The Intangible Benefits of Having a Traditional Publishing Family

Rogue's Paradise
By Jeffe Kennedy

I've worked with a number of editors over the years. Many of them were one-night stands - especially back in my younger days, when I wrote mainly essays and played the magazine market. While I mostly enjoyed those passing encounters - though a few were blind dates that I couldn't wait to put behind me - I've discovered the joys of the long-term relationship.

I'm in a monogamous three-way these days. I work with two editors on my novels and I'm faithful to them. At least for the time being. One, Deb Nemeth, my Carina Press editor, I've been with since 2011. We just completed the Covenant of Thorns trilogy with Rogue's Paradise. And we are putting to bed the eighth book we've worked on together. I won't pretend it's always been hearts and flowers. The beginning wasn't a honeymoon. She put me through two revise and resubmits, made me work to win her heart. Now we're committed to each other with legal contracts. We've learned to work through the rough times, to remember to add compliments along with criticism, to take some time away before disagreeing.

I admit I felt a little guilty when I started seeing another editor, too. I didn't want Deb to feel slighted or that she wasn't enough for me. I needed to branch out, be with other publishers. Fortunately she understood that and now I've been with my Kensington editor, Peter Senftleben, for two years now. He's a different editor than Deb is, which brings stimulating variety to my life. He has his own quirks I've learned to accommodate and he mine. We're working on our fourth book together and each time just gets better.

It's not always easy, juggling two marriages like this. I sometimes have to ask - with some chagrin - if they're the one who prefers I just accept line edits in Track Changes or to comment them out. They know about each other and, when I see them respond to the other's tweets, I often find myself smiling at the warm feeling that inspires. I don't think they talk about me, but I wouldn't mind if they did. After all, it's only fair.

I like having these two people as partners in my publishing life. They shore me up and keep me honest. It feels good to me to be part of a family. And it occurs to me that self-publishing with its wealth of possibilities - which I've taken advantage of with some of my back list - is a lot like single parenting. Sure you can hire help, much like a single parent can get day care, and there's a lot more freedom, but it's a lot of work, too. I really admire the people who can carry it off, like my best friend and crit partner, for example.

But I do think this is something that writers should factor in when considering whether to go indie. For me, having this publishing family means a great deal. It's worth it to me to sacrifice some independence and financial gain to have it. I know not everyone needs that. At this time in my live, however, I know I do.

Jeffe Kennedy
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Jeffe Kennedy is an award-winning author whose works include non-fiction, poetry, short fiction, and novels. She has been a Ucross Foundation Fellow, received the Wyoming Arts Council Fellowship for Poetry, and was awarded a Frank Nelson Doubleday Memorial Award. Her essays have appeared in many publications, including Redbook.

Her most recent works include a number of fiction series: the fantasy romance novels of A Covenant of Thorns; the contemporary BDSM novellas of the Facets of Passion, and an erotic contemporary serial novel, Master of the Opera, which released beginning January 2, 2014. A fourth series, the fantasy trilogy The Twelve Kingdoms, hit the shelves starting in May 2014 and book 1, The Mark of the Tala, received a starred Library Journal review and has been nominated for the RT Book of the Year while the sequel, The Tears of the Rose, has been nominated for best fantasy romance of the year. A fifth series, the highly anticipated erotic romance trilogy, Falling Under, released starting with Going Under in July.

She lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with two Maine coon cats, plentiful free-range lizards and a very handsome Doctor of Oriental Medicine.

Jeffe can be found online at her website: JeffeKennedy.com, every Sunday at the popular Word Whores blog, on Facebook, and pretty much constantly on Twitter @jeffekennedy. She is represented by Connor Goldsmith of Fuse Literary.

6 thoughts on “The Intangible Benefits of Having a Traditional Publishing Family

  1. Hi Jeffe,
    Thanks for a well-put article. I only hope that one day I can talk about multiple editors in my life! Still, the point about having an editor there to agree with and even more importantly to force us to think through our work when we disagree is an important point. Even critique friends can become complacent. Editors help us continually grow our skills. Great job!

  2. Financial gain? I’ve sold far more copies of my first novel with my publisher than I ever did when it was self-published on Amazon and Smashwords. DIY-pubbing is not the magic money machine everyone thinks it is.
    I am most grateful for my publisher’s fantastic editing and formatting (and even more grateful that I never had to mess with CreateSpace!).
    It is a true joy to hold my new mass market paperback in hand, and marvel in the teamwork that brought it to life!

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