The RMFW Spotlight is on Sheri Duff-Merz, Programs Chair

2015_Sheri Duff-Merz1. Welcome, Sheri! Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I’m the Programs Chair for RMFW. I have been a member since 2011 and last year I felt it was time to give back to the organization. I answered an email when Mark Stevens was looking for someone to take over Programs so that he could run Podcasts. He made it easy by making sure most of the programs were scheduled for the year. I love attending the free monthly sessions and it has been fun setting them up. It gives me a chance to meet more of my peeps. I’m always open to new ideas so if you have one, drop me an email (denverprograms@rmfw.org). I want to make sure that the free programs are a benefit to our members and that we are representing many different aspects of writing in various fiction genres.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

In March I self-published my YA novel, Rule #9. It is a story about a girl in high school who struggles with her new blended family. It is available on Amazon.

My current work in progress is about a girl who is trying to cope with the loss of her mother who ran off and joined a religious cult.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish -- what's one of yours?

I don’t really have a bucket list. I want to go to New Orleans and I would love to go to England but I would also be content staying in the state of Colorado for the rest of my life. My dream is that one day I will spot a teenager reading one of my stories.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

I love words like, “just “and all of the boring verbs. I use them all in my first draft. I keep a list to go back and take these out during the editing process. I know it would “just” be easier to keep them out to begin with but for me it is “just” easier to write and then fix later.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

I’m a daydreamer. Writing gives me a way to dream on paper. It gives me a way to make my characters real and I can converse with them. And I love hanging out with other writers because they know I’m crazy and they still accept me.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Don’t send crazy stupid letters to agents. Instead, “Just write” and go to conferences and don’t wait so long to join a critique group. And read, read, and read more. Read in your genre and outside of your genre. And don’t be afraid to talk to other writers. People are either nice or they are not. Make friends with nice people and ignore the rest. Then remember that writers are also shy just like the part of you that hides. Make sure to talk to them before you pass judgment.

2015_Duff-Merz_workspace7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

My desk is an old oak kitchen table that I bought at Goodwill and painted turquoise and black. I love it. It’s big and has no drawers. When I look into the room the people who I love the most surround me in frames along with my favorite paintings hanging on the wall. When I sit in my chair behind my desk, my focus is the computer unless one of the three dogs starts clawing at me, wanting my attention. My favorite item on my desk is a poem my grandpa cut out of who knows what and put in a frame.

Never say “Die.” Say “Damn!”- It isn’t classic, It may be profane. But we mortals have need of it, Time and again; And you’ll find you’ll recover from Fate’s hardest slam, you never say “Die”—say “Damn!”

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I am currently listening to The Future of Us by Jay Asher on CD during my commute to my paying job, and I’m reading The Girl On the Train by Paula Hawkins.

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Sheri Duff lives in Parker Colorado with her ultra amazing supportive husband and too many dogs. She also has two adult children who are her world. Learn more about Sheri and her work at her website. She can also be found on Facebook and Twitter.

The RMFW Spotlight is on Rene’ Zimbelman, Publicity Chair

Now that we have so many new members of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Board of Directors, we'll once again be featuring the RMFW Spotlight on the blog. Our goal is to introduce our board members to all our readers and encourage other RMFW members to offer their time and energy to this energetic and growing community of writers.

2015_Rene Zimbelman1. Rene', Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I spearhead PR for RMFW. I’m passionate about RMFW because it’s important for writers to have a supportive community where we can meet other writers and obtain valuable insight to the craft.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

My debut novel, Mizerably Happy, is finished, aside from a last round of edits for formatting, etc. I plan to query agents mid-October. Further information can be found on my website (My pen name is Rene’ Collier).

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

Well, of course I want the right agent and for Mizerably Happy to be traditionally published in the near future! 😉

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

Spending too much time editing before getting to the end. With my sophomore effort, I plan to outline and write until I finish it, THEN go back and do more technical edits.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

I love how an idea can be shaped and polished into a scene, then story. I also love the therapeutic and independent nature of the work.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

I would say stick with the genre you’re comfortable with and keep your story within that framework. If you receive criticism on your work, take into consideration the other person may not read your genre, and don’t change your work just because it doesn’t meet someone else’s expectations.

2015_Zimbelman desk7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

My desk is white, with a Nantucket feel, and it sits in front of a window. I have a few pictures, along with a vase full of flowers and deocorative book that says BE BRAVE and FOLLOW YOUR DREAMS, from which a fairy dangles on a chain.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I’m reading Contrition by Maura Weiler, an author on the PAL panel this year at RMFW GOLD. I highly recommend it! Also reading The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, and I just finished Carry On Warrior: Thoughts on Life Unarmed by Glennon Doyle Melton, who is entertainly funny and insightful. Next on my list is Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, by Elizabeth Gilbert.

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Mizerably Happy is Rene' Zimbelman's first novel. Writing has always been in her blood, whether it be song lyrics, journal entries, poetry or short stories. She was born in Boulder and received her degree in Marketing from the University of Colorado. Rene' enjoyed writing website and promotional copy for a cable television network in Los Angeles, but ached to put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard) and write a novel.

Currently, she live in Centennial, Colorado, with her husband, two boys and Jack Russell. They are endlessly patient as she delves into her untitled sophomore effort.

You can find out more about Rene' and her writing at her website and her blog. She can also be found on Twitter.

The RMFW Spotlight is on Lisa Manifold, Newsletter Editor

Now that we have so many new members of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Board of Directors, we'll once again be featuring the RMFW Spotlight on the blog. Our goal is to introduce our board members to all our readers and encourage other RMFW members to offer their time and energy to this energetic and growing community of writers.

2015_Lisa ManifoldToday the spotlight is on Lisa Manifold, author of the Sisters Of The Curse series

1. Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I am the Newsletter Editor. Prior to this, I was the Hospitality Chair. I got involved with RMFW because my writing, and my thoughts on how to be a writer, and be successful, changed for the better due to joining RMFW. I wanted to give something back to the organization that helped me so much.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

I recently released Thea’s Tale, which is Book One in my Sisters Of The Curse series. By the end of August, I’ll have a novella, One Night At The Ball, and Book Two, Casimir’s Journey, in the same series available. I’m working on finishing up both projects right now. They are all available on Amazon digitally and in paperback.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

That’s a hard one to narrow down. There’s so much I want to do still. My kids are getting older, so a great deal of it involves them. Sail in the Caribbean is one, because I love sailing. It’s the thing I miss most about being in a landlocked state.

2015_Manifold_Thea'sTale4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

Mine would be distractions. I have to force myself off my social media, my checking of reports, marketing, reading and research paths when I’m writing. Otherwise, I get involved in something and look up and the morning is gone. It’s amazing how attuned we are to checking our media.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

The ability to create. I love being creative, of getting an idea and sitting down at my keyboard and beginning to flesh it out. I also enjoy being my own CEO. Being able to write as your career is a gift.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Finish. The. Book. Nothing else can happen until then. I’m an obsessed researcher. Before I embark on something, I read about it, and find out as much about it, whatever it is, as I can. If you’re going to focus on writing full time, it’s easy to get distracted by the ways and means of doing so. But until you finish the book, nothing else can happen.

Also, start a mailing list. Even before you finish the book.

Manifold-desk7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

My computer is in an old computer cabinet. We got it years ago to keep our toddlers away from our electronics. But I have a comfy chair, and it’s in a quiet area of the house. I actually don’t need anything other than a sticky notepad, my latest stuff from my critique group, earbuds, and pen/pencil. That’s it. Anything else, and I start to feel cluttered.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I’m bouncing between two right now, because I read when I have a little down time. The first is 5000 Words Per Hour by Chris Fox, and Take Off Your Pants by Libbie Hawker.

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Lisa Manifold lives in the amazing state of Colorado. She shares her life with her husband, two children, two dogs, and one offended cat. She enjoys skiing and she adores "treasure hunting" at local thrift stores. Her other hobbies include costuming within her favorite fandoms and periods. Her family calls her 'the cruise director' in homage, of course, to a woefully under-appreciated skill.

Latest Release: Thea’s Tale, Book One of the Sisters Of The Curse series. You can learn more about Lisa at her website and Amazon author page. You can also find her on Facebook and Twitter.

The RMFW Spotlight is on Pamela Nowak, President

Now that we have so many new members of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Board of Directors, we'll once again be featuring the RMFW Spotlight on the blog. Our goal is to introduce our board members to all our readers and encourage other RMFW members to offer their time and energy to this energetic and growing community of writers.

This month we've put the spotlight on President Pamela Nowak. Read on and see if you learn anything about Pam you didn't already know.

PamNowak1. Pam, tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I currently serve as President. My official role is to conduct board meetings, manage RMFW business as it comes up between meetings and sign any legal documents. What that actually means is I also serve on a variety of sub-committees including conference, contest and most special committees, I monitor all on-line discussion of the board and manage as needed, I answer questions regarding official policies and procedures, and I look out for the good of the entire organization and its members. When voting or directing action, I must look beyond my personal reaction and see the potential impact on all of RMFW. I am a negotiator, a manager, and a behind the scenes busy-body.

As to why I’m involved…pure and simple, because I believe in and owe so much to RMFW. RMFW supported me in my craft development and nurtured me when I needed it. After years of attending critique group and conference, I moved to Denver and someone (Scott Brendel) asked me to take on an active volunteer role. Of course, one thing led to another.

But being involved has enriched me tremendously on so many levels. It has allowed me to put my non-writing skills (thus keeping them active) to use and to give back to RMFW in a very rewarding way. What makes doing this with RMFW uniquely special, is all the other dedicated and talented writers and volunteers. Everyone gets to contribute, no one takes on the load alone, and everyone recognizes what others do. Few organizations have this quality and thus, I can’t see myself not being involved with RMFW.

2015_Nowak_cover2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

My fourth book, Escaping Yesterday, will be released in September. The book is set in 1905 Elitch Gardens and has deeply conflicted characters with a bit of humor, romance, and a great setting tossed in to lighten their journeys as they cope with trust, incest survival, and PTSD. Thus far, I’ve received three major reviews and they are all positive. I hope to have the book in time for conference but also have several signings set for October including an October 9 launch at Tattered Cover Colfax and an October 24 party at BookBar to raise funds for the historic Elitch Theatre. The book will be available at all Tattered Cover locations, Boulder Books, Who Else Books, BookBar, and several smaller stores as well as via Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

My 2013 release, Changes, was a Colorado Book Award recipient and is available at Who Else Books, Tattered Cover, or Barnes and Noble or can be ordered via Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

Becoming a NYTimes best-seller, of course! More easily reachable items are continued travel and finding joy within each and every day.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

Allowing myself to take on too many volunteer roles (RMFW and others) and devoting my time to them and not to writing. In other words, NOT writing every day.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

Getting feedback from readers. I love hearing that my stories made someone cry or kept them up until 3:00 a.m. or made them late for work.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Don’t resist growth. Learn from critique group, even when it’s painful. Stay on task. Practice, practice, practice.

2015_Nowak_office2015_Nowak_workspace 27. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

My desk is an organized mess. I have stacks of things I am working on (on my desk and on the floor) and reference books on the bookshelves. The stacks look like piles of mish-mash but I can tell you what is in each and every one of them and how far down each item is located. I also have a TO DO list and inspiring quotes. Above my desk, a few items to warm me, such as cards and gifts; nearby, where I can see them—my awards. Two special items are my Angel of Knowledge who holds a book with “writings” and “special words” on its pages and my Angel of Change releasing happiness from her hands. And lots of clutter.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I am currently reading The Bootlegger’s Daughter by Lauri Robinson and finished Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee a couple days ago. Since I read two to three books a week, I’ll be on to something else soon!

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2015_Nowak_candidPamela Nowak writes award-winning historical romance. She has a B.A. in history and, prior to becoming a full-time author, she taught history to prison inmates, served as project manager for the Fort Yuma National Historic Site and ran a homeless shelter. Her novel, Changes, received the 2014 Colorado Book Award for genre fiction and a HOLT Medallion Finalist Award. Previous honors include the HOLT Medallion and HOLT Medallion Finalist Award, a WILLA Finalist Award, a listing among the "Top Ten Romance Novels of 2008" by Booklist, and being named the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers’ 2010 Writer of the Year. Please visit her at her website, friend her on Facebook, or follow her on Twitter (@ReadPamelaNowak).

Let’s Change It Up, Baby!

By Patricia Stoltey

Our RMFW Spotlight post for board members and volunteers is going on vacation in 2015. We have a neverending supply of incredible members who have served RMFW well over the years and continue to volunteer,  but when I see that enormous pool of potential interviewees, I realize there's no fair way to pick and choose who deserves recognition now and who can be deferred until later.

Some of our members have been with the organization for dozens of years and helped build the RMFW we see today. They've passed on the volunteer work to newer members, and those newer folks are the ones who are visible, they're the names we recognize.  In a future post, I hope to talk more about our pioneers and why we owe them a very special thank you.

Meanwhile, I'm going to steal this first Monday spot to write about other things, probably not cabbages and kings, but perhaps some observations about writing and the writing life, book promotion (or the lack thereof), new books on these topics, or just about anything else that might pop into my head.

We're happy to take questions and blog topic suggestions, which you can ask through the Ask the Author link on the blog page. The link is in the right sidebar and it looks like this:

askanauthorTo begin, I have a little quiz for you. Did you know.....

1.  There's a new release feature on the front page of the website that shows RMFW member books' cover art and tiny synopsis? Yep, down there in the right sidebar.

2.  You can sign up to receive the blog posts by email? Check out the right sidebar on the blog page, not too far under the Ask an Author badge. Just fill in your email address and click subscribe so you never miss a post.

3.  Registration for the 2015 RMFW Retreat opened yesterday, November 30th? This year the retreat is scheduled for March 11-15 at the YMCA of the Rockies in Estes Park. There's so much to know about this incredible writing opportunity, I'll merely direct you to the retreat page on the website to learn more. I can tell you, however, that I recently attended a writers' retreat with Northern Colorado Writers at the same location, and from Thursday afternoon to Sunday mid-morning, I churned out over 18,000 words, and I still had time for good meals, wildlife watching (like the mule deer wandering outside my window, the wild turkeys, and the elk), and a bit of fun.

And now I invite you to help us all out with our holiday shopping by leaving your book information in a comment below. Please include a buy link to your favorite bookseller and let us know if the book is available in print or ebook. Don't forget to add the Crossing Colfax Anthology to your list for a lucky reader. If you're up in the Fort Collins area, some of the authors will be at the Barnes & Noble on Sunday December 7th from 1-3.

crossingcolfax150

The RMFW Spotlight is on Saytchyn Maddux-Creech, Membership Chair

The first Monday of the month the RMFW Blog features one of the members of the board of directors or a volunteer. This month Saytchyn Maddux-Creech has agreed to answer our questions. We hope this helps members and potential members get acquainted with the incredible folks who keep Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers going and growing. And just in case these spotlights inspire other members to step forward and volunteer, feel free to email Judy Matheny, Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@rmfw.org.

1. Saytchyn, tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

SaytchenI serve as the Membership Chair, which means I primarily help people who’ve forgotten their passwords to log onto the RMFW website. I also answer questions members and prospective members have about the group, troubleshoot membership-related issues, and try to recruit every writer I meet who isn’t already a member.

I’d long wanted to be more active with RMFW but didn’t think I could do much from Fort Collins. I’m grateful to Vicki Law for recommending me as Membership Chair to the board. It’s a job I can perform from home or anywhere I have Internet access.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

Most of my stories published in literary magazines are still online and may be accessed on the stories page of my terrible website. My latest stories, “Devildoms” (Dangerous Hedge) and “L’Hermitage” (Typehouse Literary Journal), will be published in January.

I’m making revisions on a dark fantasy/near-horror novel that won third place in The Sandy Writing Contest this year. I plan to finish by the end of November.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

To write a great book, and then another, and then another…

Aside from writing, I want to earn a degree in either astrophysics or geophysics (or both!) and retire to a luxury cottage in Wales with a maze-like overgrown garden.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

I began the writing life as an experimental writer. In the MFA program at Colorado State University, I allowed myself to be partially molded into a literary writer. Both of these styles got me into the habit of losing myself in a world and forgetting to tell the story. World-painting is wonderful, Saytchyn, but get to the story.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

Writing. I’m happiest when writing. I get depressed when I take a few days off. When I’m writing, even if it’s not going fabulously, people can tell. I’m more pleasant. If I’m not writing, I’m agitated and crabby.

Also, Writers. I love to be with and talk to other writers. I love conferences, workshops, classes, and retreats. I am an introvert, generally, but not with other writers.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

I’d hesitate to try to persuade myself to change anything, for fear of ending up someplace terrible. But I would probably say, “Start putting in your 10,000 hours as a storyteller at the same time you start putting in 10,000 as a writer. Learn earlier that everyone has something to teach you.”

Saytchen_desk7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

I must have something to write with—a computer or a notebook and a pen. I have a lot of tokens on my desk—gifts from other writers and things that inspire me—and on the wall beside my desk is a map I drew of my story world. But I can write anywhere, and all I need is a computer or a notebook and a pen.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

The last book I read was Dust and Light by Carol Berg. I loved it, and you can read my review on Goodreads. I’ve been reading friends’ manuscripts and have only recently started reading The Diviners by Libba Bray, but if the beginning is any indication, I think it will be bewitching.

The RMFW Spotlight is on Christine Jorgensen, RMFW Secretary

The first Monday of the month the RMFW Blog features one of the members of the board of directors or a volunteer. This month Christine Jorgensen has agreed to answer our questions. We hope this helps members and potential members get acquainted with the incredible folks who keep Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers going and growing. And just in case these spotlights inspire other members to step forward and volunteer, feel free to email Judy Matheny, Volunteer Coordinator at volunteer@rmfw.org.

????????????1. Christine, tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I am currently Secretary of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. I am neither a glutton for punishment nor an avid note taker, but I do believe that if one gains from an organization and believes in it then one should give back. This is my way of saying thank you for all the support and comraderie I’ve had all the years (and they are many) that I’ve been a member of RMFW.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

My latest novel is Missing, the first Detective Casey Jansen crime novel. The author name is CTJorgensen, to distinguish it from my previous humorous amateur sleuth novels. This one isn’t the least bit humorous. Missing is a finalist in the mystery catagory for Colorado Book Awards, 2014. (MIssing can be found at online booksellers including Amazon and Barnes and Noble in hardcover and ebook.)Jorgensen_Missing

My current work in progress is Disappeared, which is being revised (or will be when I finish this task) in order to be submitted. It will be the second in this series.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

Hmm, Bucket List. In the most distant and unlikely to achieve category is trekking in Bhutan, achieving national best seller status, getting film options on the books.

In the category of slightly more achievable is seeing my China book in print (in some form), visiting Croatia and the Greek Isles and seeing Disappeared nominated and winning the Colorado Book Award.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

Procrastination wins in this category. Call it Spider Solitaire, playing bridge, playing golf, (actually practice ranging) or snacking, it’s all procrastination. And, I’m a champion.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

I love those moments when I’m totally into writing and occupying a whole other world where time and space are not a factor. I’m sure most writers enjoy this strange place. If it were scary to be there I’d think it really was schizophrenia, but it’s so enjoyable and free that it is all fun and play. Untangling a situation to find the people inhabiting it and tromping around in their motivations is just so interesting.

The other truly satisfying moment is when I’ve written a scene I really like or come upon an idea that works perfectly. Then I have this high. No other way to express it.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Trust yourself, get at it earlier, work harder and produce more.

7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

OMG, no possible way to describe this desk. What I do have that I love is a print by Salvador Dali depicting Don Quixote on his horse looking at a windmill so far away. The picture so summarizes the writing life.

The other item is an artificial palm tree right in from of my desk, just for fun.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I bought Julie Kazimer’s Frog Prince book and totally loved it. I gave it to my friend to read (she’s also enjoying it) so I can’t remember the exact title, but it is such a hoot.

While I’m writing I tend to read more nonfiction than fiction, then once the project is completed I dig into my TBR stack. Tainted Mountain, by Shannon Baker is top of the list.

Other favorite authors are Tana French, Minette Walters and Stephen White.

Thanks a bunch for sharing with us today, Christine.

The RMFW Spotlight is on Angie Hodapp, Newsletter Editor and Retreat Chair

The first Monday of the month the RMFW Blog features one of the members of the board of directors or a volunteer. This month Angie Hodapp has agreed to answer our questions. We hope this helps members and potential members get acquainted with the incredible folks who keep Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers going and growing. And just in case these spotlights inspire other members to step forward and volunteer, feel free to email Judy Matheny, Volunteer Coordinator.

Angie Hodapp1. Angie, Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I first joined RMFW’s board of directors in 2011, when I answered an ad in the newsletter requesting a volunteer to fill the hospitality chair. Not long after I took on hospitality, I was asked to switch gears and become the programs chair. So for two years, I booked speakers for RMFW’s free monthly programs, which was a total blast! Now, I serve RMFW in two capacities. I am both the retreat chair and the newsletter editor.

I’ve always been a big fan of writing retreats—of sequestering myself away in the mountains for several days, either alone or with other writers, to really focus on my work in progress. I wanted to bring the magic of the writing retreat to members of RMFW, so I put together some numbers and brought a proposal to a board meeting. Funding was approved, and the RMFW Writers Retreat was born! The first retreat took place last September, immediately following the 2013 Colorado Gold Conference. The second took place last March. Our next retreat will be March 11-15, 2015, at the YMCA in Estes Park, Colorado. I can’t wait!

As the editor of Rocky Mountain Writer, RMFW’s monthly newsletter, I get to draw upon my past experience in the magazine industry. My editor antennae are always out, feeling around for stories or regular features. Got an idea? Send it my way!

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

I’m very excited to be published in RMFW’s 2014 anthology, Crossing Colfax. My contribution, “Seven Seconds,” is a superhero story about a guy whose power is neither super nor particularly heroic. (Crossing Colfax is available now on Amazon and includes stories by fifteen RMFW members. Very cool!)

Last February, I really switched gears with my writing. I’d always written science-fiction, fantasy, and speculative YA, but I decided to try my hand at writing contemporary romance. So I did my homework. I read a bunch of bestselling romance novels, studied several how-to-write-romance books and articles, and joined Romance Writers of America. I’m looking forward to attending the RT and RWA conferences in 2015.

The result of this switch is that I’m having a ton of fun! My almost-finished WIP is the first in a trilogy about three very different sisters living in a Colorado ski town. I hope to start shopping it this fall, though I might take the indie-publishing route—I haven’t decided yet, and my plan for the trilogy fluctuates daily. But my romance nom de plume is Holly Anders, so look me up in the near future!

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

Probably like most people reading this, I’d love to be a full-time writer, one who actually makes a decent living at the writing game. Writing aside, I hope to spend more time traveling. My husband, Warren Hammond, and I are going to spend three weeks in China later this year. I can’t tell you how excited we are! Other locales we’re looking forward to visiting in the future include Bali, Japan, and New Zealand.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

I constantly compare myself, rather unfavorably, to my literary heroes. I read China Miéville and think, “I wish I could write like him.” I read Diane Setterfield and think, “I wish I could write like her.” I read Ian Tregillis and Laini Taylor and Connie Willis and Diana Gabaldon and Neil Gaiman and think, “I wish I could write like them.”

If you can relate, then go listen to episode 106 of the Nerdist Podcast, wherein Chris Hardwick interviews Neil Gaiman, and Neil, ever eloquently, tells aspiring writings to stop sabotaging themselves with these negative comparisons. You can’t write like other writers. Stop trying. Write your stories as only you can write them.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

I love piecing together a story from little sources of inspiration that pop out at me during the course of everyday life. It takes some practice, learning to pay attention to those pops of inspiration, learning to recognize them as whole stories just waiting to be told, or as characters in the throes of an intriguing catastrophe, or as mortar for the bricks of a story idea that isn’t quite standing up on its own yet. Being on a constant lookout for story ideas makes writers see the world in far more vivid color.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Get involved with an organization like RMFW sooner rather than later! Or at least join a critique group, attend a conference, take a community-based creative-writing class, find a writing-related Meetup, or do something to get yourself out of the house and into the company of other writers. Online groups serve their purpose, but for me, regular face-to-face interaction with other writers was key to getting, and staying, motivated—not only to write regularly, but also to improve my craft.

Along with that, start showing your work to other people and asking for feedback right away. Don’t be afraid of what others might say about your writing. Give up caring what others might say if they find out you’re a weirdo who writes science-fiction or a sappy sentimentalist who writes romance. I wasted way too much time worrying about such things and pushing my writing off into the future as a “someday” thing.

Angie'sBackpack7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

I’m a backpack writer. I do most of my writing away from home, at coffee shops, libraries, restaurants, bars, or bookstores.

In my backpack, you’ll find all the essentials for hours of away-from-home writing: Kleenex, lip balm, hand lotion, dental floss, eyedrops, Advil, a comb and extra hair ties, hand sanitizer, earbuds, and gum. Depending on the season, you’ll also find sunglasses, an umbrella, a sweater, or fingerless gloves.

Oh…you want to know about the stuff I need to actually write? OK, well, when I’m working on a rough draft, my backpack contains reference books and my Alphasmart Neo. This is a word processor that neither connects to the web nor allows you to easily edit your work. (Google it. Every writer needs an Alphasmart Neo.) When I’m working on a more polished draft, you’ll find in my backpack my laptop, power cord, and stacks of critique notes from my awesome critique partners: Warren Hammond, Mario Acevedo, Jeanne C. Stein, Aaron Michael Ritchey, and Travis Heermann.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I just finished Necessary Evil, the final book in Ian Tregillis’s Milkweed Triptych series, which is brilliant alternate history supposing that Britain had employed warlocks during WWII and the subsequent Cold War to battle a squad of terrifying superhumans engineered by the Germans. Stunning writing, excellent storytelling.

Earlier this summer, I read (and loved!) The Hum and the Shiver and Wisp of a Thing by Alex Bledsoe. These novels suppose that the Tuatha De Danann of Gaelic mythology are alive and well in modern-day Appalachia. Very unique worldbuilding and beautifully flawed characters who will stay with you long after you finish the books.

Up next on my to-be-read list is A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness.

Thanks so much for sharing with us today, Angie. See you at Colorado Gold.

RMFW Spotlight on Judy Matheny, Volunteer Coordinator

The first Monday of the month on the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers Blog we spotlight a board member or volunteer to help you get to know our leaders and members a little better. Today's Q and A is with Judy Matheny, the person you'll want to contact when you're ready to jump in and help keep this wonderful organization humming.

Matheny at Stanley1. Judy, tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I was drafted from my Capitol Hill Critique Group to seek “higher office”. When I joined the group in 2010 I just thought it was stocked with great people and wonderful writers, but I have since learned many of RMFW’s leaders have come from the Capitol Hill Critique Group. Scott Brendel got my name on the ballot for Secretary in this past election, hoping that I would lose and be able to take over his position as Volunteer Coordinator. I did lose, which has been a blessing and I am now the Volunteer Coordinator for RMFW. It’s a wonderful post because I learn the inner workings of this organization and its needs. I also connect with new members and those wanting to help out. I attend the Board meetings and witness first-hand the energy of this organization. I believe our membership would be surprised by the extent of operations, offerings and projects that are underway at any given point and the volunteer support that keeps them going. If you’re interested in volunteering please send me a note at volunteer@rmfw.org.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

Right this moment I am linking two mystery manuscripts written ages ago into a series that my agent, Cricket Freeman (The August Agency), will be advancing for me. Each came so close to publication over the years and had been gathering dust until I was inspired at last year’s Colorado Gold to seek a more modern publishing route. The titles are Need to Know and Signed Statement. A female FBI Agent is caught up in task force intrigue in New York City. I stole from past experiences since I was an agent with the FBI-NYPD Joint Terrorism Task Force in NYC for many years. More to come on this! I have a musical in development in Denver taken from The Princess in My Head, a story I wrote for my daughter when she was eleven. Several talented theater people I know wrote a wonderful score aimed at the middle and high school audience, and now we’re finalizing my script. My new novel is roughly titled The Sylvie Dyer Mystery and is a Colorado historical fiction set in 1892. I hope to finish it by Christmas!

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

Making my living as a fiction writer is a primary one. In the meantime, I dream of taking month-long writing trips each year to France – picking a spot steeped with history and charm, propping my keyboard and concocting my stories. I learned French wines many years ago, so my destinations would be Provence…Beaune in Burgundy…the Loire Valley. I suppose learning to speak French beyond my current high school competency should also be in the bucket.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

I get distracted by life. Right now I am living in Frisco. I thought it would be a great move – I could tele-commute with my work as a financial investigator, and write during off hours inspired by our beautiful mountains. However since I ski and bike and participate in the great social activities up here, I’m struggling again for more time and focus. But it is a fun struggle and one that I am happy to have!

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

I love getting lost in my story and my characters. Creating conversations and dialog among my characters and as they speak, getting to know them better. I also love other writers. I love to learn about their work, their inspiration and their individual disciplines. It helps me.

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

My advice to me would be to seek out a critique group – one with thoughtful people whose feedback can be trusted. I was afraid of what might be said about my writing when I started out. I was afraid I’d be too crushed by critiques to continue. I refreshed my writing approach four years ago when I joined the Capitol Hill group after six years away from writing, and vowed to do it all better this time. So far, so good.

Matheny Desk7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

I am seriously boring in this department, although I do like to have a nice, interesting lamp. And a clock. A Thesaurus is mandatory since I wordsmith just about everything.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

I just finished The Voice is All – The Lonely Victory of Jack Kerouac by Joyce Johnson. It’s a biography that focuses on how he acquired his writing voice. It made me happy I’m not destined to be an important literary author. On the fiction side, one of my favorite things is reading books by RMFW writers. Ian Ballard was a Capitol Hill Critique Group member and his debut Total Victim Theory is powerful. I picked up The Big Bang by WOTY Linda Joffe Hull at last year’s conference and just sent it off to my mom – she’ll love it. Pam Nowak inspires me with her historical research. I am finishing Teresa Rizzo’s latest, He Belongs to Me. Great entertainment and great resources right here in my own backyard!

Thanks, Judy! We appreciate all you do and hope you always find all the volunteers you need so we can continue to grow.

RMFW Spotlight on Tracy Brisendine, Publicity Chair

Tracy BOne of the RMFW Blog monthly features is the Spotlight Q and A where we ask a board member or volunteer to tell us a little bit about themselves and the tasks they perform in support of Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. This month we welcome Tracy Brisendine as our featured board member.

A special note: Tracy is teaching the August free workshop in Denver called Homicide 101 (For Writers, Not Criminals). You can go to the event page for more information about the course content and Tracy's bio.

1. Tell us what you do for RMFW and why you are involved.

I’m RMFW’s Publicity/Public Relations Chair. I organize RMFW’s public face via social media, member communication, and by publicizing our events. I started out volunteering by writing articles for the RMFW newsletter on the free programs. I took over the RMFW Twitter account last year and somehow ended up on the board. It’s possible I may have been coerced, but I won’t name names.

RMFW’s membership is growing and evolving, and I think it’s important our PR grows with us. If anyone has any ideas or comments on where RMFW can improve, or something you’d like to see more of, shoot me an email (publicity@rmfw.org). I’m always looking for new blood; I mean volunteers. So…if PR or publicity interests you, let me know. We’d love to have you on our team.

2. What is your current WIP or most recent publication, and where can we buy a book, if available?

I’m slugging through my third round of edits on my novel and in my copious amounts of free time I’m playing around with a novella. I love all things supernatural and paranormal, so vampires, shifters, witches, and the occasional alien almost always make an appearance in my stories.

My short story, Ghostly Attraction, will be published in RMFW’s Colfax Anthology, launching at Colorado Gold in September. Squee! I’m excited for everyone to meet Dina, my ghost-seeing prostitute.

3. We've all heard of bucket lists -- you know, those life-wish lists of experiences, dreams or goals we want to accomplish-- what's one of yours?

I’ve tried and repeatedly failed to learn another language. I have three years of Spanish and various semesters of French, Latin, and Arabic—but nothing has stuck. Most days, even the English language is hard for me! Maybe someday I can pay an exorbitant fee and have Russian downloaded directly into my cerebral cortex. You never know. As a far-fetched dream, that tops my list, but a more realistic goal would be to learn to cook. Like really cook. I can rock mac-n-cheese and an occasional omelet, but I’d love to make delicious, healthy food and enjoy doing it. Humm…now that I’ve typed that I think that might fall in the implausible dream category too. Damn.

4. Most writers have an Achilles heel with their writing. Confess, what's yours?

I have the attention span of a pygmy squirrel. I get super enthused about a project but almost immediately get distracted by life or other projects. Speaking of projects, I’ll be teaching the free program in August, Homicide 101: For Writers Not Criminals. If you fictionally address the evils that lurk in our world or if you just want to add some realism to your work, I hope you’ll come. Why you wouldn’t want to spend a Saturday afternoon learning about murder is beyond me.

And…I’ll get back on topic now. Making time to write daily is almost impossible for me. And if I pick up a book my writing will be on hold until I’ve finished it. I have zero will power when it comes to reading, and I can’t read and write at the same time.

5. What do you love most about the writing life?

For me, writing, like reading, has always been a form of escapism. The ability to venture into another world is a cheap mini-vacation. I’ll never get enough of it.

I also love all of the fabulous people I’ve met. Writers are some of the most interesting and fun folks to be hang out with. Other than the lack of money, sleep, and glamour, what’s not to love about the writing life?

6. Now that you have a little writing experience, what advice would you go back and give yourself as a beginning writer?

Don’t take criticism personally. It’s taken me years and years of getting pelted with critical reviews and not-so-nice comments to develop a thick skin, but it’s been worth it. You can learn something from every review and opinion, you just have to take a step back and listen without getting your panties in a twist.

7. What does your desk look like? What item must be on your desk? Do you have any personal, fun items you keep on it?

Brisendine_HomeDesk
This is clean and organized, so imagine piles of notes everywhere, and a glass of water balanced precariously on the scanner next to a bag of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. As you can see, Boba Fett has a place of honor on my monitor. Sometimes a good disintegration is necessary now and again. The purple-sparkle lizard is my muse, and the signage in the background is for inspiration and motivation.

Brisendine_DayJobDesk
Since I also try to write during my lunch break at work, here is my other desk. This is the desk that gets way more use for un-fun and non-fictional things. I have to hold on to the good vibes at my day job, so I’m not choking out my creative flow. Hence, my work desk is way more glittery, colorful, and lovey-dovey.

8. What book are you currently reading (or what was the last one you read)?

When Hannah Bowman was here for the May Education Event she made me buy Red Rising. Made me. Like twisted my arm behind my back and threatened to feed me to the anacondas. Kidding, but I just finished it and really enjoyed it. I’ll definitely be reading the second book when it comes out next January. Within the last few weeks, I’ve also read Shield of Winter by Nalini Singh and Maze Runner. Sadly, between judging for Contest, book edits, and working on my various schemes the rest of my reading list is on the back burner until next month.

Thanks for having me on the blog!