come and talk to me. I am going to ask you how it did though.

Jeffe: How much do you like to get your fingers into planning your writers' projects? Do you brainstorm with them? Suggest directions? Edit?

Emily Keyes: I've pretty much always done edits with new clients I sign up. For planning the next project, I like to know what's on an author's mind. I can tell you what might be more marketable at the moment or what genre is a bit over-saturated and all that. So yes I do get my fingers in.

Jeffe: Part of the fun?

Emily Keyes: yes!

Jeffe: Anything else to add?

Emily Keyes: I don't think so? That I'm looking forward to the conference. I've never been to Colorado!

Jeffe: We’re looking forward to your visit!

 

Once, Twice, Three Times a Manuscript….(Anyone Under 40 Won’t Have a Clue What Song The Title References But I’m Using it Anyway Because it’s My Title and I Can…Sing it!)

By J.A. (Julie) Kazimer

The weekend before last I was lucky enough to hang out at the Pikes Peak Writer Conference. I also did some teaching but it was more about seeing old friends and making plenty of new fabulous ones. Besides having a great time abusing whiskey, wine and food I spent some time talking with other writers about their process.

It was at this point I had an epiphany.

Or maybe you could refer to it as a drunken revelation.

Either way, this is my point-- tables have dancing naked weight limits.

No, scratch that. I had two epiphanies and a bruise on my coccus the size and shape of Texas.

Anyway....we all have such different methods and madness for our works. And each, while valid, might not be the best choice for us, like dancing on a table when you're old enough to know far better.

Here's what I mean. I'm a pantster. A REALLY BIG ONE. I sit down to write and start at page one, word one. But I can learn to be better at plotting and that could make for more words, and more books. I can learn how to be a better marketer. I can learn to write deeper characters and better description. An old dog can be taught new tricks, as long as the teacher talks real slow and plenty of cookies are involved.

Maybe I can learn these things from a class or a workshop taught from one of the amazing instructors already selected for the RMFW Conference in September. Or I can learn from the fantastic community we are a part of.

One of the interesting things I learned a few weekends ago was from a longtime RMFW member -- Mike Befeler. Mike never knows who is murderer is going to be. Right up until the end. It's a good lesson if you've ever read his work, it feels organic for the protagonist when he figures out who done it. Now I am not saying I could pull it off, but it does give me insight into his process.

I'm interested in your own process. How many revisions does it take for the finished (or as close as you can get) product? Do you know what is going to happen when you start? Do you have any advice that has helped you greatly along your path? Let's open up and share all we can together.

Or else I will get on that table!

 

The Fairyland Murders_ebook (1)J.A. (Julie) Kazimer writes books. So many books that she now has to use her toes to count them. Learn more at jakazimer.com or friend her on facebook because she's pretty lonely. You can also tweet her at @jakazimer and she'll share some gruesome stories about decaying bodies or puppies. Tweeters choice.

Also, her latest book, THE FAIRYLAND MURDERS is on sale for the low, low, how the heck am I going to afford my Rolex now, price of $1.99. I don't know how long it will be on sale as my publisher never tells me anything....So pick up a copy today. Or don't. I'm not going to beg...Okay, I will beg. Please, please--

What’s Going On at Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers?

The Colorado Gold Conference

JefferyDeaver200x2302015 Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
Colorado Gold Conference

September 11-13, 2015
The Westin, Westminster, Colorado

Keynote speakers: Jeffery Deaver and Desiree Holt

Register now at the RMFW website conference page.

 

Colorado Gold Writing Contest for Unpublished Novelists

The deadline for entering is June 1st, 2015

New This Year
Enter the first 4000 words of your manuscript and a 750 word synopsis in one of six categories. Final judges will pick 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners.

The final judges for Colorado Gold 2015 are:

Action/Thriller: Denise Dietz, Senior Editor, Five Star Publishing
Mainstream: Danielle Burby, Agent, Hannigan Salky Getzler Agency
Mystery/Suspense: Trish Daly, Associate Editor, William Morrow/HarperCollins
Romance: Latoya Smith, Executive Editor, Samhain Publishing
Speculative Fiction: Emily S. Keyes, Agent, Fuse Literary
YA/MG: Melissa Jeglinski, Agent, The Knight Agency

You'll find lots more information and submission requirements on the RMFW website contest page.

 

Upcoming Free Programs

Sean-CurleyThe State of Independent Publishing presented by Sean Curley

Saturday, May 9, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Grand Junction Business Incubator Center
2591 Legacy Way
Grand Junction, CO
Western Slope Free Program for members and non-members

Joining the Revolution: Self-Publishing Made Simple presented by Teresa Funke

Saturday, May 16, 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Anythink Wright Farms Library
5877 E. 120th Ave.
Thornton, CO 80602
Denver Free Program for members and non-members

 

The #RMFWBlog

And while you're checking out these great opportunities, please stop by the blog and scroll through the posts -- a team of regular bloggers and lots of visiting writers provide writing advice and encouragement most weekdays.

We use the hashtag #RMFWBlog on Twitter so you can always find information on the most recent posts there. We also post the links on Facebook and Google+. To make sure you don't miss anything, you can sign up for email notifications of new posts.

Interview with Award Winning Author Desiree Holt

Interview by Susan Brooks originally published April 17, 2015 at Susan's blog.

Desiree Holt is a force of nature. She has written over 170 traditionally published novels since 2006, she is a tireless supporter of other writers, and is insatiably charming. I am privileged to have had opportunity to work with her on past projects, and delighted to have this opportunity to interview her today. She will be our Sunday keynote speaker at the 2015 Colorado Gold Conference.

Hi Desiree!

Thanks so much for hosting me on your blog today. I am really looking forward to Colorado GoldDesireeHolt200x263 and meeting every one attending. And honored to be a presenter.

You have done just about every job imaginable. Tell me about your decision to become a writer.

Writing was always my passion, I think because I have always been a reader and wanted to create my own stories. My friends have always told me I have an overactive imagination. (Grin!). I scribbled in notebooks for years before computers were born, but I wasn’t able to devote the time to it until I retired. Then it was kind of like my brain exploded!

You started writing in 2006. Since then you’ve traditionally published over 170 novels. That is something like seventeen novels a year. HOW DO YOU DO THAT?

I am blessed with the quirky ability to write fast. A story takes shape in my brain (which, by the way, NEVER sleeps), and I can’t seem to get the words down fast enough. I never lack for ideas. Also, I write about eight hours a day.

Tell me about your writing process. Are you a plotter or a panster?

I used to be just a pantser because my stories are character-driven. I create the characters first from ideas that have sparked in my brain. Then I play the What If game. What If my heroine did such and such and my hero popped into the picture? What if my hero did such and such and stumbled over the heroine. That kind of thing. But as my writing has progressed two things have made me alter that. First of all, I often have more than one project going at a time. Secondly, I do a lot of series and the only way I can keep things straight is to have at least a bare outline of a plot to follow. Of course, as I get into the story my characters talk to me and we often take major detours.

So you always come up with the characters first?

Characters first. People fascinate me and I always try to imagine stories for them. And as I progress through the story, they talk to me, often taking me on journeys I never expected.

How did you go about learning the craft when you first started writing?

I had no idea how little I actually knew until I joined a writers group and ultimately a critique group. At least half of them were published authors and I am ever grateful for their guidance and input. I also entered a lot of writing contests through RWA and soaked up all the feedback.

What do you feel is the most important craft element for aspiring writers to master?

Discipline and determination. If you really want to be a writer you cannot let disappointment discourage you. The second is to learn the basics of a story: goal/motivation/conflict. Stick to it until you can make it work.

How many manuscripts had you completed before you sold your first book?

I had five full length manuscripts completed before I made my first sale after 137 rejections. See what I mean about not getting discouraged?

What is the best advice you can give someone wanting to publish?

Write and keep writing, and do everything you can to learn about what makes a saleable manuscript. The market is so different today than it was when I started and with the explosion of self-pubbing there are so many choices for readers. Join writers groups. Talk to people. Learn what makes the industry tick today.

What is the easiest thing and the most difficult thing for you when it comes to writing?

The easiest is creating my characters. The hardest is writing that first chapter. It sets the tone for the story and grabs the reader so I work hard to get it just right.

What is the most surprising thing you learned about the publishing industry over the years?

Wow. Hard to say.

How much marketing do you do for your books? What kind of marketing has given you the best results?

I do a fair amount of marketing along with what my publishers do. I am very big on social media, which has produced great results for me. But of course like anything else you have to have a plan. I am lucky that I have a personal assistant who does a lot of it for me. I do some advertising, along with what my publishers do. And I take full advantage of a very enthusiastic street team.

Which book that you have written is your favorite?

Hmmm. Actually, I have three favorites that I can’t seem to choose between. All completely different. First is a novella, Once Upon a Wedding that has a great twist to it. Second is a novella called Hard Lovin’, based on a 16th century Scottish air and brought forward into modern day Texas. It is being re-released at the end of May with new material and a hot new cover. My Naked Cowboys series because it’s set in a town like the one where I live. And finally my rock star series, because it takes me back to the years I spent in the music business. But I think my new favorite will be my football series, Game On, because I am the world’s most obsessed football fan.

What do you read? Any favorite authors?

I mostly read romance, romantic suspense and thrillers. I have so many favorite authors it’s hard to choose who to name but for romance Marie Force, Carly Phillips, Robyn Carr. For romantic suspense/suspense probably Tess Gerritsen, J. D. Robb (Nora Roberts), Debra Webb. Beyond that John Lescroart, Brad Thor, John Sandford, Jeffrey Deaver, Lisa Jackson.

Desiree, thanks for your time! I know you are a busy lady!

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Referred to by USA Today as the Nora Roberts of erotic romance, Desiree Holt is the world’s oldest living published erotic romance author with over 170 published works. A graduate of the University of Michigan with double majors in English and History, her earlier careers include agent and manager in the music industry, public television, associate vice president of university advancement, public relations, and economic development.

She is three times a finalist for an EPIC E-Book Award (and a winner in 2014), a nominee for a Romantic Times Reviewers Choice Award, winner of the first 5 Heart Sweetheart of the Year Award at The Romance Studio as well as twice a CAPA Award winner for best BDSM book of the year, and winner of the Holt Medallion for Excellence in Romance Literature.

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Susan BrooksSusan Brooks has been reading voraciously since she was a toddler and got her hands on a copy of Go, Dog! Go! Soon after, she won a copy of A Wrinkle in Time through her public library’s summer reading program for reading more books in one summer than all the other students combined. She was six. She decided right then that when she grew up she wanted to read books for a living. She currently is the conference chair for Colorado Gold. She holds a masters degree in publishing from George Washington University and is also a publisher of well-written fiction at Literary Wanderlust, a new print and digital traditional press located in Denver, Colorado.

Besides being ADD, Susan is a freelance editor, and edits for several small publishing houses.

She tweets once in a while and you can follow her as @oosuzieq on Twitter.

Those D—- Workshop Proposals!

By Pamela Nowak

The call for workshop proposals for the 2015 Colorado Gold Conference came out earlier this month, spurring my usual under-the-breath comments about preparing them.

Workshop proposal forms force us to think and organize without knowing whether the effort will net results. It’s the reason we hate to fill them out, especially when they ask for detail. After all, who wants to spend time planning out an entire workshop when it might not even be selected? That seems like a whole lot of work for nothing.

Yet, is it for nothing?

Though I hate filling out proposal forms, I recognize their role. Having served as a conference chair and a member of the workshop committee, I am well-acquainted with how hard it is to make selections. A topic may sound interesting or a short summary might make promises of being geared toward advanced writers. In fact, I recall selecting some of those, back when proposals were less detailed. Months later, the presentation failed to live up to the promises. Attendees, drawn by the same short description, left feeling cheated. That dissatisfaction was reflected on feedback to the conference organizers. And, as more and more people submitted proposals, it became very difficult to decide among those on the same topic; there simply wasn’t enough detail to adequately compare them.

Over the years, especially with the growth in submitted proposals, the form has asked would-be presenters for more information, details, and organization. I’ve filled them out and it takes a lot of time and thought.

I am forced to think beyond my general topic to figure out what, exactly, I will teach. I must determine how I will fill the time and what will make my workshop unique and different. Not only must I write a short description, I must also provide a detailed one. And an outline! Gee whiz! Doesn’t anybody realize how much time that takes??

The thing I’ve discovered, though, is how much easier it is to actually prepare the workshop if it is selected. I have a firm outline to guide me and I don’t scramble at the last minute to figure out what I’m going to do. As a result, I have a much more cohesive lesson plan. I flesh it out more, in the months prior to conference and I arrive prepared and ready to fulfill the promises I made in my short description.

And if the proposal is not selected, it goes in a file for another year or another conference, saving me future work. In fact, some presenters have a whole collection of proposals which they can use for multiple conferences. Once prepared, they need only tweak or update them as necessary.

First-hand knowledge tells me how much easier it makes the selection process for the committee. With nearly five times the proposals as available slots (perhaps even more), it allows conference planners to have enough information to determine if presenters will offer organized workshops or whether they will ramble without focus. It reveals details which convey unique takes on familiar topics. The committee knows if a workshop will be hands-on or lecture-driven. Members can see if there is enough information to fill the time or if it appears the speaker will stall.

Still, there is that niggling voice that tells me it might all be a waste of time since there is no guarantee a proposal will be selected. That’s true…but there is usually a benefit to being selected, beyond sharing information with others and enhancing one’s exposure (for example, RMFW provides a conference discount). To increase the odds of selection, there are things we can do.

  1. Choose a topic that is unique yet not so different that it will appeal only to a small group of people. Conference planning centers around offering a slate that will be interesting to a broad group.
  2. If your workshop is centered around a familiar topic (such as an element of craft), offer a new technique or viewpoint. Make your proposal stand-out as something new. Give the presenters a reason to select yours instead of one of the other seven about the same thing.
  3. Select a relevant topic, something that pertains to writing or publishing today. If you aren’t conveying new information, relate how old information is once again (or still) important to attendees.
  4. Be detailed without being minute. If there are several proposals on the same topic, the details will make your proposal standout and will provide the committee with needed information. At the same time, you don’t need to provide multiple pages of detail. If it takes an hour to read your proposal, reviewers might give up.
  5. Show you are organized. This is what the outline will reflect. It will show how you plan to cover your topic, where you will offer information. It is your opportunity to show that you will not just ramble on but will, instead, offer relevant information in an organized fashion.
  6. If you are proposing a panel, you will want to take special care to show how the session will be structured and that it is not just a group chatting about a topic. The most frequent complaints about panels is that the speakers seemed unprepared, that it was too anecdotal and lacked instructive content, and that speakers seemed to lack a united focus. Including specific topics and questions will help the proposal stand out, as will including a moderator to keep the panel on-task. It is important that every panel member prepare ahead of time rather than contributing “off-the-cuff.”

Okay, time to get back to that proposal…

Guest Post: Daven Anderson “I survived Colorado Gold, and you can, too!”

By Daven Anderson

As we find ourselves enjoying another lovely fall season in colorful Colorado, some of you reading this may be lamenting that the only "Colorado Gold" you won last month were the fallen leaves you raked from your backyard.

You didn't win. You didn't final. Agents aren't camping out in your backyard, contracts in hand.

Fear not, my literary friends, for I am here to tell you that you have not reached the end of your story.

Quite the opposite, in fact. You have reached the beginning.

The true prize from the Colorado Gold is not to win or final, but to learn. To learn to listen objectively, instead of taking constructive criticism personally. To learn that professional writing is a journey of the soul, not just a process. And to learn that the true skill a professional writer must demonstrate, on a daily basis, is perseverance. The best writer in the world is equal to the worst writer in the world, when both are writing nothing.

I still apply the many lessons I learned from my three-year Colorado Gold odyssey. One of which is that the qualities which make your odyssey personal are the oddities no one else can ever gain insight from. The criticisms you received are unique to you, your work, and the judges' mood the evening they read your entry.

Some of you may choose not to re-enter a particular work in future years if it did not win or final in Colorado Gold. But those who can persevere, and learn from the criticisms, can make their work much stronger than it was before.

I entered the same novel in Colorado Gold three years in a row, 2010, 2011 and 2012. The latter two entries incorporated many hard-won revisions, in line with the insightful criticisms I received for my previous entries.

Re-reading my 2010 entry filled me with the urge to put a bag over my head. I am frankly shocked it scored as well as it did. After the 2010 contest, I was filled with the motivation to hone my skills.

In 2011, I entered Colorado Gold flush with confidence, knowing that my entry's prose had improved a seeming ten-fold, compared to the foppish tones of its predecessor. The comments were much more positive overall, yet my score was only four points higher than the year before. In gearhead terms, my "new Mustang GT" barely beat my "clapped-out Pinto" when the final scores were tallied.

Ah, what to do for 2012? Maybe the judges were confused about the juxtapostion between my prologue and Chapter One. And I had heard much talk of prologues being anathema to agents and editors. So, for my 2012 Colorado Gold entry, time to broom the prologue and start with Chapter One.

Of course, my hard work in 2012 was rewarded with my lowest score yet. Yes, even my rank amateur 2010 entry outscored its 2012 successor. Yet the comments and critiques I received for the 2012 entry were notably more positive than for either of my previous entries. Even within the small world of Colorado Gold entries, the scores alone don't tell the whole story. And this was the most important lesson I learned from that year's contest.

Yes, my novel "Vampire Syndrome" failed to win or even final in Colorado Gold, for three years in a row. The only thing "Vampire Syndrome" had won by the end of 2012 was a publishing contract. I am far from being a unique example here, as a fair number of my fellow RMFW members also have released traditionally-published novels that did not win or final in Colorado Gold.

So, in summation, lament not your "loss" in Colorado Gold. Those who learn and persevere have what it takes to win the writing game. You may lose the "battle" of Colorado Gold, but the lessons you learn can lead you to your true victory. The triumph of prose, and the self.

Implementing Your Conference

By Katriena Knights

Author’s Note: Several people are posting their reviews of the recent Colorado Gold conference. I decided to do something different rather than just post, “Colorado Gold was Awesome!!!1!1!!!1.” So instead I’m going to talk about ways to use all the great ideas you get at conferences without overwhelming yourself with change.

Writer’s conferences are a great way to network with other writers, learn more about your craft, and find out what’s working for whom in the world of promotion and sales. A serious writer should probably attend at least one or two a year to keep on top of the latest trends in the industry and to bump elbows with other writers who are undoubtedly experiencing the same struggles and frustrations. You can learn a ton at a good conference--sometimes enough to kick your career or the quality of your writing up to that next level.

Conferences can also be overwhelming, though. You come home filled to bursting with great ideas, but when you start trying to implement them, it’s just too much. Adding that great promotional idea takes away too much time from the manuscript you’re trying to finish, or the kick in the pants you just got about the book you’ve had on the back burner diverts your attention so you can’t focus on the manuscript you’ve got under deadline.

So how do you reconcile these conflicting needs? The best way is to break down what you’ve learned and figure out how to ease into the new routines. This way you can take advantage of what you’ve learned without derailing everything you’ve already built. Here are some ways to accomplish this:

  1. Organize your notes. Look through the notes and materials you brought home from the conference. Sort out the things that got you really fired up—the ones you want to start doing immediately. Set other ideas to the side for future reference.
  2. Figure out what’s relevant. Which of these ideas address an immediate concern? Is there a promotional tool you think will prod your sales up if you use it consistently? Is there a brainstorming idea that looks like it could get you out of the writer’s block you’ve been battling on your WIP? Put those on the top of the pile.
  3. Prioritize. Figure out what makes the most sense to try right away, and what would probably fit into your routine if you leave it for a bit later. For example, if you’ve already committed to a project that has to start immediately after the conference, don’t try to start a new writing or promotional routine that will eat all the time you have for that commitment. You might even put everything aside for a few days to get other work out of the way or to let your ideas marinate.
  4. Implement one thing at a time. Don’t try to change your entire routine in a day. Ease into the new approaches. If the promotional guru you heard at the conference presented a complex posting schedule for your social media, try bumping up your posts gradually on one platform at a time rather than tackling the full schedule from day one. That way you’ll have a new routine in place right away and can build toward the final goal.
  5. Keep building. Once you feel comfortable with the new routine, add to it. Whether your goal is writing more words or posting more promo, keep moving forward incrementally. Go from a post a day to two posts a day. Go from 250 words a day to 500. If you keep moving forward, you’ll end up where you want to be, even if it takes a little longer than you’d like.
  6. Weed things out. Just because a particular method works for one writer doesn’t mean it’ll work for you. If something isn’t comfortable or doesn’t produce the results you’re after, ditch it. It doesn’t mean you’re doing it wrong or that you’ve given up. It just means that particular approach didn’t work for you. Never be afraid to do this. Trying to struggle through a routine that you find tedious is rarely going to get you the results you want.

Working through what you’ve learned at a writers’ conference and getting those tidbits to work for you is a challenge, but in the long run it can be the best way to give your career a kick in the pants. Don’t be afraid to try new things, but don’t be afraid to take it slowly, either.

Becoming an Old Timer

I am now an old-timer.

I realized this last weekend, at the Colorado Gold conference, and the new-found awareness of the role is a bit daunting.

Twenty years ago, I attended my first RMFW conference. I was new to RMFW, having joined earlier in the year after hearing a published member’s presentation on how supportive the organization was. I was a new writer and it seemed just the sort of thing I needed to launch my career, which I was (erroneously) convinced was going to rocket.

Back then, I was still a long way from realizing my potential as a writer and from emerging from my shell of introversion. I knew exactly two people at that conference. I hugged walls, stayed in corners, and observed. I was both eager for someone to talk to me and scared to death that I would have to respond if someone did.

I watched those who were long-term members and active volunteers with their lengths of ribbons and easy conversations. I heard about new contracts and bought stacks of signed books from my idols. I sat in awe as speakers stepped up to the lectern and award winners crossed the podium. I dreamed of one day doing the same.

Over the years, I grew in craft. I was more selective in the workshops I chose because I finally knew the basics. I also began to emerge from my shell. I knew more people each year and looked forward to visiting with them. Yet, there were many long-time members I lacked the courage to approach. I still marveled at long rows of ribbons and those who won awards. I pitched nervously every year and wondered when I would find a publisher.

Several things happened to change all that. My writing became better…I knew I was getting closer to publication and wasn’t so nervous about whether or not I belonged in RMFW. I had a great support network within my critique groups and I began to identify myself as a writer not as someone who wrote. About the same time I contracted my first book, I experienced some pretty devastating life events but emerged stronger as my writing family reached out to me and I discovered strength I didn’t know I had. A move to the Denver metro area allowed me to attend more writing events and to volunteer.

All of a sudden, there was no doubt that I belonged. I took on more responsibility and sported more ribbons each year. Today, the ribbons no longer seem to matter. I’ve published and signed books and presented workshops and won awards and crossed that podium and spoken to the entire Colorado Gold group. I haven’t stood against the wall for years and nobody puts this baby in a corner (which doesn’t necessarily mean I am any less introverted—I just refuse to be defined as in introvert).

Still, I saw myself only as a seasoned writer. I didn’t put myself in the same league as the idols I’ve had all these years. I still don’t.

But…this year…there was a difference.

This year, as RMFW president, I spoke to first time attendees in an official capacity. Their reactions stunned me. Approximately one-hundred fifty people saw me as an expert. They eyed my ribbons with amazement. They approached me and said, “I’m sorry to interrupt you, but….” They were afraid to sit at my table during meals and treated me with deference. They all seemed to know my name…I was “the president.”

It felt odd, being looked up to that way—the way I used to look up to others. After all, I’m just a writer who volunteers.

That’s when it hit me.

I have become an old-timer.

There are still many who have been members of RMFW longer than I have. There are myriads of more experienced, more well-known, better writers than I am. They remain my idols and I don’t pretend to claim equality with them. But my role has changed.

I have responsibilities.

I am now a leader in RMFW and my duties include making sure the new members and fledgling writers find all that I have discovered within this organization. I hope I was able to at least make a start toward doing so.

Me…an old timer? Gee whiz!