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GOING ROGUE – THE INDIE REVOLUTION OF AARON MICHAEL RITCHEY

By Aaron Ritchey

I have become like Kurtz in the Congo.

I have gone native.  I am living in a hut, out in the jungle, and I’m writing books that don't have the approval of the British elite in London.

The horror!  The horror!

But do you know what?  It’s awesome and scary and nerve-wracking and freeing and sometimes I feel like Prometheus and sometimes I feel like the eagle eating Prometheus’s liver and sometimes I feel like Prometheus’s liver.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015 started like any normal day. I was struggling.  I’d gotten back some wicked, flesh-eating edits from an editor, and I’d gotten some ass-smacking criticism from one of my beta readers, and lastly, the small press who published my first novel The Never Prayer was going under.  On March 31, 2015, I was going to get my rights back.

I had always planned on going to another small publisher once my contract ended, and yet, on that Tuesday, I talked with my lovely wife and discussed the pros and cons.  Many of which I blogged about on this very blog – http://rmfw.org/get-big-by-going-small-the-top-five-reasons-to-publish-with-a-small-press.

Here’s the thing, a small press can be great—editing help, marketing help, cover help. But do you know what?  I think even more important, at least for me, was that it was another person in the world who believed in me.  Finding editors, cover artists, marketing help, all that takes only a bit of time and money.  But finding someone to believe in you?  That's priceless.

But how much is it worth?  Is it worth 30%, 50%, 70% of your royalties?  Is it worth someone else’s timeline?  Is it worth the waiting, the headaches, the general hassle of trying to squeeze yourself into someone’s else’s to-do list?  Because when you are with a publisher, you become a line item on someone’s to-do list, and unless you are bringing in fat stacks of cash, you aren’t their highest priority.  Even the ones that love your stuff.

No one will work harder on your writing career than you.  No one.  Unless, of course, you are making mad money, and then people will come out of the woodwork to “help” you.

On that fateful Tuesday, my wife and I decided we wanted to take hold of the reins. I still have other publishers I’m working with, but I am seizing control of my first three novels, including my newest novel which will hit the streets May 7, 2015.  You are all invited to the party at Hanson’s.

The name of my new publishing company will be Black Arrow Publishing because my stories have been forged by my father and his father before him.  The true king under the mountain.  And I aim to take down dragons.  Oh yes.

But in many ways, I have it easy.  I’ve had four publishers of various sizes like my work and want to publish it.  That really helps me.  I have huge respect for those authors who went Indie and they never had that kind of validation.  They have big ol' huevos of iron.

Still, it was hard for me to take this leap.

Part of it goes back to the original dream I had of becoming rich and famous.  I so wanted the huge literary agent, the six-figure book deal, the advance, the book tour, the Gulfstream personal jet, the whole Stephen King dream.

Going Indie meant having to mourn that dream all over again.  I wasn’t a princess in a castle adored by the big-five publishers.  I was just me.  Just a writer.

But who are my books for?  Are they for agents, editors, presses big, small, and in-between?

Not really.

In the end, my books are for the world and for the readers who read them.  I don’t know why I haven’t been loved and adored by millions.  I mean, my books seem to be well-written and people like them.  Goes back to validation.  Which I’m learning is cheap, cheaper than an empty Coke can in the gutter.

I still like the idea of the agent, the big publisher, the glory and teeth-gashing of that game.  And some of my projects will eventually go that route.

But other stories?  Man, I want to write books.  I want to write a lot of books.  And I’m tired of waiting on other people to help me get my books out into the world.

The time is now.

I’m going rogue.  I’ll get a developmental editor (Vivian Trask), a copy editor (Chris Devlin), a cover artist (Natasha Brown), and a formatter (Quincy J. Allen).  I’ll get help.

And with that help, I’ll shoot arrows at the sun, baby.

I’ll bring that star down and put it in my pocket.

Five Ways to Improve YOUR Conference Experience

Many (if not most) professional authors understand the value of attending writers' conferences. In addition to offering valuable writing tips and marketing classes, conferences provide an unparalleled opportunity to network and connect with other authors and industry professionals.

But are you getting the most from your conference experience?

Here are some tips for turning a fabulous, educational weekend into a practical boost for your writing career:

1. Identify your conference goals and make a "conference plan" before you go. Whether you're attending to improve your writing skills, develop a network of business contacts, find an agent, or simply re-connect with writing friends, you'll achieve the most success if you go in with a plan.

A conference plan doesn't have to be complicated (or even in writing, unless you like making lists). Think through your reasons for attending the conference. Why are you going? What do you hope to achieve? When you leave at the end of the weekend, what will you feel happy about accomplishing (or disappointed not to achieve)? Those are your conference goals.

Try to establish at least three goals for each conference: a personal goal (such as "meet and remember one new person each day"), a professional goal ("learn to pitch my book effectively in a single sentence"), and a "reach goal" - which could be anything from "finding an agent" to "learn how to use Twitter properly for my writing career." The key is making sure you have a range of goals, at least some of which are within your exclusive power to achieve.

2. Get involved! Teach, Volunteer, or Serve on a Conference Committee. It can be difficult to get panels or workshop teaching spots before you achieve publication, but try to find the places where your special skills or experiences can benefit the conference. If teaching isn't your thing, consider volunteering or joining the organizing committee. Making a personal investment in the conference's success can help you have a successful experience too.

3. Identify and attend conferences that focus on your genre. General conferences are great, and definitely worth attending, but many conferences also offer specialized experiences. Bouchercon (the World Mystery Convention), RWA National (for romance writers), and the Historical Novel Society Conference are merely three examples of national-level conferences that promote in specific types of writing. Local and regional conferences also offer topic-specific choices. Some are writers' conferences, while others cater primarily to readers. Find and attend the ones that work best for you.

4. Select a "home conference" to attend every year. It's nice to experience different types and sizes of conference, both to discover your personal preferences and to reach the broadest possible audience. However, it's also important to establish a presence at a conference where people can get to know you well. Having one conference you "always" attend can help develop your personal and professional networks, and offer a "safe harbor" where you always feel welcome and at home.

5. Have fun, and let it show. People are drawn to happy, confident people. Readers like authors whose attitude is friendly, open, and fun. Conferences may seem overwhelming (especially when you go in with a plan and have things you want to achieve) but don't forget--for many of us, a conference represents a chance to meet up with old friends, make new ones, and take a vacation from reality. For three, glorious days, you can be a writer---and only a writer-- around other people who love books and writing as much as you do. Take the time to enjoy it!

15C18 networking

And while you're looking for that conference home, may I recommend our own Colorado Gold? It's happening September 11-13, 2015, at the Denver Westin, and registration opens May 1. It's been my "conference home" since 2010, and I look forward to it all year. I hope to see you there in September!

Susan SpannSusan Spann is a California transactional attorney whose practice focuses on publishing law and business. She also writes the Shinobi Mysteries, featuring ninja detective Hiro Hattori and his Portuguese Jesuit sidekick, Father Mateo. Her debut novel, CLAWS OF THE CAT (Minotaur Books, 2013), was a Library Journal Mystery Debut of the Month and a finalist for the Silver Falchion Award for Best First Novel. BLADE OF THE SAMURAI (Shinobi Mystery #2), released in 2014, and the third installment, FLASK OF THE DRUNKEN MASTER, will release in July 2015. When not writing or practicing law, Susan raises seahorses and rare corals in her marine aquarium.You can find her online at her website (http://www.SusanSpann.com), on Facebook and on Twitter (@SusanSpann), where she founded and curates the #PubLaw hashtag.

Long Live the Oldest Profession: Pimping Your Book

By J.A. (Julie) Kazimer

Since none of my previous published novels have hit the bestseller lists, for which I blame you (you know who you are), I decided to try a new marketing approach for The Fairyland Murders – Blog Tours. Not the kind I set up for myself, on blogs I’d visited seven times already, with people already sick to death of me (again, you know who you are), but blog tours arranged by PR companies who specialize in this sort of thing.

People in the know. People willing to pimp my book for a small monitory gain.

I started to hatch my evil…I mean, marketing plan by typing in a quick google search for just these sort of companies. I found a surprising amount of them, each who boasted of great results for former blog tour authors. Determined to break out of my midlist funk, I settled one three of the big ones.

The first one I emailed offered a package deal for $99, including a facebook party launch. I filled out the form and waited. And waited. And waited. Luckily for me I hadn’t sent over the requested $99 via paypal yet. I finally heard back from them a week later. They claimed my form had gone to junk mail. Sure, that happens, so I wasn’t too concerned. Until my second email to their representative had the same result. If they couldn’t get back with me, imagine how the blog tour would go? I quickly moved on to blog book tour company 2.

At least they emailed me back within a day.

That is about all I can say was going for them. I opted for a book blast tour costing $50. Now it was encouraged that I also offer a gift card reward for those commenting as well as hosting my book blast. A goodwill gesture. I’m all for goodwill. I get that these bloggers’ time is worth something. They were doing me a favor after all.

Then again, when the tour happened, I felt sort of sleazy. Like the tour was set up merely to win this gift card, for blogger and commenter alike. Not that there were many commenters. In fact, on at least 75% of the blogs, the only comment was a thank you for hosting from the blog tour company. The remaining 25% had one or two other comments.

Not quite what I'd expected.

Which brings me to blog tour company 3. This one seemed to be the most organized, and yet, when it was all said and done, my money wasn’t well spent again. These blog readers weren’t in it to learn about new books, but rather to win free stuff. Not that I mind giving it away, but I’d like to give it away to people actually interested in what I had to say or at the very least in books.

Now I didn’t post this to whine, but rather to offer this bit of advice. Marketing is all about taking risks. I’m not sad that I tried this blog tour approach. I’m glad I did. Now I know for next time it doesn’t pay to use these companies. What does work, is setting up my own guest posts with blogs. Trying new and different things will keep you interested in your own marketing, and that will make for a happier author and readers.

Has anyone had a different experience when using a blog tour company?

Guest Post: Bonnie Biafore – Enough Already

Hi, I’m Bonnie. I’m a recovering workaholic.

The pace I kept was starting to affect my health and the quality of my writing. The friskiness and humor that are the hallmarks of my writing were disappearing faster than unguarded burgers when my dogs are around.

So…..I’m going to play devil’s advocate to some of the writing advice out there.

  1. Don’t write every day.

Writing isn’t like eating or breathing to me. Writing is my job and I’m trying hard to treat it as such. When I worked for a company, I had weekends and holidays off, and took vacations to recharge my batteries, sharpen the saw, fill in analogy here.

Working for myself was a different story. From 1999 to 2012, I worked close to 7 by 24. I’ve had relapses since then.

Now, I take time off from writing. Time off can be writing related: people-watching to get ideas for characters or traveling to get ideas for settings or storylines. Some time off, though, should be dedicated to total recharge.

  1. Don’t set a rigid writing schedule.

I do set a schedule. It just isn’t rigid. When I’m updating a book, I know I have to revise 15 pages a day, 5 days a week for 2 months. Which hours of the day or which days of the week aren’t as important to me. (OK, this is my full-time job so I get to set my work hours and days. Those of you with other jobs might not have this luxury.) There have been times—many times, when I sat down to write, and spun my wheels for 2 hours before I realized what was happening. If those 2 hours were my writing time, I’d have a word count of, say, 20 words for the day.

Now, I watch for spinning wheels. When I notice them, I stop and do something else. Sometimes, I simply switch to writing something easier. (With my non-fiction writing, some stuff is easier to write.) Or I might do something else that needs to get done.

A favorite trick of mine is to knock out a short to-do so I can scratch it off my list. The energy boost I get from completing a minor task is often enough for me to tackle something more difficult. Sometimes, a change of scenery helps. Write in a spiral-bound notebook instead of at the computer, or use a laptop computer to sit on the sofa, at a coffee shop, or in a train station.

  1. Walk away.

Many times, the spinning wheels come from a writing problem: opening sentences, chapter cliffhangers, or a sentence that just doesn’t sound right. I’ve learned to take a break, usually to walk the dogs. Invariably, I end up recording the sentences I need on my cell phone as I walk in the woods.

  1. Don’t follow other people’s advice!

Everyone is different, so what works for me might be disastrous for you. I know what time of day I’m most productive, the best time for creative work or drudgery. I’ve learned that when I wake up at 1am thinking about work, I need to turn on the light, work for an hour or so, and then go back to sleep. I know that when I get on a roll, I need to cancel other plans so I can make the most of that opportunity. I know when something I’ve written is right, even if others tell me to change it. I’m learning to recognize the days when my brain and body are crying “Uncle!” and then take the day off mostly without feeling guilty about it.

Go ahead. Listen to what others have to say. Then, figure out what works for you and what doesn’t.

----------------------------------------

End of rant here:

Writers are great. They work in a competitive, stressful industry, yet they share their knowledge and support each other’s endeavors. They work hard. They’re fun to be around.

Thanks for letting me be part of the group.

Setting Up Your Goals – Make Your Bed and Lie in it!

By J.A. (Julie) Kazimer

If you’re anything like me, and I know you are, your New Year’s resolution lasted until January 3rd. The 2nd if it involved not eating cake. Thankfully, for the sake of humanity, most of our writerly resolutions do not involve the consumption of baked goods.

However, they do include the dreaded word resolution, thereby dooming us yet again this year to failure. Therefore, I prefer to look at the start of each New Year as an opportunity to, a) eat lots of cake and b) set writerly goals rather than making resolutions I will never stick to, merely for the fact, it contains that vile word.

Goals are much less concrete to me, a place I’d like to be rather than meeting some expectation or commitment (and now you see why I’ve never been or will ever be married). Expectations equate to failure. Goals equate to trying your very best. Yes, it’s merely my own warped version of the same song, but it does help me accept and make new goals.

So my goals for this year are:

1) Write every day.

Yep. I blew that one by day 5. Now if I felt like this was a resolution, I’d simply give up and write like I normally do, which is whenever I feel like it. Since it’s a goal, I can easily get back on track.

2) Expand my marketing efforts.

By this I mean, I want to try new marketing avenues. I love facebook, but it’s never done me any good as a marketing tool. Therefore, I am no longer going to expend my energy on it (as a means of marketing, instead I will use it for my enjoyment as it was meant to be used, that and for whining about sports teams, mother-in-laws, and plagues). I’m going to look at more guerilla marketing based tricks. I might be sharing more depending on how things go.

3) Finish the manuscripts I have waiting on my desktop.

Remember that vampire/zombie interstellar romance you wrote 10 years ago? No? Me…neither. Stupid concept…Anyway, some books are left half written because they suck. But others, like a few I’ve abandoned over the years, are good books that just needed more time to percolate. This year I am getting out the red pen and working on those manuscripts.

How about you? What are your goals for this year? What would you like to do more of (if you had the time)?

Friendly Author Mutates Into Envious Villain – Film at Eleven

By Aaron Ritchey

So, in a story, you have the hero with a flaw who overcomes their flaw to beat the villain and win the day. Hurray! We all love a good story arc because it gives us hope—deliriously flawed creatures that we are.

Let’s flash back, oh, I don’t know, five years. I was a writer full of envy. I couldn’t go into bookstores because all the names and all the covers reminded me that I had so far to go and I probably would never get there. While other people had. At conferences, I met those successful people and my jealousy raged! I withdrew to my underground lair to seethe in isolation.

Yet I soldiered on. I was the heroic writer. I practiced celebrating the victories of my writer friends. I went to book stores and enjoyed the hunt. I overcame my jealousy.

Five years later, I am published. I have books out in the world. And my envy was dead. I had slain the dragon. Or if this was Disney, I had engineered the demise of the villain without doing anything blatantly violent. Like shanking them for instance. You don’t see a lot of Disney villains getting shanked nowadays.

Victorious! My envy was gone!

Then, something happened to me that people hate in stories. I went backwards. I began to compare my career with other writers. I began to look on Amazon, not for books, but for other people’s rankings. Were their rankings better than mine?

Slowly, the envy demon slid back into my soul, like this was season thirteen of Supernatural and once again, either Sam or Dean was all secretly evil and stuff. I hated. I loathed. I envied.

They say a rising tide raises all ships, that the success of one writer nurtures the success of others. I didn’t care about that. I wanted to torpedo their ships, watch their decks sprout fire, and then laugh as the black water sucked ‘em down.

So yeah, no character arc for me.

Then I picked up Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One (Amazon ranking is 620 with over 4,000 reviews). I started listening to the audio book; Wil Wheaton does the narration, and man, that book is JOYFUL! Mr. Cline breaks the “rules” left and right: he has long pages of exposition, he doesn’t have an inciting incident for like fifty pages, and then he zaps the tension right when he could’ve put on the screws. So yeah, I can pick it apart, I can get envious, but do you know what?

The book won’t let me. Because there is JOY in the pages. He wrote the story he wanted the way he wanted; he throws in 80s references in his supposedly young adult novel that even I don’t get, and I was a teenager right smack dab in the frickin’ 80s. In the end, the book is so very wonderful. I don’t want it to end. My life is better, richer, because Ernest Cline wrote Ready Player One.

Where does this leave my envy? In tatters. Yes, I can envy him and his success, but that doesn’t feel right because though I want to hate him, I can’t. I can only celebrate his story.

Loving Ernest Cline’s book to loving my own stuff might seem like a big leap, but it’s not.

The wonder of being an author is that I get to write books I love. I get to choose the kinds of characters I like, put in the story twists that always shock me, and have tears, lots of tears and emotion.

This is the reality of being human versus being a character in a story. Being human means I will always cycle around to envy; I’m just built that way. However, getting unstuck from envy, or despair, or resentment, or any of the other emotions gets easier the more I write and the more I do all that authorly stuff I need to do to be successful.

The morass of self-pity gets shallower each time I find myself trudging through the well-trudged mud.

Like playing a video game. That Cyberdemon from Doom was hard to kill the first time, and even the second, and even third, but the more I played, the easier it got.

Ready Player One.

A Book List for Holiday Shopping — Part One

RMFW member Bree Ervin suggested we publish lists of books available from RMFW members to help everyone with holiday shopping. Is there anything better to give as a gift than a book? Well, for obvious reasons, we think books should top your list.

I started by putting out a call to RMFW members to submit a teeny-mini-synopsis, cover art, and purchase information. Here's the first installment. Note that books are listed in the order I received the author's information.

Forkner_Waking Up JoyWaking Up Joy
by Tina Ann Forkner
Tule Publishing
Available in paperback and ebook

"Behind every lost dream lies a second chance…when adored town spinster Joy Talley ends up in a coma after a peculiar accident, she is surprised and incensed to hear what is being said in her hospital room, including plans for her funeral. When she finally wakes, her well-meaning, but bossy, brothers and sisters dismiss her claims, thinking her accident has knocked her off her rocker, but Joy has never felt better, and is determined to set the past right."

~~~~~~~~~~

The Spy Bride Risky Brides Boxed Set final CoverRisky Brides
by Bayard & Holmes, Vicki Hinze, Kathy Carmichael, Donna Fletcher, Rita Herron
Magnolia Press
Available in hardcover, paperback, and ebook

"Find your next must-read author in this limited-time-only collection from USA Today Bestsellers Vicki Hinze, Rita Herron, Donna Fletcher, Peggy Webb, Kathy Carmichael, veteran authors Kimberly Llewellyn and Tara Randel, and dynamic newcomers Bayard & Holmes. 8 novels and novellas, 8 genres, and 8 unique takes on what it means to be a risky bride for only $0.99."

~~~~~~~~~

Tides of Maritinia
by Warren Hammond
Harper Voyager Impulse
ebook release 12/2/14, mass maker paperback 1/20/15

"Tides tells the story of an assassin on a mission to overthrow the despotic regime of a far-flung world. Working undercover, he'll soon find himself trapped in a web of conflicting loyalties that will leave him wondering who his true enemies are."

~~~~~~~~~~

CallDownTheMoon_w9128_100Call Down the Moon
by Mary Gillgannon
The Wild Rose Press
Currently available in print; ebook releases 12/29/14

"In the ninth century, Irish warrior Connar fell hopelessly in love with Aisling. When she came to a tragic end, he used magic to travel to the future to be reunited with her. In modern Denver, he must fight a treacherous enemy from the past and win the heart of his beloved, now Allison Hunter, all over again."

~~~~~~~~~~

viewfromhereThe View From Here
Cindy Myers
Kensington Books
Available in trade paper, ebook and audiobook

"When newly divorced Maggie Stevens inherits a gold mine from the father she never knew, she travels to the small Rocky Mountain town of Eureka, Colorado and learns that it takes a village to heal a broken heart. Book one in the Eureka, Colorado series. Winner of the Colorado Book Award, 2013."

~~~~~~~~~~

Trapline Cover with Kirkus QuoteTrapline
by Mark Stevens
Midnight Ink
Paperback

"A badly chewed-up corpse high in the Flat Tops Wilderness leaves Colorado hunting guide Allison Coil mystified and wary. Obvious signs suggest the dead man is the victim of a mountain lion attack but Allison’s wilderness-savvy bones scream otherwise."

~~~~~~~~~~

book-brokentrustBroken Trust
by Shannon Baker
Midnight Ink
Trade paperback and ebook

"A fast-paced mix of Hopi Indians, wierd science, and murder, set in Boulder, Colorado."

~~~~~~~~~~

Nowak_ChangesChanges (Winner of the Colorado Book Award for Genre Fiction and the HOLT Award of Merit)
by Pamela Nowak
Five Star/Gale
Hardcover and ebook

"What begins as a quest for justice becomes a search for identity as part-Sioux librarian Lise Dupree encounters ambitious district attorney Zach Spencer in an 1879 legal battle that will force them both to change the roles they have created for themselves. Their struggle leads them to confront Lise's haunting past, Zach's political aspirations, the dangerous prejudice of an unstable Indian agent, and the subtle differences between justice and the law."

~~~~~~~~~~

The Fairyland Murders_ebook (1)The Fairyland Murders
by J.A. Kazimer
Kensington Books
ebook and trade

"Blue Reynolds knows the darker side of New Never City--the side that's hopped-up on fairy dust and doesn't care if your house gets blown down. Rent's due and his PI business is all but make believe, but even Blue shudders at having to chase after the tooth fairy, Isabella Davis, a freckle-nosed redhead five feet tall on her tip-toes...if you don't count the pretty pink wings."

~~~~~~~~~~

DuvallDemon Fare
by Cory Dale
Karen Duvall
Paperback and ebook

In an alternate history New York City, steam engines rule, and demon-powered technology is the up and coming thing. A half-demon taxi driver and an exorcist become partners to stop the rogue demons, and a tyrant who controls them, from taking over the city.

~~~~~~~~~~

Burn OutBurn Out
by Kristi Helvig
Egmont USA
Hardcover

"Most people want to save the world; seventeen-year-old Tora Reynolds just wants to get the hell off of it. One of the last survivors in Earth's final years, Tora years to escape the wasteland her planet has become after the sun turns "red giant," but discovers her fellow survivors are even deadlier than the hostile environment."

Five Reasons Why J.A. Kazimer is Better Than Me

By Aaron Ritchey

Many of you know J.A. Kazimer’s normal persona, but this blog post isn’t about J.A. Kazimer the person, it’s about J.A. Kazimer the RMFW scion, the writerly icon, the literary messiah! This is about the Platonic ideal of J.A. Kazimer.

I first met her in Colorado Springs many years ago and right away I was immensely impressed by her quiet awesomeness.  So yes, I didn't come to bury J.A. Kazimer, only to praise her.  Here are five ways J.A. Kazimer is intrinsically better than me:

  1. NETWORKING EMPRESS – When I hit the doors of a conference, I am loud, outlandish, an explosion of personality. Yeah, I somehow make that work, but Kazimer’s way is far less showy, but also effective. She talks to people and listens to them, which is the key to networking. Asking questions, listening to the answers, and making connections with people. Kazimer does this so effectively you suddenly just love her. She is proof you don’t have to be an extrovert in a loud suit to network well.
  2. MARKETING MAGICIAN – When her first book, CURSES! came out, she started up a series on her blog called “The New Never News - Your #1 Source of Fairytale News,” and you could tell she had a great time writing about current events in Fairytale land. At the same time, I went to her release party where she had killer swag and a grand guest list, but she wasn’t exactly thrilled to be in the spotlight. This proves she can do the stuff she likes and she can do the stuff she might not be comfortable with, but that’s the marketing game. A little sweet. A little sour.
  3. QUERYING GODDESS – The real reason why I adore J.A. Kazimer is that she encouraged me to query agents and editors. I would write all the time, but I was too afraid to send stuff out. Not her. She actually posted on Facebook she missed the querying process. She is a warrior! And why not? Querying is all about the possibility of wonder and success. It should be an exciting process, and Kazimer embraced it so much she actually misses the process. Yes, ladies and gentleman, she is agented, which is quite the feat nowadays.
  4. INSPIRATION GURU – So Kazimer writes books for Kensington, she writes Indie stuff, but she is out there, working, struggling, playing the game. I find that amazingly inspiring, so when I get frustrated, I just ask myself, what would J.A. Kazimer do? The answer is write books and get them published by any means necessary.
  5. ACCOMPLISHED AUTHOR – So not only can she do the marketing and work it takes to be an author in the 21st century, she can also deliver goods. Her book, The Assassin’s Heart, is a Gold Top Pick by RT Book Reviews! Just to brag about her a little, the reviewer says, “Not only is this novel sassy and fun, but the author’s research into the CIA and the life of an assassin is reflected in her work, making it not just a fabulous romantic suspense tale, but a fantastic work of fiction, period.”

At the end of the day, I hope this blog post embarrasses the hell out of J.A. Kazimer, but too many times in this long road to writerly success, we have to toot our own horns, talk about our stuff like it’s God’s gift to the English language, and shake our moneymakers. I wanted to shine a light on a soldier in the field because she truly is a wonderful human being and one of the best folks I’ve met on this utterly strange, literary journey I’m on.

 

 

Five Reasons Why Stephen King Must DIE!

By Aaron Ritchey

Whenever I meet anyone who doesn't like Stephen King, I immediately mistrust and I hate them.  I’m a HUGE Stephen King fan, and I just finished reading 11/22/63, which is just one of his many masterpieces.

Yes, I am a Stephen King fan, but I also am full of envy and hate.  He’s too good.  I revel in his genius and then despise him for his craft.  At times, he’s so good I want to kill him dead and then eat his heart and absorb his storytelling spirit.  Wasn't that like a story in Night Shift?

Anyway, here’s why Stephen King must die because he is just too good:

  • THE DEVIL: Many of my friends think Stephen King doesn't need an editor, more like a chainsaw, to cut his books in half or more. I whole-heartedly disagree. The brilliance of Stephen King is that he sets up his world with such details that you are immersed in the experience.  He uses the senses, he uses ad slogans, he uses the minutia of the day-to-day to create a world so tangible, so real, that when in introduces the big, bad wolf, we readers are unnerved.  Stephen King has mastered the idea that the devil is in the details, and yeah, he writes horror, so at times, it’s actually a physical devil.  If there is one area I need to improve, it’s on adding details to setting, to characters, to really create the world of my story in the reader’s mind.  In On Writing, King argues that reading a novel is actually telepathy—his thoughts are transferred into our minds and we see what he sees and feel what he feels.  How does he do that?  Through details.
  • HIGH NOON: Stephen King writes page-turners. Why?  Because he knows all about    Sometimes he does it subtly, sometimes blatantly.  It’s why reading his books is so addictive.  He will write something like, “And that was the last time Ed saw his wife alive.”  Right away, we want to know what is going to happen to Ed’s wife!  Yeah, blatant foreshadowing, but it works.  Also, what I love about King is that he will set up the big High Noon gunfight, to give us something to worry about, to look forward to, and every page brings us closer and closer to that inevitable crescendo of violence.  In The Wolves of the Calla, most of the book is in anticipation of the big gun fight, and it kept me turning pages.
  • QUICK KISSES: So we have the big high noon gunfight in the distance. In 11/22/63, it was trying to stop the Kennedy assassination.  However, he gives us pay-offs along the way.  While the High Noon climax is the macro-foreshadowing (as is the mystery of Ed’s wife), he also uses micro-foreshadowing, but he doesn’t keep us dangling in an anticipation for long.  These are like quick kisses of satisfaction.  He introduces story questions, sets it up so we are curious, and then answers them in the same chapter.  Again, this keeps us reading because we want to know!  He doesn’t just give us the answers right away, but keeps us on edge.  Which is another reason why his books are so long.  They have to be, to enjoy the experience.
  • MOTHER’S MILK: So we are plunged into a very real world with lots of details.  We have the High Noon gunfight in the distance.  We have quick kisses of satisfying story answers along the way, but in the mix are layers of conflict that keep us breathless.  Or at least with a niggling bit of anxiety about what might happen.  King milks conflict.  I can’t tell you how many books I’ve read where the conflict is a single layer that is wrapped up quickly.    Please, keep me on edge.  For example, 11/22/63, we have the homeless guy outside of the time portal.  He’s not right. He’s crazy, and we know, he holds the answers, but King keeps him silent because he adds another dimension to the conflict. As does the romance with the high school librarian.  As does the evil bookies who realize our hero knows way too much about the past to be lucky.  Throw in a psychotic gunman trying to kill the president, and the conflicts add up.
  • THE DAREDEVIL: King writes fast, writes his heart, shoots from the hip. His novels aren’t perfect, but perfection is overrated.  The Walking Dead is a popular show not because it’s perfect, but because it gets certain things right, the important things. So too, Stephen King gets the basics just right.  Not perfect, but right.

So yes, King is a master, and, really, I don’t want him dead. He’s good, but he’s spent a lifetime working on his craft and taking chances. I will read his books until the Grim Reaper drags either him or me into that cold grave.

 

 

 

Animals as Secondary Characters

Hi, I'm Robin D. Owens and I write fantasy romance for Berkley-Penguin-Random House (the "Heart" Series – 13 going on 14). I also write the Ghost Seer paranormal romance series for Berkley (Ghost Seer out last April, Ghost Layer recently released in September and Ghost Killer out next February). I wrote a five book series of fantasy for women (the "Summoning" series) for Luna Books.

I'm known for my animal or Familiar companions, and I'm quite sure that Zanth, the telepathic cat with attitude (redundant), sold my first book, HeartMate. Since then, in the Heart books, I've had kittens, cats, dogs, foxes, a raccoon and a hawk as my Fams – along with a wandering mole, etc.

In my Summoning series I have some magical beings who shapeshift into various animals. Miniature greyhounds and warhawks are the most common, though occasionally they have their catlike moments. I also have flying horses.

These characters are in the books for several reasons: mentors, friends, comic relief and occasionally under threat (they can get into trouble and some go to war). In the Summoning books, they also play a mysterious part in shaping the worlds' events.

You might call them archetypical characters. Mentors who advise (and may have their own agendas which also make them tricksters). Friends who are there to listen or nudge or nag (so, that's still a horse word but at least it wasn't badger...). Comic relief: this I use quite a bit, I like my tension built, released and built again.

The Ghost Seer series has a ghost Labrador as a spirit guide and all around cheerleader.

Things to watch for when you're writing animals. First, my cats are pretty much cats, except they are slightly more intelligent and can speak telepathically. They are self-centered, they live in the moment, they have contradictions in whatever philosophy they have but it has meaning to them at the time. They're vain. They call all cats "Cats," capitalized, and all dogs "dogs," NEVER capitalized. They look down on dogs. And they negotiate payment for favors.

I try to keep my animals close to what they are here on earth, and with those limitations. My puppy in Heart Thief adores her FamWoman...and piddles on the rug. My crippled and starving Noble Hound in Heart Fate resents having to eat leftovers that a hunting cat "generously" gives him. He looks down on cats because they aren't as loyal as dogs. The Ghost Seer dog, Enzo, is determinedly cheerful.

For research...I have cats and my ex-roomie had a puppy. I observed. There is a strategically vital place in my house and each and every one of my cats has found it and held it.

I read a lot of books on foxes and there are some in the neighborhood. Another thing, THE expert on foxes call a noise they make "chortling." Maybe the sound is closer to chortling than the standard, well-known "barking." If I used "chortling," it would pull my reader from the story to think about the word which is not something associated with foxes....

The mole came in handy in a couple of the stories and a fan who liked moles and stuck the idea in my head provided critique and tips.

I have friends who have horses and I studied "natural" horsemanship, went to a horse camp (I live in the city) given by another writer who has Lipizzaners.

So, from my point of view, don't make them too cute, or too smart, and keep them lifelike. People will love them anyway.

May all your writing dreams come true.