PubCon 2017, Early Bird Pricing Ends March 31st

PubCon 2017

Saturday, April 29, 2017, 8:30 am - 4:00 pm
Table Mountain Inn
1310 Washington Avenue
Golden, CO 80401

REGISTER NOW

Schedule

Morning Session | 9:00 am - 12:00 pm | Traditional Publishing

Our panel of experts will discuss the process writers who want to be traditionally published will likely follow. This includes finding and submitting to the right agent, editing, how the agent determines the best houses to submit work to, what the editors look for when they receive a submission, how the process of contracting for a book works, basic information on royalties, who has the responsibility for different parts of the process, time frames, the non-writing parts authors will deal with, marketing, and many other aspects of being traditionally published. During the workshop, attendees will be able to place questions in a box and they will be drawn and answered randomly, as time allows at the end of the workshop. Speakers include Gina Panettieri, Linda Hull, and Ben LeRoy.

Lunch Keynote | 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm | Susan Brooks

Each author's path to publishing is as unique as they are. Susan Brooks will discuss the differences and similarities between self-publishing, indie publishing, and the big 5 publishers to help authors decide which path to publishing might be the best fit.

Afternoon Session | 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm | Self-Publishing

Our panel of self-publishing experts will discuss the process of self-publishing your book, including how to know if/when your manuscript is ready, front and back matter, cover art/fonts/copyrighted images, determining keywords and placement for your genre, what self-publishing platforms are available, potential costs and revenue, being a “publisher,” where to look for help, various types of marketing, budgeting, timelines pre-and-post release, and much, much more. Speakers include Lisa Manifold, Bernadette Marie, and Nick Zelinger.

Pricing

Early-bird registration through March 31
Full Day | Members $70.00, Non-members $80.00
Half Day* | Members $40.00, Non-members $45.00

Regular registration April 1 - April 21
Full Day | Members $80.00, Non-members $90.00
Half Day* | Members $45.00, Non-members $50.00

*Half-day registration includes either breakfast with the morning session or lunch with the afternoon session.

Speakers

Gina PanettieriGina Panettieri | President and Editor, Talcott Notch Literary

Being an agent is all Gina can imagine doing. Books, and the amazing people who write them, have been the focus of her life for more than two decades. It makes her feel like her inbox is Santa's magical Christmas bag. It's always full, always overflowing, but brimming with the potential of something spectacular. All I've got to do is pull the little ribbon... With fiction, I love quirky, edgy characters, women's fiction, paranormal, urban fantasy, horror, science fiction, historical, mystery, thrillers and suspense.

Linda HullLinda Hull | Author of the Mrs. Frugalicious mystery series, freelance editor

Linda is a native of Saint Louis, Missouri, but currently resides in Denver, Colorado. She is a longtime member and former president of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers and is currently on the board of Mystery Writers of America. She was also honored to be named the 2013 Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers’ Writer of the Year. Her debut novel, The Big Bang, was published by Tyrus Books in 2013. Frog Kisses, her romantic comedy, was published by Literary Wanderlust in 2015. Linda is also the author of Eternally 21, Black Thursday, and Sweetheart Deal, the first three titles in the Mrs. Frugalicious mystery series.

Ben LeRoyBen LeRoy | Editor with Tyrus Books

 

 

 

 

SusanSusan Brooks Brooks | Editor-in-Chief, Literary Wanderlust

Susan has been on the board for Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers since 2009. She holds a master’s degree in publishing from George Washington University and has many years of editorial experience, including working as a developmental editor, acquisition editor, proofreader, managing editor, and production manager. You can follow her at @oosuzieq on Twitter and read her syndicated blog on writing craft at susanbrooks.wordpress.com.

 

Lisa ManifoldLisa Manifold | Multi-Self-Published Author

Lisa is the RMFW 2016 Independent Writer of the Year. She is the author of the Sisters of the Curse series, based on the Grimm Brothers fairy tale The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Her new series, The Heart of the Djinn, is a trilogy that shows what happens when a free-lancing djinn does his own thing. Three Wishes, the first book in The Heart of the Djinn series, is out now. Book two, Forgotten Wishes, will be out soon! Her new Realm trilogy will feature Brennan, the Goblin King, making his debut.

Bernadette MarieBernadette Marie | Bestselling Author, Owner of 5-Prince Publishing

Bestselling Author Bernadette Marie is known for building families readers want to be part of. Her series The Keller Family has graced bestseller charts since its release in 2011, along with her other series and single title books. The married mother of five sons promises Happily Ever After always…and says she can write it, because she lives it. A chronic entrepreneur, Bernadette Marie opened her own publishing house in 2011, 5 Prince Publishing, so that she could publish the books she liked to write and help make the dreams of other aspiring authors come true too. Bernadette Marie is also the CEO of Illumination Author Events.

Nick ZelingerNick Zelinger | NZ Graphics

A book designer for over 25 years, Nick has worked for ad agencies and printing companies; been an art director for an aviation magazine; designed product packaging for sports and fitness manufacturers; created large signage for store fronts, company vehicles and Rapid Transit; designed promotional material for the Denver Broncos, Colorado Rockies, KOA Radio and Clear Channel. His cover and book designs have earned his clients more than 100 national and international awards, such as Best Cover Design by USA Book News, the Indie Excellence Book Award, Foreword Reviews Book of the Year, Next Generation Finalist Awards, Global eBook Awards, CIPA’s EVVY Awards, The San Francisco Book Festival Awards, and many more. Nick is also the co-author of Another Nightmare Gig from Hell: Musicians Tales of Wonder and Woe. He has been a recording and performing musician since the age of 16. He currently serves on the board of AuthorU.org, and is an Associate Member of the Colorado Independent Publishers Association (CIPA).

Go to it! (Pursue what makes you come alive!)

I read the most touching article last week. Written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a well known children’s author and filmmaker. It was titled, “You May Want to Marry My Husband.” It was written along the lines of a match.com profile, and it described the charms, kindnesses, and deep expressions of love her husband had shown her over their 26-year marriage.

Eight days later, Amy, 51, would pass away from ovarian cancer.

Tragic, yes, but what I discovered about Amy after reading the article made me think of my RMFW friends, and the joys and challenges inherent with the creative path we’ve all chosen.

One of Amy’s tenets was included in her obituary. “I tend to believe whatever you decide to look for you will find, whatever you beckon will eventually beckon you," she said during a 2012 TED talk.

I watched that TED talk and her message inspired me, so I am sharing it with you.

Amy begins by talking about coincidences such as the proliferation of “7” in our lives—seven days in the week, seven colors in the rainbow, seven wonders of the world. Seven music notes. Her TED talk is called “Seven Notes on Life.”

She mentioned walking the beach with her mother-in-law, when she discovered a heart-shaped pebble. Once she had seen that first one, she looked for another, and found many heart-shaped pebbles. Her mother-in-law was astonished, but Amy was not. She had observed many times that we find that which we seek out. “When our eyes are open, there is a subtle shifting of awareness.”

To demonstrate, she told the TED audience that she would imagine that she was speaking to a totally red audience, and once she focused on that, she would see instantly all the red clothing there.

She went through the seven musical notes. “F” stood for, “Figure it out as you go.” We don’t have to have it all mapped out before we embark on something new. Get a good idea, invest in it, and learn and adjust as we go.

These thoughts and others inspired me, but what left the lasting impression—the one that made me feel connected to you, my RMFW friends, was this: All the cell phones, iPads, laptops, and other technical devices create a huge amount of technical “noise” in our lives. All that modern noise demands something from us—a reaction.  Once we turn off the cell phones and all the technical “noise” in our lives, we become disconnected from the chatter, and are left with empty space. And what do we find in that newly empty space?

It is no coincidence, she pointed out, that with the individual letters rearranged, another important word emerges from “reaction.”

REACTION {changes to} ….. CREATION.

She ended the talk with a quote from Howard Thurman:

            Ask not what the world needs.

            Ask what makes you come alive.

            And go to it.

What we need is people who have come alive. What, Amy asked, makes you come alive?

Go to it. Move toward what makes you come alive.

------------------------

A Chicago native and longtime resident, Rosenthal completed more than 30 books, including journals, memoirs and the best-selling picture stories "Uni the Unicorn" and "Duck! Rabbit!" She made short films and YouTube videos, gave TED talks and provided radio commentary for NPR, among others. Her loving optimism will be missed.

Read more: http://www.haaretz.com/us-news/1.777097

The TED talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxWgIccldh4

Distractions: Writing, Wait, Cleaning. No! Writing! New Computer! No! Writing. Promotion…

I should be preparing for a trip I'm leaving for later this morning, but I'm running late on the blog, and, let's face it, will I want to finish it up in California? No.

Wait . . . the airport. I could do it on the plane or at the airport (I intend to arrive two hours early, as usual). I could do it then. Face it, ramblings about the writing life, which I usually do here on the blog, are not research intensive, and are, in fact internals, which is the easiest writing for me. Well, in addition to having an intelligent Familiar Companion animal saunter, stroll, or zoom onto the page. Those scenes tend to write themselves, too.

As you must have figured out from the above, distractions are, for me, a terrible thing. Even cleaning can be a distraction, even (whispering), washing silverware (which I always leave for last).

The moment I got my first computer, I took the games off it, the solitaire, whatever. (We won't go into online gaming right now). This was to keep myself focused on writing.

Naturally, I had a day job, so I wrote in the evenings. I lost years of popular television shows, because, like most traditionally published people, it took between 8-9 years for my first manuscript to sell. Those bad old days.

I had to focus, or I wouldn't work on my writing after my regular eight hours of work, and that was the most disciplined time in my life (except the 3 jobs in grad school).

But now that I'm a professional writer. . . my focus is usually fragmented at best, even when I'm at retreats where all I'm supposed to do is write. "I can make my wordcount in two hours today, I'll do it later." I tell myself almost every day. This is a blatant lie. I can make a minimum wordcount in two hours with the great blessing of steady inspiration from the muse. I believe my lie anyway.

Laundry is important. Cleaning is important. Definitely loading up a new computer for my travels with all the right software is important.

Exercise, for me right now, is hugely important.

Most important is promotion of my novella, especially that which is self-published. I can really get side-railed by that, because it, too, can bring money in.

But writing should be the number one priority. It is the way I support myself and my two cats (they do not lift a PAW).

Still, distractions abide. So, I turn to the tried and true to help me through:

1) War room. I belong to a chat room where writers meet and do writing sprints. Sometimes it's too chatty, sometimes I'm the only one there. At those times, I have to shore up my own focus.

2) Timer. This is good. Butt in chair for 30 minutes, set the timer, write. Do NOT go back and re-read that previous scene for the 20th time. JUST. WRITE. This can get me (you?) through the "thinking" time.

3) Setting Goals With Other Writers. I belong to such a group, we post goals and results every week.

But, most of all, is just RECOGNIZING MY PROBLEM WITH DISTRACTIONS, AND PUTTING MY BUT IN THE CHAIR AND WRITING.

Easy to understand, easy to say, but hard to execute. But I WILL do that. Because that's what professionals do.

Wait, doesn't the fireplace need brushing out? (Just joking, I don't have a working fireplace).

May the muse be with you and your writing and your worlds push all distractions from your minds.

Robin

Rocky Mountain Writer #75

Abby J. Reed & When Planets Fall

Abby J. Reed is the guest with her first novel, When Planets Fall.

The young adult science fiction fantasy comes out later this spring from Soul Mate Press and it has already drawn nifty advance praise.

Kirkus Reviews has already called it “propulsive” and “sharply crafted.”

On the podcast, Abby talks about a disorder she deals with called chronic migraine and how it ties in with the characters and events on her distant planet in a galaxy far, far away.

She also tells us about the Twitter pitch that led to her publishing deal and she’s got some excellent ideas about how to define success.

Abby J. Reed writes young adult science fiction and fantasy novels that ask what if?. She has a degree in English Writing and lives in Colorado with her husband and two fluffy pups.

First up on this episode Rocky Mountain Writer is a fresh installment of Writer’s Rehab with Natasha Watts. This time, Natasha has some great tips to make sure your writing doesn’t lose its your point of view - or even begin to wander.

More about Abby J. Reed

Intro music by Moby Gratis

Outro music by Dan-o-Songs

For suggestions about content or to comment on the show, email Mark Stevens. Also feel free to leave a comment about the podcast on iTunes or your favorite podcast provider.

Host Mark Stevens: http://www.writermarkstevens.com

After the Editing: When an agent says it’s ready!

Not that long ago I put up a post about what it's like editing with an agent. Well it's time to take that a step farther. Because Deity Six, my very first completed novel, has since transitioned from 1) finding an agent. And 2) going through and finishing edits with said agent. To step 3) searching for and acquiring an editor and a publishing deal. With steps 4) and maybe even 5) to be determined at a later date. So let's explore Step 3 and those smaller steps in-between.

Developmental edits:

Before this post I talked about the beginning steps of agent editing. Now here's the ending. While you're editing with your agent, unless you're book is perfect (Ha, ahahahahahaha!!!!!), you'll likely go through what are called developmental edits. These are basically how they sound; edits that address any issues with plot, characters, or things like theme.

Being as close to your book as you likely are, you probably can't see some of its problems. And even if you can, you may not know how to fix them. This being the case, your agent will go through and identify (often line by line) some of the problems that require adjustment, or even removal before the book is ready to move onto the next phase of its life.  This can go on for... a while.

For me it lasted about three months from the time I signed the contract with my agent. Yours could be faster, or longer. Either way it will be different according to the needs of your story, and how dramatic of a tantrum you feel like throwing when your agent tells you cut an entire five pages (or chapters) out of the book!  After you've made the necessary changes (and note that these are generally optional and not required by your agent, but advised before moving on), hopefully your story is in much better shape. And it's time to move on to...

Copy edits:

So far, my experience with copy edits is thus: "Hi Josh, doesn't look like we need to do any more developmental edits. I'm performing some copy edits, then it'll be ready to go out." The book didn't come back to me again, so my assumption is that whatever changes were made to the story were all so minor as not require either my attention, or my approval (such as typos and minor re-wording). So...whoopie!

Submission time:

The next part is perhaps the worst for many. This is where your agent embarks on putting the book into the "real world." And by "real world," I mean editors currently acquiring works like yours, for publishers who publish books like yours.

So here's the process as I understand it: Your agent identifies editors looking for ideas similar to yours, or enough like yours to be interested in taking it on as an editing project in order to then publish the book, and/or offer you, the author, a publishing contract. A partial submission goes to the editor. If the editor isn't interested, they reject it (duh). If they do like it they request a full manuscript, which your agent sends to them.

Now for that pie in that sky. If the editor likes the book the process doesn't end there. They then give it to some of their peers (other editors). If they like it, it then moves on to the editorial manager. If the manager likes it and agrees with the acquiring editor that the publishing house should represent it (i.e. they think they will make money off of it), then you will be offered a contract.

**Note: I have no details on this just yet and may cover it in a future post when I can offer firsthand experience. As of the writing of this post I have been updated about three occurrences following the release of my book to acquiring editors. Two rejections, as it did not fit into a specific category they were looking to use it for. And one request for the full manuscript. So... fingers crossed.

The Big Wait:

For now, this is the line in the sand. As me and my agent wait for the editor to read the full manuscript and either reject it, or send it on for approval from their higher ups. It's all about waiting now. So when you get to this part remember...this can take months. Months, and months, with a chance that you will only get a rejection. But this is the world we live in. This is the altar to which we pray, sacrifice, and divvy up an unhealthy portion of our souls to these gatekeepers of traditional publishing bliss. So settle in, buck'o's. It's going to be a long winter.

Magic-Wand Words

Remember the Disney production of Cinderella, when the good witches waved their magic wands of blue, red and green? Their glitter flowed like Fourth of July sparklers, creating magic.

That’s what my blog is about this month—the magic that happens with words. In an entire novel, only a few or at most several dozen of them may appear. When they do, they connect us to the characters, embed us more deeply in the setting and emotions of the scene, and increase our enjoyment and understanding of the story. They linger in our memories.

These are a few of my favorite magic-wand words. Enjoy! May these words that so inspired me also inspire you to dig deeper in your creative reservoir. May your current work in progress sparkle!

Nora Roberts, Spellbound:  

… an exquisite simile

And she was there, just there, conjured up out of storm-whipped air. Her hair was a firefall over a dove-gray cloak, alabaster skin with the faint bloom of rose, a generous mouth just curved in knowledge. And eyes as blue as a living star and just as filled with power.

Nora Roberts, Public Secrets

... another one

She would remember the feel of the air against her face, air so moist from the sea it might have been tears.

 Nora Roberts, Sanctuary

… a character-enriching analogy

She walked to the water’s edge, let the surf foam over her ankles. There, she thought when the tide swept back and sucked the sand down over her feet. That was exactly the same sensation he was causing in her. That slight and exciting imbalance, that feeling of having the ground shift under you no matter how firmly you planted your feet.

Katie Schneider, All We Know of Love  

...melding scene and character

The clouds are pulled thin like cotton. I understand how they feel, out in the middle of nowhere, unsure of quite where they’re heading.

Laura Kinsale, Flowers from the Storm

…skillful use of the senses

“I saw you in India.” Mrs. Humphrey had about her the slightly sour tang of an unchanged baby. “You took my clothes off.”

…expression of fury, revenge, stunning rhythm and great example of back-loading

He thought of the look on the Ape’s face, the relish of terror, the time it would take; he’d once seen two men hanged and quartered—the expression of the second condemned traitor as he watched the executioner cut down and butcher the first: that was the fear, that was the struggle, the prolonged kicking and spasms, that was the cringing, weeping, purple-faced, swollen-tongued, bloated sickening twitching entrails-sliding agony he was going to inflict.

Mary Jo Putney, Loving a Lost Lord

…fresh imagery

He wouldn’t need her, and that was as it should be. … When she was old and gray, the time she had known Adam would be the merest ripple in the lake of her life.

Annie Proulx, Close Range-Wyoming Stories

This passage slams the reader into the scene

“Hey, you’re old enough almost a be my grandmother. I rather eat rat jelly than—”

But he was edging closer and Mrs. Freeze saw his trick and the red-flushed neck swelled like that of an elk in mating season, the face beaded with desperate sweat.

...succinct characterization

“Think about it, give me a call.”

“I don’t need a think about it,” said Mrs. Freeze. She dropped the cap of the whiskey bottle, kicked it under the chair. She didn’t need that, either.

Larry McMurtry, Lonesome Dove

Memorable, humorous, backloading

“I don’t know where you keep finding these Mexican strawberries,” he said, referring to the beans. Bolivar … mixed them with so many red chilies that a spoonful of beans was more or less as hot as a spoonful of red ants.

Barbara Bretton, Just Like Heaven

…exquisite rhythm and backloading

…she clung to his shoulders so she wouldn’t slide off the face of the earth and into some vast unknowable universe of shooting stars and fireworks and whispered warnings that some things are too good to be true.

Jacquelyn Michard, A Theory of Relativity

…another memorable simile

He had never been able to think of that except as “innocent,” as guileless and tender as a childhood Christmas.

Tina St. John, Lord of Vengeance

...word choices

The answer came swiftly, softly at first, a dark whisper that curled around him, anchoring his soul to the earth with shadowy tethers.

---

I hope you've enjoyed these magic-wand words. If you have some to share, please do!

 

What is it worth to you to be published?

Is it worth a Saturday and about $75? Is it worth having great food, sitting amidst lots of excited (and exciting) writers, and listening to interesting, informative, amazing presentations?

If it’s not, then you should stop reading now. And maybe think about how badly you really want to be published. Because on April 29, Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers will be holding the Annual Education Event in Golden, at the Table Mountain Inn. The website has more info, but here’s why Pub-Con (catchy, right?) is such a fantastic opportunity:

We start with breakfast. Always a good sign.

The morning session has an Editor whose publishing house was just purchased by Simon and Schuster, the Owner/Agent of a multi-agent literary agency, and a multi-traditionally published author. This panel will give you tons of information, stuff you REALLY need to know, about getting traditionally published. The before, the during, and the after. The dos and the don’ts. The whys and the why nots.

Then we have lunch. Another good sign. And even better, we have an Editor-in-Chief of a small Denver-based publishing house to talk about the different publishing options out there and how you can determine what might be best for you.

 The afternoon session will include a multi-self-published author, a best-selling author who started a publishing house and works with self-publishers, and a graphic designer who specializes in book cover design. They will give you as much information as you’ll be able to absorb on the process of self-publishing. They’ll help dispel notions of how hard, or easy, it is and you’ll have the advantage of knowing the mistakes they made and shortcuts they found, to save you from yourself. And we all need that, right?

So, is it worth $75 give or take? Can you give up 8 hours of your precious time? Only you can decide, but if you want that WIP to see the light of day, this might be the best time and money you can spend to make that happen.

I hope to see you there. Here’s the link to the page on RMFW site: http://rmfw.org/pubcon/ . Seating is limited and I do expect to sell out with this kind of presentation lineup.

In the meantime, Write On! and get your WIP done. You’ll want to take lots of notes at Pub-Con so you can get that puppy published!

 

Volunteers Make it Happen At Colorado Gold

We're seven weeks into the year, and workshop proposals are rolling in. Our selection committee is keeping busy reading through all the outlines, doing their best to decide which proposals will make it onto the schedule in 2017.

Like the rest of the conference staff, the proposal selection committee is made up of volunteers. And if you read any of our emails, or spend any time on our website, you know we're always on the lookout for new people to get involved and be a part of the action.

Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers' mission is simple:

RMFW is a non-profit, volunteer-run organization dedicated to supporting, encouraging, and educating writers seeking publication in commercial fiction.

As a volunteer-run organization, RMFW can only remain beneficial to members through our volunteers’ contributions. Volunteers strengthen our community and nurture an environment of members helping members. Are you thinking about getting involved, and volunteering with RMFW? Listen to what some of our volunteers have to say about their experiences:

"Volunteering is more rewarding for the volunteer than the organization."

"[Through RMFW] I've learned how to find and build my community."

"I've learned how to speak in public, organize big events and, from hanging out with talented writers, I've learned much about writing. RMFW has helped me find my voice, both in the real world and on the page."

The success of our Colorado Gold Conference is dependent on the critical services provided by our volunteers. Each person who helps out keeps our costs down and makes a difference. Also, volunteering doesn't require huge time commitments; even the smallest jobs help us provide an exceptional experience for all attendees year after year.

"The more you put into something, the more you’ll get out of it. I credit RMFW as the one organization above all others that helped me get published."

"My first attendance at the Gold conference thoroughly impressed me, and I knew then that RMFW was the place to be if I was serious about my writing. Volunteering was a way of showing my commitment to the organization and a great way to meet people."

"...if you’re an introvert, serving as a volunteer is a wonderful way of stepping outside your shell."

Volunteering is all about giving back. Remember when you were new and nervous at the conference? Think about the people who helped you. Think about the impact they had on your conference experience. By volunteering, you bring that same experience to others. A win-win for you and the recipient of your goodwill.

"As writer I have benefited from what I have learned at the Saturday workshops, Gold Conference, and critique groups and I wanted to a way to give back."

"Honestly, I've met great people who have become valued friends and I have had a ton of fun."

What would the conference be like without volunteers? Everyone at conference needs something, be it guidance or just an extra pencil. Volunteers bring people together and ensure that everyone has a great time.

"First and foremost, meeting other writers is a great benefit to volunteering. It's a good feeling, too, to know that the volunteer work we do helps other writers on their journeys."

"The Colorado Gold conference is an important part of what RMFW does to support writers and helping the conference run smoothly results in a more valuable experience for everyone!"

Studies conducted on the effects of volunteering have shown that giving time to nonprofits makes us healthier. Boost your own self-confidence through volunteering at this year’s conference. With a sense of well-being, you’ll have a greater focus on learning.

"I want to give back to an organization that has helped me become a better writer. From the critique groups, to the free Saturday programs and even the yearly conference, my writing skills have improved because of my membership in RMFW."

"Being a volunteer allows me to expand my tribe. I am convinced that to be good at anything, you need to be around other people who do that skill better than you... If you want to grow in the craft of writing, don't just join RMFW, volunteer!"

Volunteering promotes personal growth, and your volunteer service adds to your professional experience. You are guaranteed to learn something new while you give your time.

Need an opportunity to come out of your shell and improve your social skills? If you don’t know many writers, volunteering at conference gives you an opportunity to meet people at a reduced stress level.

"Without the support of RMFW, and the friends I've made there, I'm not sure I would be a published author today."

"Attending the conference is fabulous from an educational perspective, but if you want to make the most of the time, and make more friends, you need to get involved."

"Volunteering takes you off the sidelines and helps even shy people get to know the other authors and participants much better."

Any time is the right time to volunteer for RMFW because we always need volunteers. We are one big community of writers helping writers. The more involved you are in our community the more you will receive in return.

"Volunteering is an excellent way to meet people and expand your network of writers. You'll discover that writers come from all paths and roads and freeways of life--the creative mind knows no limits."

"Volunteering is also a way to share your passion in a different way, and give back to an organization that offers so much to every person who asks for support or assistance."

"Whether you spend a few hours once a year, or a few hours every month, volunteers are cherished and appreciated at RMFW, and you'll feel the goodness."

We want your help, but before you join us, ask yourself what you want to get out of volunteering:

What skills do you bring to the table?
How much time are you willing to commit?
Are you looking to do something new and different?
Do you want to work behind the scenes or with people?
Would you like to try something outside your comfort zone?

Volunteering with RMFW is a valuable opportunity to support fellow members, learn new skills, and form friendships. Contact Angela La Voie at volunteer@rmfw.org and include 'RMFW Volunteer' in the Subject line to join our community of volunteers. Not sure how you want to help? Send an email to Angela for suggestions. RMFW has lots of opportunities that meet your expertise, even if your expertise is limited to stuffing envelopes! We thrive on volunteers and want your help.

 

Rocky Mountain Writer #72

Marc Graham & Of Ashes and Dust

This episode features a chat with historical novelist Marc Graham and the latest installment of Writer's Rehab from Natasha Watts.

Marc is back on the podcast (listen to episode #35 for his first visit) a few weeks before the launch of his debut novel, Of Ashes and Dust.

We caught Marc just a few minutes after he returned home from attending an out-of-state workshop for writers about growing and building your online audience.

Marc offers a few tips he picked up, including some ideas about being “relentlessly helpful” when you get the opportunity.

Marc also talks about the power of knowing the core idea of your novel and how that key concept can help you both with the writing itself and with getting the attention of agents and editors.

Marc Graham is an actor, singer, bard, engineer, Freemason, and whisky aficionado When not on stage, in a pub, or bound to his computer, he can be found traipsing about Colorado’s Front Range with his wife and their Greater Swiss Mountain Dog.

This episode starts with a quick burst of inspiration in the latest Writer’s Rehab entry from Natasha Watts. Natasha offers ideas to help make sure your dialogue-heavy scenes come alive for your readers.

Marc Graham

Intro music by Moby Gratis

Outro music by Dan-o-Songs

For suggestions about content or to comment on the show, email Mark Stevens. Also feel free to leave a comment about the podcast on iTunes or your favorite podcast provider.

Host Mark Stevens: http://www.writermarkstevens.com

To everything there is a reason. A time to write, a time to…not

I just got back from a retreat with a group of great writers in a creepy old hotel. There were times when I would have sworn I was the only one there, despite there being at least twelve other people in a twelve-room hotel. It was that quiet, because I couldn’t hear all the other keyboards clicking from where I was.

Why do you care? Okay, you might not, but you should. Because what I’m going to tell you is important. At least it is to me. Anyway, the thing is, what I really mean…yeah, maybe I have been listening to Sirius too much.

Four and a half days just writing. 35,000 words on the page for my newest Bad Carma book. Three meals a day in the companionship of great writers. Reading to/listening with - a bunch of fabulous writers. That’s what I got to enjoy at the retreat.

Not everyone can take four days off, even with a Monday holiday. It doesn’t have to be four days. But for me, it can’t be fifteen spare minutes. I know the butt in chair thing says you should write every spare moment every day. But I can’t. I’m a binge writer. I need to stay focused and when I do, I can write like crazy (35,000 words!). I have to be able to re-read my last couple of chapters, decide or know where I’m going from there and have no interruptions while I blast may way through the story.

If you’re like me, the guilt of not using all those tiny fifteen minute moments to write keeps worming itself way into your subconscious, and they shouldn’t. We don’t all write alike. Find the way that works best for you. For me, it’s at least four hours of clear time. No laundry, no cleaning, no food prep, no weeds calling my name. I can’t write when someone keeps asking me questions (sorry, dear, but I need you to shut the heck up!).

I know other people can pick up and write in short time frames. I read about them all the time. But I need to write like I need to write, and so do you. It’s important that you decide what that way is so you aren’t making excuses for not writing. If you need long blocks of time, how can you get them? Do you enjoy writing in coffee shops? Go there on a weekend. Do you need quiet? Can you reserve a space at the library? Do you have a friend with a nice sunroom they’d let you borrow when they’re out of town?

I have a friend with a VRBO house (she rents it out by the day, like AirBnB, only the whole house). I hope to talk a few writer friends into renting the 5 bedroom house for some long weekends to write. No chores. No husband. Hopefully no phones. But lots of comfy space with peace and quiet, snacks, writers to talk with during meals. And words on the paper. Lots and lots of words. Oh, and by the way, I didn’t get the most words – that was Cindi Myers. So it’s not just me. There are more of us out there than you hear about.

So find your method. If it’s fifteen minutes waiting to pick your kids up, great. If it’s twelve hours straight on a Saturday sitting in a corner of a quiet coffee shop or senior center, peachy. Just make the effort. Make those words happen. Seriously, just Write On!